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Full text of "Colorado College Nugget (yearbook)"

COLORADO COLLEGE LIBRARY 
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO- 



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COLORADO COLLEGE 
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THE YEAR BOOK OF COLORADO COLLEGE 



Volume XX1I1 




£May, IQ22 



Compiled and Edited by W. KEITH CHICK 



Published by JE^t Claste of 1923 

M. E- Carter, Manager 




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DEDICATION 






This Volume of 
The Pikes Peak Nugget 
is respectfully dedicated to the memory of the founders of colorado college, 

and particularly to the memory of 

Jleberenb Cbtoarb $. Qfcnnep 

whose proposal to the congregational association of colorado resulted 

in the first steps being taken toward the founding of the 

Colorado College, the first institution of higher 

learning in the rocky mountain region. 



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CONTENTS 



Page 

FRONTICE 1 

DEDICATION . 3 

FOREWORD 5 

COLORADO SPRINGS 7 

HISTORY OF COLORADO COLLEGE 11 

TRUSTEES 25 

FACULTY 27 

FRESHMEN 39 

SOPHOMORES 47 

JUNIORS 53 

SENIORS 71 

EVENTS . 85 

Sophomore Banquet 86 

Alpha Kappa Psi Initiation Stunt 87 

Class Scrap 88 

Insignia Day 89 

Homecoming and Barbecue 90 

Y. W. C. A. Circus 91 

Pan Pan 92 

All College Picnic 93 

Colonial Ball 94 

Mens Glee Club Concert 95 

DRAMATICS 96 

Senior Play 1921 96 

Suppressed Desires 97 

Girls Glee Club Operetta 98 

Chinese Lantern 99 

Slave With Two Faces 100 

The Wonder Hat 101 

The Only Girl 102 

The Crimson Cocoanut 102 

Eager Heart 1 03 

Special Delivery , 103 

DEBATING 104 

ATHLETICS 107 

Dedication of Section 108 

"C" Club 109 

Coaches 112 

Letters 114 

Track. 116 

Baseball . 124 

Football 127 

Basketball 133 

Golf 136 

Tennis. . 138 

Wrestling. 139 

Boxing . 140 

Freshmen Football 141 



Page 

ORGANIZATIONS 143 

144 

146 

148 

150 

152 

154 

156 

157 



Nugget 

Tiger 

Student Commission 

Minerva 

Contemporary .' 

Hypatia 

Town Girls Association 

Science Club 

Colorado College Orchestra 158 

Le Cercle Francais ' 1 59 

Tiger Club 160 

Girls' Glee Club 161 

K. U. K 162 

A-B Club 163 

Fortnightly Sketch Club 164 

Euterpe 165 

Mens' Glee Club 166 

Colorado College Band 167 

Episcopal Club 168 

Women's Athletic Association 169 

Mandolin Club 170 

Y. W. C. A 171 

Athenian 172 

Biological Peripatetics 173 

Y. M. C. L 174 

Hagerman Hall Association 175 

Student Government Association 176 

Classical Club 177 

The Dais 178 

La Sociedad Espanola 1 79 

Girls Dramatic Club 180 

Pearsons Dramatic Club 181 

The Question Club 182 

The Independent Club 183 

185 



FRATERNITIES 



Kappa Sigma 186 

Sigma Chi 188 

Phi Gamma Delta 190 

Phi Delta Theta 192 

Beta Theta Pi 194 

Pi Kappa Alpha 196 

Alpha Nu 198 

Inter-Fraternity Council 200 

Alpha Kappa Psi 201 

Phi Beta Kappa 202 

Kappa Beta Phi 203 

Sigma Delta Psi 204 

Delta Epsilon 205 

Theta Alpha Phi 206 

Tau Kappa Alpha 207 



CALENDAR 



209 



ADVERTISEMENTS 221 

SNAPSHOTS AND GROUP PICTURES IDENTIFIED 275 



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FOREWORD 



HOSE who have had the privilege of compiling this Annual have endeavored to make it 
interesting alike to the prospective student, the alumnus, the friend of the College, the 
graduating Senior and the entering Freshman. To what extent we have been successful 
we leave you to judge. 

The Nugget Board is particularly indebted to Mr. Thomas Hugg and Johnnie King, 
whose title page designs and cartoons add much to the appearance of the book. Both of these 
men have given of their time and talent absolutely without charge, because of their friendship 
for the editor and associate editor gained in service overseas. 

The Football action pictures were taken by the Evening Telegraph staff photographer, 
and are used by permission of the Evening Telegraph. 

The following is a partial list of those who have contributed articles or material for 
articles used in this Nugget : 



Glenn Scott 
Eleanor Bartlett 
Norma Bright 
Adelaide Brown 
Clara Burghart 
Danforth Hale 
Frank Frawley 



Ira Hicks 
Leta Gale 
Charles Kimble 
Jean Kirby 
Florence Lawson 
Prof. Mierow 
Dwight Taylor 



Josephine Miller 
Mary Clegg Owen 
James Park 
Ruth Staff 
Ernest Sheppard 
Alice Sweet 
Ford Frick 



Reith Strachan 
Harry Taylor 
Ruth Williamson 
Theodore Winans 
John Duniway 
Ben Wendelken 
Suoma Leino 



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COLORADO SPRINGS 




Nature decreed that there should be built at the foot of Pikes Peak, where mountain meets 
plain, a city which should be known far and wide because of its individuality and charm. Well 
might the Indian pay tribute — as the legend says he did — to the matchless climate and wonderful 
environs of the spot by establishing within the shadow of the "Great White Mountain" a zone 
of neutrality within which all tribes might come and go as they pleased. 

In gratitude for the many blessings received by those who visited the region in search of 
health and recreation, the aborigines wished all peoples to know and to share freely in the 
benefits of this great natural resort. That same spirit of unselfishness and comity actuates the 
residents and visitors of today, as unchanged as are the effervescing springs, the sparkling sun- 
shine or the other features composing the marvelous combination of natural elements and 
surroundings that have characterized the place from the beginning and brought it into world- 
wide fame. 

When Colorado Springs was founded, one could ride 
four hundred miles straight eastward from Pikes Peak 
without seeing, except by chance, a fence or house, or any 
animal life save the wild roamers of the plains or still 
wilder Indians. Half a century has wrought manv changes. 
Spread out on a sheltered plateau at the foot of the guardian 
hills there is now a unique community which has attracted 
the attention and admiration of the traveler, the nature- 
lover and the home-seeker. 

Colorado Springs is widely known as "The City of 
Sunshine." Official records covering a long period of years 

show an average of 310 days of sunshine annually, of which 181 are entirely cloudless. Almost 

exactly one-half of the days have the absolute maximum possible amount of sunshine. The 

average for the year is 70 per cent, of the possible, with only 11 days per year on which the 

sun is not visible. This abundance of sunshine is well distributed throughout the seasons, 

although the greatest amount comes in the fall and winter and the least in mid-summer. 

It is probable that the Spaniards visited the Pikes Peak Region before the Pilgrim Fathers 

landed at Plymouth Rock, and that the Indians had been coming here for a thousand years 

previously; but the wholly authentic recorded history of the region dates only from November 

13, 1806. On that date Lieutenant Zebulon Montgomery Pike first caught sight of the "Great 

White Mountain" which today bears his name, and concerning which he wrote in his diary 

that "no human being could have ascended to its pinnacle." Subsequently the locality was 

visited by numerous explorers. The first permanent settlement, Colorado City, was established rare scene in pikes peak region 



IN THE GARDEN OF THE GODS 




8 




in 1859. This place became the center of the "Pikes Peak or Bust" gold excitement and the 
first territorial capital of Colorado. 

In 1871 General William J. Palmer, pioneer and builder, located the original townsite that 
is now Colorado Springs. With the trained judgment of an engineer and the vision of a 
prophet, he chose a site having just the right proximity to the mountains and planned the 
arrangement of the city's magnificent broad streets, avenues, boulevards and parks. 

The people of Colorado Springs come from all parts of the United States and Europe. 
The present population of 40,000 is probably as cosmopolitan as could be found in any com- 
munity of equal size, but the standards of citizenship are high. There are no slums, no foreign 
quarter or objectionable alien elements, and the bolsheviki and the "reds" are conspicuous by 
their absence. There never was a saloon here. 

It is essentially a city of homes and refinement, a center of culture. In educational fa- 
cilities and in the development of its commercial, social 

and religious life it ranks with many cities of much larger *»> ,> y — -■ — < — . — 

size. If the visitor seeks the unusual, he may ride in comfort 
and safety over the wonderful Pikes Peak Auto Highway 
or the world famous Cog Road to the very summit of Pikes 
Peak, from which vantage point he may behold a vast pano 
rama of nature's handiwork, comprising many thousands 
of square miles of billowy plains and towering peaks, dotted 
here and there with the comparatively insignificant works 
of man. Or he may take the Crystal Park auto trip or the 
Mt. Manitou Incline Railway and from different points 
look down on the many beauties of the region. Or he may 
visit the wonderful Cave of the Winds, unique in its geo- 
logical completeness, where stalactite, stalagmite and many other rare and beautiful formations 
make of the cave a delight to the eye of the ordinary observer and a paradise for the geologist. 
These are but a few of the many features immediately adjacent to Colorado Springs. It 
would be impossible to describe them all, even if space permitted. They must be discovered 
by the visitor himself; and in the finding he will develop that real love of nature which the 
residents of the Pikes Peak Region know. Within a short radius from Colorado Springs there 
are a half hundred nationally known scenic wonders, all easily accessible from the city. Here 
are the massive sandstone formations of the Garden of the Gods. Cripple Creek, the world's 
greatest gold mining camp, is but a few miles distant. Manitou, the Spa of the West, where 
are located the wonderful mineral springs, is reached by trolley. A favorite one day drive 

includes a visit to the famous Royal Gorge of the Arkansas, near Canon City. Also, there are '-'?V^t -1 

literally scores of other principal items and innumerable interesting spots and scenes off the ' ^ " 

beaten paths. on the crystal park auto road 



SEVEN FALLS, SO. CHEYENNE CANON 




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ALTHOUGH Colorado College is strictly non-sectarian and 
independent of all ecclesiastical control, its early history 
shows the influence of the Congregational Church. 

The foundation of Colorado College was first actively 
undertaken by the Congregational Association in 1873, due to 
a proposal of Rev. Edward P. Tenney, who realized the need 
for educational facilities under Christian auspices. The first 
active work of the association was prompted by Professor 
Thomas Haskell, the practical founder of the College, who 
entered into the foundation with great earnestness and acted 
as financial agent during the establishment. Rev. Jonathan 
Edwards was in charge at the opening. 

In May, 1874, the association opened the first classes of 
Colorado College in the old Wanless building, now the First 
National Bank building, with an enrollment of twenty pupils. 
The following September a two-room temporary building was 
erected opposite the Acacia Park with the enrollment increased 
to forty students. For four years this building remained the 
home of Colorado College. By this time the panic of 1873 
and the grasshoppers of 1874 had completely paralyzed business 
and hopes. The cry of those who remained in the territory was 
money for bread and not money for colleges. President Dough- 
erty went east at this time to appeal for financial assistance. but 
after a most earnest effort reported that nothing could be done 
at present in the way of assisting Colorado College financially, 
and with the report came his resignation. For the next five 
years Colorado College existed in the upper story of a building 
on the North side of Pikes Peak Avenue and at the home of 
Professor James H. Kerr, where classes in Mining and Metal- 
lurgy were conducted. 

Rev. Edward P. Tenney Appointed President in 1876 

Through the conscientious efforts of the Ministers of 
Colorado Springs, and other active workers, the people of New 
England and New York were always kept informed of the 
possibilities of Colorado College. Through these constant 
efforts, Rev. Tenney was sent out from New England to in- 
vestigate the reported possibilities of the College and upon his 



favorable report was elected president of the College, assuming 
his active duties in 1876. President Tenney's coming brought 
new life and hope to the College. His first step was to awaken 
a permanent interest in Colorado and the territories of the 
mountains among the people of the East, and especially of 
New England. For this purpose he issued a pamphlet, entitled 
"The New West." 

Realizing the need of preparatory schools for a permanent 
college, he established preparatory schools in the larger towns 
of the territory and in New Mexico and Utah. President 
Tenney was an advocate of the highest standards of scholar- 
ship and was not satisfied with anything below the standards 
of Harvard and Yale. Tenney, had of course, the problem of 
finance. For the purpose of securing a large endowment fund 




4 — First Building of Colorado College 

5 —Cumberland Presbyterian Church 

6 — Bijou Street 



12 



without begging it he entered upon a land scheme which, when 
viewed in the light of present day business ventures, was 
exceedingly farsighted and prospectively profitable, but which, 
on account of a lack of sufficient funds fell through and brought 
untold comment upon his shoulders which was altogether un- 
deserved. His plan was to buy all land in Colorado Springs 
townsite north of Columbia Street. 

Erection of First Stone Building 

The work of the erection of the first stone building of the 
College was begun in the summer of 1877 and was six years 
before the building now known as Cutler Hall was entirely 
completed. During the year 1878 the building committee was 
in a pitiable plight; $2,000 was due mechanics and as much 
more was needed for walls and roof. The money was finally 
raised and the building was made ready for use January 5, 
1880. The design of the building was at that time said to be 
so attractive that it would maintain itself with College halls 
to be rected in later years. Mr Henry Austin of Chicago sent 
a bell for the belfry and the wingless building was outwardly 
complete. On January 13, 1881, President Tenney interviewed 
General Palmer concerning the addition of the wings to Cutler, 
and as a result, the wings were completed May 1882, and that 
year the building was dedicated and called Cutler Academy. 

In 1880 the late Professor William Strieby became Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, and the present Chemistry Department 
is a monument to his training, his faithfulness and his sacrifices. 

Among Colorado College workers, there is one name never 
to be forgotten, the name of Professor Geo. N. Marden. In 
1881 we find him as Professor of Political Economy and History 
and later as financial agent and treasurer. Through his earnest 
efforts over a quarter of a million dollars was secured for Colo- 
rado College. The greatest work of his life, however, was 
securing a President of the College, in the person of Dr. Fred- 
erick Slocum. 

President Tenney retired in 1885 and between the years 
1885 and 1888, the College was administered by an executive 




WHEN CUTLER WAS FIRST BUILT 




THE WAY THE CAMPUS HAS LOOKED 



13 



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WILLIAM F. SLOCUM 
President of Colorado College 1888 1917 



committee composed of the faculty, of which Dr. Strieby was 
the active head. In October 1888, Dr. William Frederick 
vSlocum came to the College as the new president. 



Slocum, New President 

When President Slocum took charge he found a mortgage 
on the campus and the president's home and the first thing he 
did was to raise the mortgages on this property. Up to date 
no one has accomplished more for the college in a financial way, 
and it was during his administration that the College grew from 
one building and a campus, to the College of today. 

In 1888 there was no place to house the students, and 
Cutler Academy possessed all the lecture rooms, laboratories, 
and administrative offices of the College, with the library and 
assembly hall. 

Men's Residence Hall 

In 1889 a residence hall for men was begun which was 
named Hagerman Hall in honor of J. J. Hagerman, the principal 
donor. This building cost $27,000 and was equipped with 
dining hall, reading room, and bed rooms. 

The College began to advance its standards, and new and 
able men were added to the faculty, and students came in 
increasing numbers. 

First Women's Dormitory 

Until this time no provision had been made for the hous- 
ing of the women. A movement was started in 1888 which 
resulted in the building of Montgomery Hall in 1889. The 
building was so named in honor of Mrs. Slocum's sister. It 
is made of Castle Rock stone, with dining rooms, parlor and a 
suite of rooms for the matron. 

Three years later, Henry R. Wolcott of Denver, presented 
the College with an Astronomical Observatory which was 
called "The Wolcott Observatory" in his honor. 

Light, heat and power were the things now most needed. 
A building to provide these things was begun in 1900 and with 
many later improvements has cost nearly $50,000. It now 
supplies fourteen buildings and is under the supervision of an 
engineer. 



14 



Modern Library Started 

In 1900 the College had only a small num- 
ber of books, which were kept in the North wing 
of Cutler Academy. The next need was a modern 
and well furnished library. Mr.Coburn of Newton, 
Mass., gave President Slocum $50,000 for a library 
building. Such a building was started and built 
of peachblow sandstone, which had been selected 
by the Board of Trustees as the building material 
for the rest of the buildings on the quadrangle of 
the campus. The library now contains over 
100,000 bound volumes. 

Ticknor Hale 

The growth of the College became so rapid 
that they were obliged to rent a house off the cam- 
pus to house the women who were unable to get 
into Montgomery Hall. This was very unsatis- 
factory, and Ticknor Hal! was given to us by 
Miss Elizabeth Cheney. 

This building contains an infirmary, a recre- 
ation room, reception room and parlor and was 
built of stone taken from a quarry in Ute Pass. 

Perkins' Fine Arts Hall 

The President now felt the need of a building 
for the department of Music and Art, and as these 
ideas began to take shape, Mr. Willard B. Perkins 
bequeathed $10,000 to be used for the erection of 
some college building. Having faith in the possi- 
bilities of raising the additional money needed, they used 
this $10,000 toward the erection of the building now known as 
the Perkins Hall of Fine Arts. This building was also 
constructed of peachblow sandstone, and furnished us with 
an auditorium especially suited for concerts, lectures and 
"Chapel." Miss Elizabeth Cheney gave an excellent pipe 
organ for this auditorium, in memory of her brother. 




COBURN LIBRARY AND PERKINS HALL 



Palmer Hall 



Palmer Hall was the next addition to the College group, 
and was to contain lecture rooms and laboratories for general 
work and independent research. It was started in 1903 and 
completed at a cost of $267,000. Dr. D. K. Pearson added 
$50,000 toward endowment fund and $50,000 more was added 



15 



for furnishing the equipment for laboratories and the scientific 
work. The building was dedicated in 1904, President David 
Starr Jordan giving the address. It was named after General 
William J. Palmer, the great benefactor of the College. 

McGregor and Bemis Halls 

After the completion of Palmer Hall, the student body 
grew by leaps and bounds and it was again a question of housing 
the women. To provide for this, a third dormitory for women 
"McGregor Hall" was built. It was begun in 1902 and com- 
pleted in 1903 at a cost of $28,000 and named in honor of one 
of the early instructors who rendered valuable services to the 
College. 

None of the three dormitories now existing conformed with 
the President's ideal of a woman's dormitory. A building was 
planned which was to be the center of the girls life on the 
campus as well as a place to meet for social functions. Such a 
building was opened and dedicated in 1908 in honor of Judson 
M. Bemis, one of the most generous patrons of the College. 
It contains accommodations for eighty-two women, a dining hall, 




common room, reception 
room with parlor, and 
the apartment of the 
Dean of Women, a little 
theater, kitchen, store 
rooms and servants 
quarters. 

Cossitt Hall 

As early as 1902, 
President Slocum was 
planning a men's build- 
ing which was to be the 
center of all non-acad- 
emic life of the College. 
In the fall of 1911 he 
announced his plan to 
begin a campaign to 
raise money for what is 
now Cossitt Hall. Early 
in the Spring of 1913, 
$250,000 of the neces- 
sary $300,000 was raised 
and the contract was let 
and the corner stone laid 
at commencement time. 

Cossitt Hall contains 
the gymnasium, a full 
equipment for all ath- 
letics, including quarters 
for visiting teams, a 
large"Common Room," 
offices of the athletic 
dining room, kitchen, 
rooms, dressing rooms 




GENERAL WM. J. PALMER 



COSSITT STADIUM, FROM WEATHER BUREAU TOWER 



director and his assistants, a men's 
the "C" Club, boxing and wrestling 
and shower baths. A large stadium 

is a part of this building. 

In 1917, President Sloeum retired and the Board of Trustees 

chose Dr. C. A. Duniway, then President of the University of 



16 



Wyoming to become President of Colorado 
College. Coming here at the beginning of the 
war President Duniway was called upon to face 
new and perplexing problems, several of which 
were the decrease of the student body, the 
necessity for many new professors and an in- 
crease in the salaries of these instructors. 

It was found necessary during the war to 
drop the four-year course in engineering. This 
was later restored on a six-year basis, four 
years to be given at Colorado College and two 
at an Engineering School. 

In May, 1918, Colorado College desired to 
"do its bit" and so offered housing and accom- 
modations to the vS.A.T.C. This was accepted 
by the government and 250 men were received 
for instruction in radio work. The men were 
housed in Hagerman Hall, Ticknor Hall, Mont- 
gomery Hall and five Fraternity houses. In 
December the S. A. T. C. was demobilized and 
the great helpfulness of the College ceased. 

Colorado College has forged ahead in financial matters as 
is shown by the figures for the year ending June 30, 1921. The 
cash receipts for endowment for that year were $80,117. The 
total donations for endowment and current expenses were 

$97,835. 

Fraternities 

Social life has kept pace with the growth of the College, 
but it is a remarkable fact that fraternities have only been on 
the campus for the last fifteen years. The first fraternities to 
be established on the campus were Kappa Sigma in 1904 
and Sigma Chi in 1905. 

Three years later, 1908, Phi Gamma Delta established a 
chapter here. With three national fraternities in the field 
there were 255 men in the College. Phi Delta Theta came on 
the campus in 1913, five years after Phi Gamma Delta. At 
this time there were 285 men for the four nationals to draw 




DURING THE WAR COLORADO COLLEGE ENTERTAINED THE S. A. T. C. 

from. Fraternity material was still so abundant that Beta 
Theta Pi established a chapter the following year, 1914. Two 
locals appeared in 1917. One of them was a reorganization of 
the Engineers Club which was founded in 1911. It took for 
its name Epsilon Sigma Alpha (rumored to mean "Engineering, 
Science and Art") and immediately petitioned for a charter 
from a professional engineering national. Failing in this be- 
cause the College discontinued the engineering school, a charter 
was accepted from the Pi Kappa Alpha national social frater- 
nity. The other local established a few months before was called 
Omega Psi. When the war broke out in the spring of that 
year, nineteen of the twenty charter members of Omega Psi 
enlisted and left College. This forced the local to suspend 
activity. In the spring of 1920, three members of Omega Psi 
returned from the war and with eight other men petitioned the 
faculty for recognition of the reorganization of Omega Psi under 



17 



the new name of Alpha Nu. This local is now petitioning the 
national fraternity of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

It is contrary to the administrative policy of the College 
to allow sororities on the campus. In their absence, literary 
societies take their place in the social life of the girls. 

Officers and Trustees 

Throughout the history of Colorado College, its destiny 
has been guided by business men of influence and character. 
From the time of William J. Palmer, Empire Builder, States- 
man, and Business Man, down to the present, the business 
affairs of the College have been most ably taken care of, and 
the College has prospered, because of the efforts of its Officers 
and Trustees. 

It is hardly necessary, in reviewing the many years of 
College business, to do more than to give a list of these men; 
their names alone will mean much to anyone accpiainted with 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, and the Centennial State. 

Officers 

Tenney, E. P., President 1874-1890 

Humphrey, J. F., Vice-President 1874-1878 

Wood, Franc O., Secretary 1874-1878 

Jackson, William S., Treasurer 1874-1878 

Severy, James B., Financial Secretary 1874-1878 

Wood, D. Russ, Vice-President 1878-1880 

Hanna, John R., Treasurer 1878-1880 

BartlETT, Enoch N., Secretary 1878-1880 

Parsons, George H., Secretary 1890-1899 

Barlow, J. H., Treasurer 1890-1898 

Slocum, William F., Jr., President 1890-Emeritus 

Loomis, Mabel Ruth, Dean of Women 1898-1917 

MardEN, George N., Treasurer 1898-1908 

Gregg, James B., Secretary 1899-1907 

Parsons, Edward S., Vice-President 1902-1918 

GoodalE, NELLE P. Sater, Cashier, Assist. Treasurer. 1903-1912 
Blackman, Alfred Atwater, Medical Adviser. . . . 1905- 



Touret, Frank H., Treasurer 1908- 

Howbert, Irving, Treasurer 1908-1912 

Sater, Harriet A., Cashier 1910-1918 

Haee, Henry Clay, Attorney for the College 1910-1916 

Tucker, Donald SkeelE, Secretary 1911- 

PostlEThwaiTE, William Wallace, Treasurer. . . .191 2— 

Motten, Roger H., Secretary 1916-1920 

Bennett and Hall, Attorneys for the College 1916-1919 

Duniway, Clyde Augustus, President 1918- 

Churchill, Marion, Dean of Women 1917-1920 

Morrow, Mrs. Josephine R., Registrar 1919— 

McMurtry, James G., Dean of the College 1920- 

PhinnEy, Lucy C, Dean of Women 1920- 

Bennett, John Lewis, Attorney for the College. . . 1920- 

Trustees 

Pitkin, Frederick W., 1874-1890 

Palmer, William J., 1874-1890; 1896-1910 

Willcox, William H., 1874-1890 

Hill, Nathaniel P., 1874-1878 

De La Vergne, George, 1874-1878 

Hanna, John R., 1874-1890 

Bell, William A., 1874-1890 

Rice, Charles B., 1874-1896 

Howbert, Irving, 1874-1878; 1890- 

HumphrEy, Joseph F., 1874-1890 

Austin, Henry W., 1874-1890 

KERR, James H., 1874-1890 

Cutler, Henry, 1874-1899 

Tarbox, I. N., 1874-1890 

Martin, F. L., 1874-1901 

Bristol, Richard C, 1874-1891 

NettlETon, Edwin S., 1874-1890 

France, Matthew, 1874-1890 

Tenney, E. P., 1874-1890 

Jackson, William S., 1878-1917 

McAllister, Henry Jr., 1878-1890; 1915-1920 

Foster, Henri E-, 1878-1890 



18 



Morehouse, P. E-, 1878- 

Slocum, William F., Jr., 1890- 

Adams, Dr. B. F. D., 1890- 

Black, Rev. J. S., 1890- 

Campbell, John, 1890- 

Crooks, Samuel, 1890- 

Curr, John, 1890- 

Gordon, James M., 1890- 

Gregg, Rev. James B., 1890- 

Hagerman, J. J., 1890- 

MonTaguE, Reverend Richard, 1890- 

Parsons, George H., 1890- 

BailEy, George W., 1891- 

Taylor, Rev. Livingston L-, 1892- 

Bonbright, W. P., 1893-1905; 1910- 

Washburn, Reverend Phillip, 1895- 

BoylE.REV. W. H. W., 1895- 

Adams, Edward Brinley, 1896- 

Hayden, Thomas S., 1896- 

Lunt, Horace G., 1897- 

Thatcher, M. D., 1898- 

Peabody, George Foster, 1899- 

Beach, Rev. David N., 1900- 

Trumbull, Frank, 1900- 

Stewart, Philip B., 1901- 

Lennox, William, 1902- 

Braislin, Rev. Edward H., 1903- 

Armstrong, Willis R., 1904- 

Coyle, Robert F., '. 1905- 

MacNeill, Charles M., 1907- 

Myers, Leopold H., 1910- 

Bemis, Albert Farwell, 1911- 

FowlEr, George A., 1911- 

Bemis, Judson M., 1913- 

Shove, E. P., 1915- 

Vance, William M., 1916- 

Thatcher, Mahlon D., 1917- 

Duniway, Clyde A., 1918- 



1890 
1918 
1896 
1891 

1893 
1897 
1892 
1910 
1910 
1895 
1898 
1919 
1895 
1918 
1899 
1903 
1898 
1912 
1915 
1916 

1904 
1920 



1908 

1907 
1919 
1914 
1914 

1919 



Shoup, Oliver H., 1918- 

Grifeith, Benjamin, 1918— 

McLean, Hugh, 1920- 

RoberTS, Harold D., 1921- 

Packard, SpERRY S., L921- 

Bortree, Leo W., 1921- 

THE COLLEGE FACULTY 

Through all the years of her development, Colorado 
College has been fortunate in her wise choice of men and women 
to instruct her students. The Faculty has always been large 
for a college of this size, and the individuals have been strong 
in their respective fields of knowledge. 

It has been a remarkable fact that Colorado College has 
been able to compete with the largest universities for men and 
women of the highest rank; many of the members of her 
Faculty have refused much higher salaries in other places and 
have stayed and served in Colorado College; this loyalty and de- 
votion of Faculty has caused the standards of Colorado College 
to be very high and has raised her standing to a place where 
she is honored by all who know her. 

The task would be too great to give the men and women 
who have served so faithfully, their just dues; we can merely 
give their names and we believe it is honor enough to be listed 
among such associates. 

AhlErs, Lois, 1896-1908 

Armstrong, J. R., -.1906-1910 

Albright, Guy H., 1907- 

Auld, Jean, 1909-1911 

AldEn, E. S., 1910-1911 

AuTEn, Anna, 1910-1911 

ArbucklE, J. H., 1910-1912 

Arnold, Reuben H., 1911-1912 

Abbott, W. L., 1920- 

Bacon, Alfred T., 1874-1877 

Bump, Emma, 1874-1889 

Bliss, Reverend Charles R., 1877-1879 



19 



Bunner, Edward A., 1877-1879 

Bacon, Susan, , . . 1892-1895 

Bowers, Clarence W., 1896-1905 

BrauER, Herman G. A., 1896-1898 

Bagg, R. M., 1898-1899 

Barnett, S. J., 1898-1900 

Bemis, Maude, 1898-1900 

Brehaut, Ernest, 1898-1910 

Brookover, Charles, 1898-1901 

Barrows, Elizabeth, 1899-1901 

Briscoe, Mrs. Robert, 1900-191 1 

Brown, Marianna, 1902-1904; 1905-1917 

Babbitt, K. R., 1903-1907 

Betjeman, A. J., 1903-1904 

Blackman, A. A., 1905- 

Baker, J. F., 1906-1907 

Birchby, W. N., 1906-1907 

Birchby, H. B., 1909-1912 

Bruno, J. F., 1909-1911 

BUSHEE, F. A., 1910-1912 

BreiTweiser, J. V., 1910-1919 

Berryhill, R.~H., 1910-1915 

Bennett, J. L., 1912-1915 

BOATRIGHT, H. E., 1912-1913 

Baker, H. B., 1913-1918 

Barker, G. A., : 1913-1915 

Blakey, M. A., 1913-1915 

Blum, Solomon, 1914-1918 

Brown, H. H., 1914- 

Banning, Ruth, 1915-1916 

Barrett, Florence, 1916-1918 

Barnhart, C. G 1917-1918 

Bemis, S. F., 1917-1920 

Brown, Mrs. Dora T., 1917- 

Beckwith, Holmes, 1919-1920 

Bowen, R. P 1919-1920 

Bartlett, Mrs Florence, 1919-1920 

Bradley, W. F. , . ,,, 1919-1920 



Brumback, Florence, 1919— 

Bramhall, Edith C, 1920- 

Brown, J. G., 1920- 

Bartlett, Eleanor E-, 1921— 

Baxter, J. P., 1921- 

BinklEy,' W. C, 1921— 

Boucher, P. E., 1921- 

Cajori, Florian, 1889- 

Clarke, J. D., 1889- 

Cooper, A. P., 1889- 

Crampton, George, 1889- 

Chapman, F. A., 1890- 

Carter, B. E., 1890- 

Carnegie, Douglas, 1890- 

Cragin, F. W., 1891- 

Crouch, H. C, 1892- 

Coy, Nathan, 1896- 

Crampton, Mrs. George, 1901— 

Coolbaugh, M. F., 1902- 

Cockerell, Theodore, 1903- 

Collais, C. G., 1903- 

Crabtree, Fred, 1904- 

CarpEnter, W. F., 1907- 

Canon, Eva, 1909- 

Clark, J. M., 1909- 

Coolidge, P. T., 1909- 

Cort, W. W., 1911- 

Clark, G. W., 1912- 

Carruthers, J. A., 1913- 

Campbell, Melicent, 1914- 

Churchill, Marion, 1917- 

Campbell, Ella S., 1918- 

Castile, Pearl, 1918- 

Crawford, W. W., 1918- 

Copeland, W. D., 1920- 

Crabtree, Lottie 1921— 

Devin, J. C, 1889- 

Doudna, P. E-, 1890- 



1918 
1900 
1904 
1902 
1892 
1891 
1893 
1903 
1894 
1901 

1905 
1904 
1910 
1906 
1909 
1918 
1910 
1912 
1913 
1918 
1915 
1916 
1920 

1919 



1890 
1899 



20 



Dopf, Charles, 1897-1901 

DeCoursey, Edith, 1897-1898 

Dey, Frederick, 1902-1903 

DeWitt, Donald, 1903-1907 

Davis, Sarah R., 1910-1915 

Davis, Eleanor S., 1915- 

Deutschbein, Marie, 1916-1917 

Dominick, Mabel, 1917-1920 

Dice, R. A., 1917-1919 

Dice, Anna M., 1918-1919 

DaviES, A. E-, 1919- 

Douglas, F. W., 1919- 

Drucker, A. P. R., 1919- 

Dietrich, E. A., 1920- 

DaEhlER, A. H., 1921- 

EaTon, E. W., 1889-1890 

EskridgE, J. T., 1892-1899 

Eaton, Abbie F., 1898-1899 

Ellingwood, A. R., 1913-1819 

FraseR, George A. H., 1893-1898 

Fields, Oma, 1895-1902 

Freeman, Leonard, 1895-1899 

Fick, Wilhelm, 1897-1898 

FraseR, Edith H., 1897-1898 

Faust, Mrs. Maude S., ' 1901-1910 

Finlay, G. I., 1903-1913 

Foreman, C.J, 1907-1909 

FalES, David", 1915-1917 

Fischer, Claribel, 1917-1918 

Fraker, C. F., 1920-1921 

Fling, H. R., 1921- 

Guy, HaTTie E-, 1890-1891 

Gile, M. C, 1892-1915 

Gregg, Reverend James B., 1892-1901 

Gardner, C. F., 1894-1895 

Goldmark, Rubin, 1895-1902 

Gordon, Henry E-, 1896-1900 

Greenburg, William R., 1897-1899 



Gulick, J. G., 1! 

GoodalE, Lincoln, 1901- 

Gilbert, Ruth, 1907- 

Griswold, C. T., 1907- 

GrEEn, F. M., 1909- 

Goetz, C. H., 1913- 

Greene, Doris, 1913- 

Gerlach, F. M., 1915- 

GreEnseeldER, N. S., 1916- 

GarrETT, Myriam, 1917- 

Gerould, Elizabeth, 1917- 

GilmorE, R. J., 1919- 

GoodEnough, A. W., 1920- 

Hendrickson, George E-, 1889- 

Hext, E. E 1889- 

Hall, W. M., 1890- 

Hastings, F. R., 1892-1894; 1911- 

Hofeman, C. St. John, 1893- 

Hutchinson, Edgar F., 1894- 

HuTchinson, BESSE, 1894- 

Hermann, Blanche, 1895- 

Huse, Edith, 1895- 

Hanna, DelphinE, '. 1896- 

Howard, Frederic, 1896- 

HEizER, AddiE, 1899- 

Hall, Henry C, 1902- 

Hills, E. C, 1902- 

Hubbard, Edith, 1902- 

HalE, E. D., 1905- 

Heizer, Dell, 1904- 

HowE, G. M., 1907- 

HurlEy, M. B., 1909- 

Howe, Mrs. G. M., 1910- 

Heck, CM., 1912- 

Hickox, E. J., 1914- 

Hall, Frances, 1916- 

Harlan, Mabel, 1917- 

HiTE, W. W., 1917- 



1899 
1902 
1912 
1910 
1910 
1915 
1916 
1918 
1917 
1918 



1891 
1890 
1895 
1916 
1895 
1895 
1895 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1900 
1911 
1918 
1907 

1905 
1918 
1915 
1918 
1913 
1918 
1918 
1920 
1918 



21 



HUTSINPILLAR, JESSIE, 1919- 

Hulbert, Archer B., 1920- 

Hartness, Rebekah M., 1920- 

Hoag, Barton, 1920-1921 

Howbert, Martha, 1921- 

Jacoues, Edna, 1900-1902 

Jessop, Samuel, 1902- 

Jenkins, Hester, 1912-1914 

Jameson, W. B. M., 1912-1916 

Jackson, W. S-, 1916-1917 

John, Frank, 1920- 

Jencks, M. A., 1920- 

Kerr, James H., 1877-1879 

Krauss, Reverend E. C. F., 1893 

Kachelski, S. C, 1897-1898 

King, H. L., 1911-1912 

Kellerman, Josephine, 1911-1917 

Keahr, R. A., 1914-1918 

Keyte, LA., 1916- 

Kernall, M. J., 1917-1919 

Kampf, Louise F., 1920- 

Loud, Frank H., 1874-Emeritus 

Lamb, H. W., 1889-1901 

Langton, H. H., 1895-1896 

Lake, Mary A., 1896-1897 

Loomis, Mabel Ruth, 1896-1917 

Lancaster, E- G., 1897-1904 

Lamb, Marguerite M., 1899-1900 

Lyon, G. J., 1904-1910 

Love, N. R., 1915-1917 

Latimer, C. T., 1916-1917; 1920- 

Lewis, Rofena, 1916-1917 

Love, R. F., 1916-1918 

Luetscher, Emmons, 1917-1919 

Leaming, Charlotte, 1917— 

Leaming, Susan, 1917— 

Lovitt, W. B., 1918- 

Landers, Effie, 1920- 



LambERT, A. E 1920- 

Marden, Rev. George N 1874- 

Murray, A. T., 1890- 

Magoun, H. W., 1890- 

Mann, Martha R., 1890- 

Mustard, W. P., 1890- 

Montague, Reverend Richard, 1892- 

Murdock, Harvey S., 1894- 

MaTchETT, D. F., 1894- 

Mead, Paul M 1895- 

Muir, Hannah L. T., . . . 1896- 

McAllister, Henry, 1903- 

Merrill, E. S., 1903- 

Moore, Howard, 1903- 

Martin, Elizabeth, 1909- 

Mills, John, 1909- 

Morrill, W. T-. 1909- 

Motten, R. H., 1910- 

Martin, G. E-, 1910- 

Merris, Lota, 1914- 

Mahin, Helen, 1915- 

McLean, Mrs. Lester, 1916- 

Mierow, Charles C, 1916- 

McNair, G. B., 1917- 

McMurtry, J. G., 1918- 

Meunier, Louis, 1918- 

Mierow, Herbert E., 1919- 

Murphy, Helen, 1920 

Noyes, Marion M., 1891 

Noyes, Atherton, 1892- 

Ormes, ManlEy D., 1904- 

Okey, F. M., 1914- 

Ogburn, V. H., 1920- 

Primer, Sylvester, 1890- 

Parsons, Edward S., 1892- 

PrESTon, Grace A 1894- 

Pearson, Albert C, 1885- 

PeralTa, vSophiE BendELARIDE, 1895- 



1921 
1898 
1892 
1891 
1891 
1893 
1893 
1895 
1895 
1896 
1903 
1907 
1904 
1917 
1912 
1910 
1910 
1920 
1914 
1916 
1916 
1917 

1918 

1920 

1921 
1897 
1918 



1891 
1917 
1896 
1896 
1897 



22 



Pershing, Howell, 1897- 

Pattison, S. F., 1899- 

Parry, Anna, 1901- 

Park, Marian, 1902- 

PERRY, Mrs. G. M., 1905- 

Park, T- W., 1907- 

Parsons, C. W. D., 1907- 

Picken, Lillian, 1909- 

Paulus, Viola, 1910- 

Porter, T. L., 1911- 

Persons.W. M 1912- 

Parish, J. C, 1914- 

Parish, Mabel, 1916- 

Pirie, Alexander, 1916- 

Pattee, G. K., 1917- 

Palm, F. C, 1918- 

PowERS, E. B., 1918- 

PhinnEy, Lucy, 1919- 

Parker, Gordon, 1919- 

Parsons, C. L., 1919- 

Printup, Dorothy, 1921- 

Richardson, O. H., 1889- 

Roberts, Jessie M., 1889- 

Ring, Helen M., 1893- 

RorER, J. T., 1894- 

Reinhardt, Louise, 1895- 

Ritchie, Roland H., 1900- 

Robertson, R. N., 1901- 

Ruger, H. A., 1904- 

REad, T. T., 1906- 

ReinhardT, Yna, 1906- 

Rothgeb, C. L, 1910- 

Rehm, H. C," 1916- 

Robertson, J. R., 1916- 

Strieby, William, 1874- 

Stone, George H., 1874- 

vSheldon, Winthrop D., 1874- 

vSurk, Joseph K., 1893- 



1898 
1909 
1902 
1906 
1909 
1914 
1909 
1910 
1916 
1912 
1918 
1918 
1918 
1918 

1921 
1919 



1890 
1890 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1903 
1902 
1910 
1907 
1911 
1919 
1917 
1918 
1921 
1890 
1890 
1895 



vSlocum, Mary G., 1894-1895 

Stearns, Arthur F., = 1894-1896 

Szag, George, 1895-1896 

Schubert, R. F., 1897-1900 

Soutter, Lois J., 1898-1901 

Smith, H. A., 1899-1904 

Shedd, John C, 1900-1907 

Shantz, Homer L-, 1901-1903 

Strang, Isabella, 1901-1902 

Stark, W. R., 1902-1903 

Schneider, Edward C, 1903-1918 

Sturgis, W." C, 1903-1914 

Stevens, R. W., 1903-1907 

Sclater, W. L., 1906-1909 

Smith, Henry F., 1906-1910 

Stewart, Orrie W., . . . 1906-1912 

Sahm, Marie, 1908-1919 

ShErwin, F. L., 1909-1910 

Strieby, Helen, 1 909-191 1 

Spalding, Leila, 1911-1914 

Smith, Lois, 1912-1919 

Shaffer, Susie 1912-1913 

StruThErs, L. B., 1917-1918 

Sisam, C. H., 1918- 

Swart, Tacob, 1919- 

SalTuS, C. N., 1920- 

Smith, J. H. C, 1921- 

SpinglEr, Wilhelmina, 1921- 

Skidmore, Mark A., 1920- 

Tuckerman, Frederick W., 1878-1880 

Tucker, J. F., 1892-1893 

Taylor, Reverend Livingston L-, 1893-1894 

Taylor, Hannah L-, 1895-1896 

Tucker, Fannie A., 1895-1899 

Taft, Maud R., 1903-1904 

Tanner, Laura, 1907-1909 

Taliaferro, Mrs. R. R., 1909-1910 

Thomas, G. B., . 1910-1918 



23 



Terry, E. T 1911-1918 

TilEston, R. R., 1913- 

ThurbER, E. A., 1915-1916; 1919-1920 

Taylor, C. E., 1917-1919 

Thompson, Stith, 1918-1920 

Theobald, Otillie, 1918-1919 

Tway, \V. J., 1919- 

ValEntine, Martha P., 1891-1892 

Van BrigglE. Artus, 1902-1905 

Van Diest, Alice, 1920- 

Wickard, Eloise, 1889-1892 

Walker, Francis, '. . 1895-1900 

Webb, Gerald B., 1896-1898 

Wiggin , Frances S., 1898-1903 

Waid, J. L., 1900-1902 

Woods, Charles F., 1903-1904 

Wyer, M. G., 1903-1904 

Willcox, O. B. 1904-1909 

Wurster, Caroline, 1904-1905 

Woodbridge, H. E., 1906-1917 

Woodsmall, Mary H., 1906-1908 

WinkenwErder, H. A., 1907-1909 

Warren, E- R., 1909-1918 



Woodbridge, B. M., 1911-1912 

Woodbridge, Elizabeth, 1911-1912 

Wollaston, KathErine, 1915-1917 

Winston. A. P., 1917-1918 

Watson, E- S., 1917-1918 

Warnock, Janet, 1917-1918 

West, Paul V., 1918-1920 

WapplE, A. R 1921- 



The Harvard Exchange 

An arrangement with Harvard University is in operation, 
by which that institution, each year, sends two professors for 
a half year to six Western Colleges; Beloit, Carleton, Colorado 
College, Grinnell, Knox, Pomona, dividing the time equally 
among them; and each of them in return, sends a member of 
its faculty to Harvard for a half year, one-third of his time 
to be given to instruction, and the remainder to graduate or 
research work. 

The Harvard Exchange Professor sent to Colorado College 
for the year 1922 is Professor Robert Howard Lord, Ph. D., 
professor of history. 



24 



TRUSTEES 



C. A. Duniway, Ex-oj'ficio President of the Board . . 24 College Place 



Term expires 1921 

Benjamin Griffith. .408 First National Bank Bldg., Denver 
Hugh McLean Colorado National Bank, Denver 

Term expires 1922 

Irving HowberT 17 N. Weber St. 

George Foster Peabody Saratoga Springs, New York 

E. P. Shove 1329 Wood Ave. 

Harold D. Roberts. . . .First National Bank Bldg., Denver. 



Term Expires 1923 

Mahlon D. Thatcher First National Bank, Pueblo 

William M. Vance 1332 Wood Ave. 

SpErry S. Packard 2909 High St., Pueblo 

Term expires 1924 

John Campbell 824 Equitable Building, Denver 

*Frank Trumbull 61 Broadway, New York 

Leo W. Bortree Burns Building 



Term expires 1925 

Oliver H. Shoup Exchange National Bank Building 

William Lennox 1001 N. Nevada Ave. 

Term expires 1926 

Willis R. Armstrong 1420 Culebra Ave. 

George A. Fowler 1225 Wood Ave. 

Phillip B. Stewart 1228 Wood Ave. 



' Deceased July 12, 1920. 



25 




CLYDE AGUvSTUS DUNIWAY, Ph. D., LL.D. 

President. 

A. B. Cornell '92; A. M. Harvard '94; Ph. D. ibid. '97; LL. D. University of Colorado '14; I.E. D. 
University of Denver '14; Colorado College '17. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Pipe Custodian (4), Fortnightly Club, Ethical Club, Y. M. C. A., Baseball, 
Associate Editor "Era" (3), Editor-in-Chief "Era" (4). 

JAMES G. McMURTRY, Ph.D. 
Dean of the College and Professor of Biblical Literature. 
A. B. Wabash '93; A. M. ibid. '95; Ph. D. ibid. '98; Colorado College '18. 
Class President (2), Tennis, Baseball. 

LUCY CORLISS PHINNEY. 

Dean of Women and Instructor in Sociology. 

A. B. RadclilTe '13; Colorado College '19. 

Secretary-Treasurer Class of 1913, Student Government Board (1), Secretary Y. W. C. A. ( 1) (2). 
Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4), German Club (2) (3) (4), Treasurer Idler Club (2), Vice-President (3), Pres- 
dent (4). 

W. W. POSTLETHWAITE. 

Treasurer of Colorado College. 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 

MRS. JOSEPHINE MORROW, A. B. 

Registrar. 
A. B. Kansas '06; Colorado College '1(1. 

E. D. HALE, A. M. 
Dean of Music. 
A. B. Williams '80; A. M. ibid. '83; Colorado College '05. 
Phi Beta Kappa. 



28 



AUBRAY W. GOODENOUGH, Ph. D. 
Professor of English. 
A. B. Oberlin '06; A. M. Yale '08; Ph. D. Iowa '20; Colorado College '20. 

MANLY D. ORMES, B. D. 
Librarian. 

A. B. Yale '85; B. D. ibid. '89; Colorado College '04. 

President Debating Society (1), Tennis, Rowing, Swimming, Skating, Psi Upsilon. 

FRANK MORRRS OKEY, B. C. E. 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B. C. E- Iowa State College '04; Colorado College '14. 

Class Treasurer (2) Pi Kappa Alpha, Track (1) (2) (3) (4), Football (1) (2) (3) (4). 

FRANK WILLIAM DOUGLAS, Ph. D. 
Professor of Chemistry. 
A. B. Albion '05; A. M. Michigan '08; Ph. D. Cornell '19; Colorado College '19. 
Salutatorian, Literary Society, Chemical Club. 

RALPH JOHN GILMORE, Ph. D. 

Professor of Biology. 

A. B. Lehigh '07; A. M. ibid. '10; Ph. D. Cornell '14; Colorado College '19. 

Alpha Nu, Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Delta Epsilon, Gamma Alpha, Secretary of Class (4), Forum 
Debating and General Literature, Assistant Editor Brown and White, Lehigh (1) (2) (3), Editor (4), 
Editor "Epitome" (Yearbook) Lehigh (3), Class Book (4), Lehigh Magazine Editor. 

ARCHER BUTLER HULBERT, A. M. 
Professor of History. 
A. B. Marietta '95; A. M. ibid. '04; Colorado College '20. 
President Junior Class, Baseball (1) (2) (3) (4), Editor College Monthly '04, Phi Beta Kappa. 




29 



■ D 




* 



i -n 



ik\l 



I 




L ■ i 

VJfe 
JfcJ 



s*V 



* §" 4) 






A. P. R. DRUCKER, A. M. 

Professor of Business Administration and Banking. 

A. B. Columbia '01; A. M. Chicago '10: Colorado College 'IS. 
Kings Crown. 

ARTHUR EARNEST DAVIES, Ph. D. 

Professor of Philosophy and Education. 

B. D. Yale Divinity School '91; Ph. D. Yale '98; Colorado College '19. 
Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Epsilon, Tennis, Philosophical Club. 

WILLIAM VERNON LOVITT, Ph. D. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
A. B. Nebraska '03; Ph. M. Chicago '07; Ph. D. ibid. '14; Colorado College '18. 
Delta Epsilon, Sigma Xi. 

ROLAND RAY TILESTON, A. M. 
Professor of Physics. 
A. B. Dartmouth '07; A. M. ibid. Ml; Colorado College '16. 

CHARLEvS HERSCHEL SISAM, Ph. D. 
Professor of Mathematics. 
A. B. Michigan '02; A. M. Cornell '03; Ph. D. ibid. '06; Colorado College 'IS. 

Sigma Nu, Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Epsilon, Football, Mathematics Club, Graduate Scholar in 
Mathematics, Cornell '02-'03, Fellow in Mathematics Cornell '0.V04, Contributor to Mathematical 
Periodicals in the United States and Europe. 

CHARLES CHRISTOPHER MIEROW, Ph. D. 

Professor of Classical Languages and Literature. 
A. B. Princeton '05; A. M. ibid. '06; Ph. D. ibid. '08; Colorado College '16. 
Kappa Sigma, Phi Beta Kappa, Cliosophic Society. 



30 



MARK SKIDMORE, A. M. 

Professor of Romance Languages. 
A. B. Missouri '05; B. S. ibid. '06; A. M. Illinois '09; Colorado College '20. 
Band (1) (3) (4), Orchestra (1) (3) (4), Glee Club (3), French Club, Spanish Club, Italian Club. 

M. A. JENCKS, A. B. 
Assistant Professor of Business Administration and Banking. 
A. B. Wisconsin '10; Colorado College '20. 
Kappa Sigma, Alpha Kappa Psi, Football. 

ALBERT HARTMAN DAELER, A. B. 

Associate Professor of English. 

A. B. University of Illinois '08; Colorado College '20. 

Language Clubs, Scribblers' Club, Literary Society, Editor College Daily, Dramatics, Chairman 
of Class Committee, Debating Team. 

HARRY A. FLING, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 

A. B. Bowdoin '86; A. M. ibid. '87; Graduate Instructor Minnesota '93; Graduate Instructor Chicago 
'94- '96; Colorado College '21. 

Psi Upsilon, College Glee Club. 

GORDON PARKER, M. F. 

Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

A. B. Columbia '00; M. F. Harvard '11; Colorado College '19. 

Handball Champion of Columbia (3) (4), Member of Columbia Team for Inter-Collegiate Chess 
Tournament. 

W. C. BINKLEY, Ph. D. 

Assistant History Professor. 
A. B. California U. '17; A. M. ibid. '18; Ph. D. ibid. '20; Colorado College '21. 
Theta Alpha Kappa, Editor Daily Newspaper. 




31 




VINCENT H. OGBURN, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph. B. Drake University '10; A. M. University of Pittsburgh '11; Colorado College '20. 

French Club, German Club, Natural Science Club, English Club, Scholarship in Biology and 
English at Drake, Fellowship in English at Pittsburg, Regular Contributor to Various Young Folks 
Periodicals. 

JESSIE HUTSINPIELAR, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of English. 
A. B. Wellesley '02; A. M. Ohio '10; Colorado College '19. 
Secretary Class '02, A. G. O. R. A., Wagner Club, Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A. 

CHARLES N. SALTUS, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of Education. 
A. B. Colorado State Teachers College; A. M. Wisconsin '16; Colorado College '20. 

JAMES H. C. SMITH, Ph. D. 
Assistant Chemistry Professor. 
A. B. Monmouth '17; M. S. University of Chicago '20; Ph. D. ibid. '21 ; Colorado College '21. 
Gamma Alpha, Sigma Xi, Pi .Sigma Alpha, Chemistry Club, Philadelphia!! Literary Society, 
Assistant Business Manager Weekly Newspaper and Yearbook. 

EDITH C. BRAMHALL, Ph. D. 
Assistant Professor of History and Political Science. 
A. B. Indiana University '95; A. M. U. of Pennsylvania '96; Ph. D. ibid. '98; Colorado College '20. 
Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Beta Phi, Pi Phi Annual Edition. 

I. A. KEYTE, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of Geology. 
M. Pd. Missouri State Normal '06; B. S. Mo. '09; Colorado College '19. 



32 



WILHELMINA SPINGLER, A. B. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
A. B. Colorado College '21. 

Dramatic Club, Fortnightly Sketch Club, Spanish Club. 

JAMES GLADSTONE BROWN, A. B. 
Instructor in English 
A. B. Ohio University '15; Colorado College '20. 
Beta Theta Pi. 

REBEKAH MARY HARTNESS, A. M. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

A. B. Carroll College '10; A. M. Columbia '17; Colorado College '20. 

Graduate study, summer session University of Michigan, Chicago University, Middlebury College. 

ALBERT R. WAPPLE, A M. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

B. S. California University; A. M. ibid. '15; Colorado College '22 

PAUL E. BOUCHER, A. B. 
Instructor in Physics. 
A. B. Colorado College '18; A. M. Rice Institute '21; Colorado College '21. 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Assistant Laboratory Instructor. 

ALICE VAN DIEST, A. M. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 
A. B. Colorado College '16; A. M. ibid. '21; Colorado College '20. 
Dramatic Club, Minerva, Language Clubs, Dramatic Function Play (4). 



bg 



urn 




33 




DOROTHY PRINTUP, A. M. 

Romance Language Instructor. 
A. B. Oberlin '15; A. M. Radcliffe '16; Colorado College '21. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Literary Society (2) (3), President (4), Junior Play (3) Inter-Society Play (2), 
Dramatic Association (3) (4). 

CHARLES TROWBRIDGE LATIMER, A. M. 
Instructor in Romance Languages. 
A. B. Colorado College '16; A. M. Chicago '20; Colorado College '20. 
Phi Beta Kappa, French Club, Spanish Club. 

RUTH MERRILL. 

Secretary to Dean of Women. 

WILLIAM JAMES TWAY, A. B. 

Instructor in Journalism. 
A. B. De Pauw 'IS; Colorado College '19. 

Class President (1) (4), Tovnbee Club, Deutsche Gesellschaft Club, Associate and Athletic Editor 
College Daily, Editor in Chief Year Book, Football (1) (2) (3) (4), Phi Kappa Psi, Sigma Delta Chi, 
Kappa Tau Kappa. 

JAMES PHINNEY BAXTER, HI, A. M. 

Professor of History. 
A. B. Williams College, summa cum laude, '14; M. A. ibid. '21. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Debating Team ( 1), Editor-in-Chief The Williams Record, Senior Class President, 
Class Marshall, Chairman of Student Council, Valedictorian, Treasurer of Association of ' Eastern 
College Newspapers. Kappa Alpha and Gargoyle Societies. 

MARTHA HOWBERT, A. B. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 
A. B. Colorado College '21; Colorado College '21. 
Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Beta Phi. 



34 



ELIZABETH WOOD GEROULD, A. B. 

Instructor of Chemistry. 
A. B. Colorado College '12; Colorado College '17. 
Hypatia Society, Delta Epsilon. 

SAMUEL JESSOP. 

Instructor in Organ. 

Graduate, with honors, of the Royal Academy, London; Pupil of Henry J. B. Dart, Padding Parish 
Church, London, and of George Ernest Lake, All Saints' Church, Notting Hill, London; eleven years 
organist in London; Organist and Choirmaster, St. Stephen's; Colorado College 1918. 



WILLIAM D. COPELAND, A. M. 

Field Secretary of the College, Freshman Class Officer, Instructor in English. 

A. B. Colorado College '19; A. M. Colorado College '20; Colorado College '20. 

Kappa Sigma, Alpha Kappa Psi, Tau Kappa Alpha, Theta Alpha Phi, Kappa Beta Phi, Sigma 
Delta Psi, Assistant Manager Tiger (2), Associate Manager Tiger (.3), Class Orator (3), Pearson's Dra- 
matic Club, Debate Team (4), President Alpha Kappa Psi '19-'21, Faculty Representative Theta Alpha 
Phi, President Tau Kappa Alpha '20, Secretary Tau Kappa Alpha '22, Secretary Sigma Delta Psi '22. 



MRvS. H. HOWARD BROWN 

Instructor of Music. 
Colorado College '17. 

FLORENCE MAY BRUMBACK, M. S. 
Instructor in Biology. 
A. B. Vassar '09; M. S. Chicago '19; Colorado College '19. 
Sigma Xi, T. and M. Society. 

HENRY HOWARD BROWN. 
Instructor in Voice Culture. 



■ E 



on 




35 




I rasas 



31 



LOUISE FIELDING KAMPF, A. B. 
Cataloguer. 
A. B. Colorado College '12; Colorado College '20. 



ELEANOR SOUTHGATE DAVIS. 
Director of Physical Education for Women. 
Graduate Boston Normal School of Gymnastics '07; Colorado College '14. 
Committee at Large Alumnae of Hygiene. 



EFFIE MAY LANDERS, A. B. 
Instructor in Romance Languages. 
A. B. University of Missouri 'OR; Colorado College '20. 
Glee Club, Basketball Team, Home Service Worker in France 1918-19. 



MELVA M. LATTIMORE. 

Manager Bemis and Cossitt Halls. 



ALLIE ELLITHORPE. 

Secretary Registrar's Office. 
C. S. H. S. '16; Colorado College '17. 



LOTTIE L. CRABTREE. 

Library Assistant. 



36 



GUY HARRY ALBRIGHT, A. M. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
Ph. B. Michigan '99; A. B. Harvard '00; A. M. ibid. '13; Colorado College '07. 
Phi Gamma Delta, Exchange Professor to Harvard '13. 

JACOB SWART, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration and Political Science. 
LIv. B. Ohio Northern University, '11; B. S. ibid. '13; A. M. Harvard '15; Colorado College '19. 
Debating. 

W. LEWIS ABBOTT, Ph. D. 

Professor of Business Administration and Banking. 

A. B. Universitv of Pennsvlvania '11; A. M. ibid. '13; LL. B. ibid. '13; Ph. D. ibid. '20; Colorado 
College '20. 

CHARLOTTE LEAMING. 

Associate Director of The Academy of Fine Arts (Affiliated). 

Art Institute, Chicago '98; Pupil of Albert Herter, New York '97; Frank Duveneck, Cincinnati '98; 
William M. Chase, New York '99; Instructor Art Institute, Chicago '99-'00; Academv of Fine Arts, 
Chicago '09-' 10; Colorado College '16. 

SUSAN FALKENBURG LEAMING, A. B. 

Instructor in History of Art. 

Associate Director of the Academy of Fine Arts. 

A. B. Colorado College '20; Art Institute, Chicago '90-'93; Pupil of Arthur W. Dow, Teachers 
College, N. Y. '03; Instructor Normal Department, Art Institute, Chicago '01-'03; Art Director Teachers 
Training School, New York '03-'06; Director Art Department, Colorado Springs Schools '17; Colorado 
College ' 16. 

Eta Chapter of Agonians, Fortnightly Sketch Club C. C. (IS). 

EDWIN A. DIETRICH. 

Instructor in Violin. 

Graduate Leipsic Konservatorium 1889; Member Gewandhaus and Opera House Orchestras; Colo- 
rado College '20. 

FRANK HERBERT LOUD, Ph. D. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy, Emeritus. 
A. B. Amherst '73; A. M. Harvard '99; Ph. D. Haverford '00; Colorado College '77. 



GEORGE KYNETT PATTEE, A. M. 

Professor of English. 

A. B. Dartmouth '02; A. M. ibid. '03; Colorado 
College '17. 

Delta Tau Delta, Tau Kappa Alpha, Track (2) 

(3) (4). 



CHARLES LYMAN PARSONS, B. S. 

Director of Athletics. 

B. S. Iowa '14; Colorado College '19. 

vSigma Chi, Track (2) (3) (4), Basketball (2) (3) 
(4), Football (2) (3) (4). 



ELEANOR ESTE BARTLETT 
Instructor in Physical Education for Women. 
Colcrado College, '20. 

IRENE STURGIS 
Secretary to the President. 

ELIZABETH E. BUTLER. 

Registered Nurse. 

DR. A. A. BLACKMAN. 

Medical Advisor. 



37 



11, 



m 



•:• jf reafjmen ® Cla** of 1 925 



••• 





® e 



m 



FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS 




Donald Hunt, 

President 



Opal Hughes, 

Vice-President 



Marie Coleman, 

Secretary 



Frank Awes, 

Treasurer 



41 



FRESHMEN 



Adams, HalliE Colorado Springs 

Adams, Susan DeDrury Colorado Springs 

Albert, William Taylor Colorado Springs 

Allen, Georgia Rose Trinidad 

Allen, Robert Bakham Wheatridge 

Anderson, Helen Louise Colorado Springs 

Arms, George Ellis Colorado Springs 

Asbury, Ethel Fay Montrose 

Atkinson, Jo Wilson Colorado Springs 

Awes, Frank Homer Colorado Springs 

Babcock, Clyde Harold Colorado Springs 

Baier, Elsie Buena Vista 

Barker, Dorothy Jean Denver 

Barron, Marjorie Colorado Springs 

Beardsley, Pauline Westcliffe 

Belford, Hugh Warren Tulsa, Okla 

Benbow, George Paige Colorado Springs 

Berry, Chas. Lyman Denver 

Bissell, Marjorie Evelyn Colorado Springs 

Bissell, Stewart Colorado Springs 

Blaine, Thelma AlEne Colorado Springs 

Bradhead, Dorothy Margaret Denver 

Breckenridge, Roy Porter Ordway 

Brewer, Francis Jerome Yoder 

Brewer, Kester Ervin Yoder 

Brice, Brooks Arthur Colorado Springs 

Briggs, Algro Harold Denver 

Brown, Alcott La Junta 

Brown, Helen Clara Colorado Springs 

Brown, Ruth Roberta Colorado Springs 

Brown, Samuel Jamot Florence 

Burleigh, Ida Leona Fountain 

Burnett, Elsie Corinne Beaumont, Texas 

Burns, Kathryn Frances Clifton 

Butterfield, Ralph MylER Colorado Springs 

Card, Elizabeth Denver 



Carnine, Dorothy Eleanor Ft. Collins 

Chapman, Alexander Blades Colorado Springs 

Chapman, Harry ClidE Colorado Springs 

Clark, Elizabeth Helen Colorado Springs 

Clark, Guy Grand Junction 

Clark, Mary Elizabeth Colorado Springs 

Coleman, Frances Marie Denver 

Conklin, Marguerite Adeline Colorado Springs 

Conover, Paul Colorado Springs 

Coons, Kenneth William Colorado Springs 

Copeland, Edna Denver 

Cornell, Alanzo B. . , Denver 

Cornell, Ezra. , . . Denver 

Counts, Naomi Elizabeth Colorado Springs 

Cox, Harold Hugh Denver 

Cox, Joseph Alfred Grand Junction 

Crandall, Willard Dearborn Colorado Springs 

Crowder, Robert Harrison , Denver 

Croy, Erin Fanchon Colorado Springs 

Crumm, William Damon Grand Junction 

Cummings, Olive Florence Woodland Park 

Daily, Charles Robert Colorado Springs 

Dashwood, Wyona Colorado Springs 

Davis, Richard RoymancE Colorado Springs 

Dawson, Harry LEE La Junta 

DeFriES, Russell Colorado Springs 

DelanEy, James Stanley La Junta 

DeWoody, Helen Flint Paonia 

Dill, Maurice FoulkE Broomfield 

Dixon, Kenneth Wyman Colorado Springs 

Dixon, Melvin King Tulsa, Okla 

Dorlac, Dorothy Mae Colorado Springs 

Doubt, Donald McDonald San Joaquin, Calif. 

Douglass, Arthur Melvin Manitou 

Druehl, Margaret Martha Colorado Springs 

DuFF, MalEn Mary Colorado Springs 



42 



Duncan, George LEE, Jr Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Duniway, John Cushing Colorado Springs 

Eakin, Glen Edward Manhattan, Kans. 

Eddtns, Earl Stonewall Denver 

Edwards, Ruth Gwendolyn Colorado Springs 

Ellingwood, LeRoy Edward Colorado Springs 

English, Fred Colorado Springs 

Epsey, Abigail Ruth Trinidad 

Ethell, Fuller White Denver 

Fair, Waldron DeWitt Medicine Lodge, Kans. 

Fairbanks, Helen Dale Delta 

Farmer, Genevieve Leslie Canon City 

Fast, Lucy Wood Denver 

Fink, Jennie Roberts Colorado Springs 

Fist, Rita Henrietta Pueblo 

FiTzell, John Alvin Denver 

FiTzsimmons, Bernard Francis Colorado Springs 

Flaherty, James Bernard Colorado Springs 

Forry, Walter Edward Grand Junction 

Frank, George Albert Alamosa 

FrawlEy, Harry Joseph Colorado Springs 

Freudenberger, Clay Briscoe Colorado Springs 

Gardner, Edwin Colorado Springs 

Gardner, Rebecca Colorado Springs 

Garnier, TherESE Evelyn Pueblo 

Garvey, Grace May Colorado Springs 

Gilberg, Eada Lena Colorado Springs 

Glass, Charles Harold Grand Junction 

Goodwin, Harry Colorado Springs 

GovrEau, Clarence Pickett Rocky Ford 

Grady, Georgia May Grand Junction 

Graham, W. George Calhoun, Ala. 

Gray, Arthur Orr Colorado Springs 

Graybeal, Helen Pueblo 

Gruner, Raymond Philip Colorado Springs 

Hadden, Esther Louise Canon City 

HadlEy, Vera Beatrice Colorado Springs 

Hale, Donald Emerson Colorado Springs 



Hamilton, William Wesley Denver 

Hansen, William Adolph Wheatridge 

Harrington, Gertrude Denver 

Harrison, Charles LaVergnE La Junta 

Harrison, Jack Colorado Springs 

Haupt, Curtis Raymond Colorado Springs 

Hawks, Della Ruth Colorado Springs 

Haymes, John Melvin Colorado Springs 

Heller, Ralph Stanley Greensburg, Pa. 

Hestwood, Rena B Ouray 

HilES, Helen Huntley Pueblo 

Hope, Charles Rae Colorado Springs 

Hopkins, Ruth Mae Monte Vista 

Hughes, Francene Opal Colorado Springs 

Hunt, Donald L Colorado Springs 

Hunter, Washington Irvine Delta 

Hurst, Frances Alberta Pueblo 

Jacobs, James Crankshaw Colorado Springs 

James, Frank Leland Littletown 

James, Helen Black Rock, Utah 

Jellison, Sibyl Rowena Clara Belleville, Kans. 

JENNER, HELEN C Denver 

Joder, Ruth Evangeline Denver 

Johnson, Gladys Birdie Colorado Springs 

Johnson, Luther Leeland, Jr Florence, Ala. 

Kemp, Charles Robert Colorado Springs 

Kennicott, Joe Hale Denver 

Kesterton, Rose Mae Collbran 

Killian, Emmett William Colorado Springs 

King, Verna Gertrude Colorado Springs 

Kinsman, Gladys Marie Colorado Springs 

Knuckey, Ruth Florence Holly 

Koch, Mary LucilE Colorado Springs 

Kurth, Alison Ian Colorado Springs 

Kyffin, Alfred Edgar Delta 

Larson, Masina Denver 

Leonard, Mary Katherine Ft Morgan 

Lin, Tung-Yu Peking, China 



43 



Linger, Albert Denver 

London, Alice Viola Colorado Springs 

Lowry, Mildred Ellen Granger, Ind. 

Lucas, Mildred Beulah Colorado Springs 

McColl, Harry Alexander Colorado Springs 

McCool, Samuel Burnett Okolona, Miss. 

McCormack, Donald Adair Chicago, 111. 

McDonald, Jean Glenwood Springs 

MacDougall, Francis Ellis Denver 

McGEE, Norman Schoonmaker Plainfield, N. J. 

MacGregor, Muriel L Estes Park 

McHendrie, Janet Hamilton Trinidad 

McIntosh, Cecil Colorado Springs 

McKee, Kathleen Linwood Starksville 

McLaughlin, Glenn Everett Colorado Springs 

McLean, Dorothy LylE Limon 

McMahan, Ada EsTELLE Trinidad 

McMullen, Lois Rebecca Loveland 

Mahan, Eugene Heath San Antonio, Tex. 

Maher, John Edmund Colorado Springs 

Mann, Mildred LEE Denver 

Mann, Russell Elliott Alliance, Nebr. 

Mantey, Edith Grand Junction 

Marshall, Allan La Junta 

Masters, Dorothy Virginia Colorado Springs 

Matteson, Alberta Elizabeth Pueblo 

Matthews, Theodore Arthur Colorado Springs 

Maupin, Inez Delta 

Miller, Claire Ellington Hotchkiss 

Miller, Edith Irene Canon City 

Miller, Frances Sara Trinidad 

Miller, Urban Russell Marble Hill, Mo. 

Milliken, William Boyd, Jr Denver 

Milner, Harold Wood Canon City 

Mintz, Sarah Colorado Springs 

Moffatt, Maudie Elizabeth Colorado Springs 

Moore, Kenneth Michael Colorado Springs 

Morath, Edward Henry Colorado Springs 



Moreland, Leslie Clark Simla 

Morgan, Kathleen Grey Lafayette 

Morris, Howard Layton Vega, Texas 

Morris, Margaret May Colorado Springs 

Morton, KaThERINE M Colorado Springs 

Mull, Henry Austin Ashland, Kansas 

Mull, Lena Addella Ashland, Kansas 

Muncy, Auburn HillERY Montrose 

Nassour, Virginia Victoria Colorado Springs 

Nesbit, Paul William Canon City 

Nichols, Lloyd Colorado Springs 

NorEn, Chalmer LeRoy Glenwood Springs 

Ogle, Kenneth Neil Colorado Springs 

Oliver, GlEnora Marguerite Pueblo 

Olson, Howard Colon, Nebr. 

Parkhill, Evelyn Marie Colorado Springs 

PaTTon, Irma Frances Colorado Springs 

Pick, Dorothea Louise Colorado Springs 

Pinckney, Susie Evangeline Colorado Springs 

Pollock, Ruth Janet Colorado Springs 

Pooler, Maxine Austin, Minn. 

PylE, LuELLA Elma Colorado Springs 

Rawlings, Paul Monte Vista 

Reimer, Earnest Richard Colorado Springs 

Reinking, Bethany Colorado Springs 

Rice, Helen Lawrence 

Rivers, William Louis Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rippey, Geo. Stone '. 

Roddis, Wilma Jeanne Denver 

Roedel, Dorothae Isabella Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Roseberry, Betty Pendaries Raton, N. M. 

Round, Hazel May La Junta 

Ryan, Edward Colorado Springs 

Sargent, Margaret Douglas Colorado Springs 

Schaede, Frank B Colorado Springs 

Schilling, Alice Lydia Colorado Springs 

Scott, James F Colorado Springs 

Sears, Lillian E Colorado Springs 



44 



Seely, Mary Elizabeth Delta 

Sevitz, Martha Lee La Junta 

SewEll, David Liston Pueblo 

Sewell, Kenneth Ellsworth Las Animas 

Shepherd, Jack Harlow Denver 

Sherk, Irene Mildred Greeley 

Sherman, Lloyd Belk La Junta 

Sims, Lester Wayne Simla 

Smith, Leota Lucille Canon City 

Smith, Margaret IsabellE Colorado Springs 

SolT, Mildred Agnes Ft. Morgan 

Southmayd, Elizabeth Ann Rapid City, S. D. 

Spencer, Dorothy Adajane Craig 

Staff, Harold Hays Colorado Springs 

Stewart, Martha Gertrude Denver 

Stoneham, Harriet E Colorado Springs 

Strong, Ralph Greeley 

Swan, Robert Putnam Ramah 

Sweeney, Paul Dewey Cincinatti, Ohio 

Taft, Alexander T Colorado Springs 

TaggarT, Janette Vaux Colorado Springs 

TancrEd, John, Jr Wichita Falls, Texas 

Taylor, Hazel Elizabeth Colorado Springs 

Taylor, Hildred Isabel Colorado Springs 

Taylor, Leila EmelinE Colorado Springs 

Tevebaugh, Lavetta Colorado Springs 

Thayer, Mary Elizabeth Canon City 

Thomas, Tom John Colorado Springs 



Thompson, Melville Tulsa, Okla. 

Ting, Hung-Yu '. Peking, China 

Todd, Kenneth Paul Rocky Ford 

Tripp, Richard Henry Colorado Springs 

Trotter, Elizabeth Montrose 

Trumbull, Alice WingaTE Denver 

Tucker, Howard Newell Eureka, Kans. 

Van Meter, Dorothy Loveland 

Vincent, TilliE Louise Denver 

Wadell, Charles Wilder Colorado Springs 

Waldron, Shelton Lucy Colorado Springs 

Walker, Ruth Canon City 

Waters, Frank Joseph Colorado Springs 

Watson, Mabel Clara Calhan 

Watt, Ruth Marie Denver 

Weaver, Haskins Lael Denver 

WEST, HarlEyn E Golden 

Whang, Shia-Chen Peking, China 

WhislER, Nina Valentine Winfield, Iowa 

White, Ramona Cripple Creek 

Wigram, Alexander Lionel Delta 

Williamson, Elizabeth Durango 

Williamson, Robert U Grand Junction 

Willson, Theodore Roosevelt Limon 

Wilson, Mary Florence Durango 

Yates, Florence Evelyn Colorado Springs 

Young, Leonard Wallace Greeley 

ZickEFoosE, Marion Colorado Springs 



45 





SMfc**$ 




—g. 




46 



r 




ophphje 




'A. 



(TJLZ^> 





SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 




Bruce Matlock, Margaret Carter, 

President First Semester Vice-President 

(Francis Thomas, President Second Semester) 



Jack Dern, 

Treasurer 



Russell Hunter, 

Manager of Barbecue 



49 



SOPHOMORES 



Adams, Erma Marie Elbert 

Albert, Agustus James Colorado Springs 

Amidon, Albert Bennett Pueblo 

Anderson, Bruce Emery Boulder 

Anderson, George Herbert Garden City, Kans. 

Arps, Elwyn Albert Denver 

Bainbridge, Warren Stuart Colorado Springs 

Beckman, Beatrice Gail Canon City 

Bergner, Merton Nolan Grand Junction 

Bliss, ELLETT Denver 

Bollinger, Anna Marie Denver 

Bowman, Newell LeRoy Colorado Springs 

Bradley, Thelma Elizabeth Colorado Springs 

Briggs, Maryetta Margaret Denver 

Brooker, Jane Adelaide Colorado Springs 

Brookhart, Lester Raymond Las Animas 

Brown, Elizabeth Alice Denver 

Brown, Zella Vivian Creston, Iowa 

Bruce, Joe Wheeler Colorado Springs 

Burghart, Robert Colorado Springs 

Capps, OlEn Dudley Colorado Springs 

Carter, Margaret Denver 

Chapman, William Bennett Colorado Springs 

Clopper, Elma Jane Manitou 

Coleman, Margarete Alletta Denver 

Collier, Alice Marjorie Denver 

Cox, Genevieve Nelsine Canon City 

Cramer, Louis Denver 

Crockett, Bertram Waide Pueblo 

Crockett, Catherine White Pueblo 

Croll, George Brinker Greeley 

Darling, Ray Willard Greeley 

Dascomb, Evangeline Denver 

Davies, Dorothy Ellenor Colorado Springs 

Dern, Joseph Jackson Colorado Springs 

Downer, Leo Allen Denver 



Drake, Delma Jane Colorado Springs 

Earnest, Nellie Montrose 

EaslEy, Mary Adelaide Colorado Springs 

Echols, OlliE Matador, Texas 

Ellis, Margaret Florence Denver 

Emery, Ralph Waldo Colorado Springs 

Farmer, Marie Elizabeth Canon City 

Farmer, Ruth Columbia St. Joseph, Mo. 

Finlay, Mildred Irene Pueblo 

Fisher, William Roland Colorado Springs 

Gagliano, John Pueblo 

Gallavan, Ella Mae Ordway 

Garber, William Franklin Colorado Springs 

GaThings, Charles H Earle, Arkansas 

GjERDE, Ora Jeanette Denver 

Graham, Eleanor Kathryn Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Graves, Virgil Voris Colorado Springs 

Greiner, Perry Pohlman Denver 

Hale, DanForTh R Colorado Springs 

Hanes, Wilbur Gaston Colorado Springs 

Harvey, Joseph Earl Denver 

Heckenlively, Lena Owen Colorado Springs 

Henaghan, Eleanor Josephine Denver 

Hetherington, Janet Welsh Colorado Springs 

Hine, James David Colorado Springs 

Hitchcock, Anna Jane Florence 

Holm, Adelaide Jennie Hyrum, Utah 

Hood, Catherine Canon City 

Howbert, Edgar Cowgill • Colorado Springs 

Humphrey, Elmer Clarence Chapman, Kans. 

Hunter, Russell Palmer Colorado Springs 

Hupp, Laura Rhoda Colorado Springs 

Hutchinson, NELL Colorado Springs 

HlTchinson, Ruth Colorado Springs 

James, Karl Edward Denver 

Johnson, Irene Wright Pueblo 



50 



Kay, Ryan Thomas Pueblo 

Kestung, Bruce Delta 

Kimble, Charles Allen Pueblo 

Kingsbury, Kenneth K Manitou 

Kirby, Jean Marvin Colorado Springs 

Kirkpatrick, Martha Mae Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Lewis, Martin Charles Colorado Springs 

Lilyard, Lucille Evelyn Denver 

Little, Ruth Agnes Colorado Springs 

Logan, Paul Stewart Canon City 

Louthan, Earl Eugene Littleton 

Lusk, Harold Victor Greeley 

LylES, John Wesley Anguilla, Miss. 

McCampbell, Eunice Willard Russell Gulch 

McClelland, Mary Irene Ft. Collins 

McMurtry, James G., Jr Colorado Springs 

Marschat, Laurence E New York, N. Y. 

Massey, Ervin H Colorado Springs 

Matlock, Bruce King Denver 

Merryman, Mary Evans Colorado Springs 

Miller, Mary Christine Colorado Springs 

Miller, James Robert Colorado Springs 

MiTTERWALNER, Merwin H Denver 

Mohrbachor, Maxine Denver 

Moody, Lorraine Pueblo 

Mott, AraBellE Ione Scott City, Kans. 

Mott, Jessie Evelynn Scott City, Kans. 

Moulton, Winifred B Pueblo 

Muncaster, Howard Edmond Independence 

Mussey, John Miller Denver 

Nelson, Earnest Miller Colorado Springs 

Niccolls, Dorothy E Burlington, Iowa 

Nichols, Proctor Wallace Manitou 

Nicholson, Ruth Colorado Springs 

Nunn, Marshall Colorado Springs 

Nyhus, Dorothy Elizabeth Raton, N. M. 

Olson, Reuben Emmanuel Aurora, Nebr. 

OverholT, Clyde Ray Denver 



Owens, Ralph A Pikeview 

Padgett, Floyd Colorado Springs 

Patrick, Esther Grace Colorado Springs 

Patterson, William Edward Colorado Springs 

PaTTon, Ruth Virginia Colorado Springs 

Powell, Lester B Las Animas 

Ralston, James Lawrence Belvidere, 111. 

Reinking, Marvin Henry Ida Grove, Iowa 

Randolph, EarnesTinE B Eskdale 

Reynolds, LorEne Woodland Park 

Rice, Campbell Franklin Colorado Springs 

Robinson. Clark Smith Colorado Springs 

Rockafellow, Gerald DurkEE Canon City 

Rose, Lois Colorado Springs 

Rule, Mildred ElberTa Wichita, Kans. 

Ryan, Francis Stephen Colorado .Springs 

Saffold, William Glenn Denver 

Sandford, Thomas Herbert Manitou 

Sando, Stanley Stewart Versailes, Ohio 

Scott, Glenn G Grand Junction 

vSherk, Gertrude Genevieve Greeley 

Smith, William Lewis Colorado Springs 

Snyder, Minnie Rose Grand Junction 

SodEman, Tolson Colorado Springs 

Spencer, Paul Rufus Denver 

Stanley, Marion Enzelo Aurora, Nebr. 

Stealy, Kirk H Colorado Springs 

StrothER, Dwight Lynn Colorado Springs 

SwEnson, Lillian Juliette Colorado Springs 

Taylor, RaE Nathaniel Doylestown, Wis. 

Tessier, Miriam Isabel Colorado Springs 

Thatcher, George W Colorado Springs 

Thebus, Helen Kay Denver 

Theobald, Edna M Denver 

Thomas, Francis Wesley Colorado Springs 

Van Fleet, BlEn Bert Alamosa 

VorrEitor, Clara Loveland 

WaeglE, Inez Marian Ucross, Wyo. 



51 



Walker, Bonnie Marguerite Colorado Springs 

Wallis, Lynn Bodien La Junta 

Wardwell, Robert Hayes Colorado Springs 

Weavor, Joseph Lawrence, Jr Rocky Ford 

Weir, Ellen Colorado Springs 

Weldon, Henry Benjamin Garden City, Kans. 

Wendell, Kenneth Johnson Buttcs 

Wesson, Joseph Theodore Denver 

White, JuaniTa Del Norte 

Wilbur, Simeon E. S Denver 

Williams, Bernice Geraldine Ft. Morgan 

Williamson, Rawden Alfred Grand Junction 

Williamson, Wilfred SteinER Colorado Springs 

WyaTT, William Charles Denver 

Young, William Gould Colorado Springs 

Ziman, Louis Colorado Springs 




%^%f£*>j vSatv^jS. 










FREDERICK H. COSSITT MEMORIAL 



5 '2 




54 



JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




Harriett Bumstead, 

President 



Tames Park, Jr., 

Vice-President 



Alice Sweet, 

Secretary 



Elwood Amos, 

Treasurer 



bb 




CHARLES H. BEMIS, Jr. 

Medford, Mass. 
Kappa Sigma, Alpha Kappa Psi, Sigma Delta Psi. 
Major — History. 
Track (2), Wrestling (2), Captain (3), Baseball (2), Football (2), "C" Club (2) (3), Hitchy Kow (2), 
Social Service (2), Chapel Monitor. 

"A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing." 

HARRIETT LOWELL MASON 
Greeley, Colo. 
Contemporary, Factotum(2) (3). 
Major — Biology. 
Dramatics (1) (2), Student Government Treasurer (2), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Cabinet (2), Mando- 
lin Club (1) (2), Inter-Society Council (3), Nugget Board of Control (3). 

"And if I laugh at any mortal thing, 
'Tis that I may )iot weep. 

ANNA A. HERZOG 
Fort Morgan, Colo. 
Contemporary (2) (3), Vice President (3), Secretary (3), Dramatics, Treasurer (2) (3), Sophomore- 
Junior Play (2), Stage Manager Eager Heart (2), Nugget (3), French Club Secretary (3), Floor Manager 
Colonial Ball (2). "Unbiassed, or by favor, or by spite." 

ROBERT S. McILVAINE 
Lamar, Colo. 
Phi Gamma Delta, Alpha Kappa Psi, Tau Kappa Alpha. 
Major — Business. 
K. U. K. (3), President Spanish Club (3), Kiwanis Club Representative (3), Inter-Fraternitv 
Council (3), "C" Club (Honorary Member) (3), Spanish Club (2) (3), Debating Team (2), Cossitt 
Dining Association (3), Football Squad (3), Assistant Business Department (3), Junior Farce (3). 
"Dreio audience and attention still as nite or summers noontide air." 

MILDRED JEAN GILBERTSON 

Fort Morgan, Colo. 

"Would that I might guess your thoughts." 

RAY C. GREEN 

Grand Junction, Colo. 

Kappa Sigma. 

Major — History. 

Track (I), Glee Club (2), Junior Farce (3). 

"As good be out of the world as out of fashion." 



56 



JAMES ELWOOD AMOS 
Kappa Sigma, Tau Kappa Alpha, Alpha Kappa Psi, Theta Alpha Phi. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — Economics. 
Junior Farce (3), Glee Club (3), B. A. Club (3), Debating (2), Band (2), Orchestra (2), Junior 
Debating (3), Pearsons (2) (3), Treasurer (3), Social Service Work (3), Chairman of Enthusiasm Com- 
mittee (3), Junior Farce (3), Wake Forest College (1), Class Treasurer (3). 

" strong in will to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." 

MARGARET C. THOMAS 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Biology. 
Biological Peripatetics (3), Mandolin Club (1), Eager Heart (1), Dramatic Club (1) (2) (3), Athletic 
Letters (1), May Festival (1), Science Club, Town Girls Sophomore Representative (2), Vice President 
(3), Colonial Ball (2). 

"Thou wert my guide, philosopher and friend." 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



FRANCES NOBLE TUCKER 

Minerva Factotum (3), Vice President (3), Theta Alpha Phi. 

Major — Romance Languages. 
Athletic Board (2) (3), Letters (1) (2), Y. W. C. A. (3), Circus Manager (2), Dramatics (1) (2) (3). 
Committee (2) (3), Function Play (1), Coach for February Play (3), Eager Heart (2), Prunella (2), 
Student Commission (3), Town Girls (3), Class Secretary (1), Tiger (3), Nugget (3), French Club (3), 
Glee Club (2) (3), Vice President (3), Junior Farce (3), ""The Only Girl" (3). 

"Words are like leaves; and where they most abound, 
Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found." 

LAWRENCE FREDERICK KOERNER 

Pi Kappa Alpha Colorado Springs, Colo 

Major — Engineering. 

SHERMAN NELSON BUSHNELL 
Alpha Nu. Georgetown, Colorado 

Major — Engineering. 
Student Commission (2), President Independent Club (2), Secretary Hagerman Hall Association 
(1), Track Squad (1) (2). 

"A man with wonderful possibilities and — a girl." 

FRANCES SIM 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — English. 
Town Girls (2) (3), French Club (3), Y. W. C. A. (2) (3), Circus (3), Dramatics (2) (3), Make up 
Committee "Prunella" U. of C. (1). 

"But to see her ivas to love her." 




57 




VERNA M. HIXSON 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — Biology. 

Town Girls (1) (2) (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3). 

"That chastity of honor which felt a stain like a wound." 

W. DOUGLAS CORLEY 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — Chemistry. 

"C" Club (3), Science Club (2) (3), Tiger (3), Track (2) (3). 

"My nature is subdued 

To what it works in, like the dyer's hand." 

MYRON EDWIN CARTER 

Denver, Colo. 
Phi Delta Theta, Alpha Kappa Psi. 
Major — Economics. 
Assistant Manager Baseball (1) (2), Manager Baseball (3), Assistant Manager Football (2) (3), 
Nugget (2) (3), Manager (3), Question Club, Inter-Fraternity Council (3). 

"Great oaks from little acorns grow." 

LILLA MUNGER 

Denver, Colo. 
Major — Chemistry. 
K. U. K. Vice President (3), Science Club (3), Dramatic Club (1) (2) (3), Eager Heart (2). Student 
Government (3), Glee Club (1), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3). 

"Her face, oh! call it fair, not pale." 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN GARBER 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Chemistry. 
"Tin a rootin' toot in' fightin' shootin' Mining Engineer." 

ISABELLA NINA CHAPMAN 
Calhan, Colo. 
Major — Psychology. 
Science Club (3), Spanish Club (1), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Girls' Dramatic Club (1) (3) Town 
Girls Association (1). 

"Her voice was ever soft, 

Gentle, and low, an excellent thing in woman." 



58 



HARRIETT W. BUMSTKAD 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Hypatia. 
Athletics-Letter (1), Vice President (3), Dramatics (1) (2), Vice President (3), Sophomore-Junior 
Play (2), French Club (3), Glee Club (3), Junior Farce (3), Town Girls (1) (2) (3), Class President (3). 

"She is beautiful and therefore to be wooed, 
She is a woman, therefore to be won." 

JOHN H. DAYWALT 

Aspen, Colo. 
Sigma Chi. 
Wrestling (1) (3), Football (1), Papetown Committee (3). 
"I dare do all that may become a man; 
Who dares do more is none." 

CURTIS BARKLA HINTON 

Grand Junction, Colo. 
Sigma Chi. 



Football, "C" Club. 



Y. W. C. A. (1) C 
Club (3). 



MRS. ELSIE BENNETT ESSEX 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — History. 
(3), Town Girls (1) (2) (3), Dramatic Club (1) (2) (3), Athenian (3), A. B. 

"More is thy due than more than all can pay." 



MALCOLM D. GRAHAM 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Sigma Chi, Sigma Delta Psi, Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Major — Business and Banking. 

"C" Club (1) (2) (3), Question Club, Track (1) (2), Captain (3), Nugget, Class President (2), 

"Hitchy Kow," Captain Frosh Football (1), Football Squad (2). Inter-Fraternity Council. 

"None but himself can be his parallel." 

KEITH CHICK 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Alpha Nu, Alpha Kappa Psi. 
Major — Economics. 
K. U. K. (3), Tiger Associate Editor (2) (3), Nugget Editor (3), French Club (2), Inter Fraternity 
Council (3), Treasurer Alpha Kappa Psi (3), President K. U. K. (3), Secretary (3). 

"Modestly bold, and humanely severe." 




59 




LAWRENCE WOLFE 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Kappa Sigma. 

Major — Business. 

A. B. Club (3), Tennis (1) (2) (3), Captain (1) (2), President of Tennis Association (1), "C" Club 

Inter-Fraternity Council (3), Basketball (3), Boxing (3). 

" Filled with fury, rapt, inspired." 

VERA WAEGELE 
Ucross, Wyo. 
Hypatia. 
Major — Chemistry. 
Student Government Advisory Board (3), Y. W. C. A. (3), Northwestern U. (1), Science Club, 

"Minds that have nothing to confer 
Find little to perceive." 

MILDRED MARIE EARNEST . 

Montrose, Colo. 
Major — English. 
Mandolin Club (2) (3), Glee Club (2), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Dramatic Club (1) (2) (3). 
"I am never merrv when I hear sad music." 



NEWELL LEROY BOWMAN 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Kappa Sigma. 

Major — Physics. 

"My man's as true as steel." 



First year at C. C. 



JOSEPH PERKINS BUSHNELL 
Georgetown, Colo. 
Major — Engineering. 
Masonic Club (1), Band (1) (2) (3), Student Commission Non-Fraternity Men (2), Hagerman 
Hall Association, President (2), Secretary (3), Independent Club, Vice President (3). 

"Do well and right, and let the world sink." 

THELMA BURCHFIELD 
Florence, Colo. 
Major — Music. 
Dramatic Club (3), Eager Heart (3), Mandolin Club (3), Athenian (3), First two years in Park 
College, Mo. 

" Those about her, from her shall learn the perfect ways of honor." 



60 



DOROTHY GRAVES 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Romance Languages. 
Dramatics (2), French Club (3), Spanish Club (2) (3), Glee Club (3), Town Girls (2) (3), Y. W. C. 

A. (2) (3). 

"Others for language all their care express." 

DONAVAN WAYNE KISSINGER 

Fort Collins, Colo. 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

"I'm here for business." 

HELEN ISABELLE FINLAY 

Pueblo, Colo. 

Major — Biology. 

Athenian (2) (3), Secretary (3), Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Fortnightly Sketch Club, Function Play (1), 

Costumer Minuet (2), Prunella (2), Wonder Hat (2), Nugget Board (3), Spanish Club (1), Y. W. C. A. 

(1) (2) (3). 

"Rather than he less, 
Cared not to he at all." 

HELEN ARMSTRONG 
Denver, Colo. 
Major — Biology. 
Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Cabinet (3), "Eager Heart" (3), Science Club (3). 
" faithful, gentle, good, wearing the rose of womanhood." 

Orlando Mcdonald 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Phi Delta Theta. 
Major — Geology. 
Geology Assistant Instructor. 

"He travels fastest who travels alone." 

FLORENCE E. LAWSON 
Garden City, Kansas 
Major — History. 
Athenian (2) (3), President (3), Athletic Board (3), Dramatics (1) (2), Eager Heart (2), Prunella 
(2), Town Girls (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), A. B. Club (3). 

"Officious, innocent, sincere; 

Of every friendless name, the friend." 




61 




C. RUSSELL CARTER 

Greeley, Colo. 

Sigma Chi, Alpha Kappa Psi. 

"C" Club, Freshman Football (1). Track (1) (2), Assistant Manager Tiger (2) (3). 

"If she undervalue me, 

What care I how fair she be?" 

ROXANA JACKSON 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — Economics. 

Athletic Board (2), Nugget (3), Town Girls (1) (2) (3), Dramatic Club ( 1 ) (2), Spanish Club ( 

"For Fools rush in where angels fear to tread." 



1) (2). 



FRANK W. MAHAN 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Kappa Sigma, Tau Kappa Alpha, Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Major — Business. 
Glee Club (1) (2) (3), Manager (3), Debating (2) (3), Manager (3), Question Club, A. B. Club 
(3), President (3), Junior Farce Manager (3), Assistant Business Department (3). 

"Well languaged Daniel." 

CLARA BURGHART 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Minerva. 
Major — English. 
Athletic Letter (2), Athenian (3), Dramatics (2) (3), Town Girls Secretary-Treasurer (3), Y. W. 
C. A. (1) (2) (3), Cabinet (3). 

" They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts." 

MARGARET C. THOMAS 
Major — Biology 

JAMES C. PARK, Jr. 

Florence, Colo. 

Kappa Sigma, Alpha Kappa Psi, Phi Beta Kappa. 

Track (1) (2) (3), "C" Club (2) (3), Class Vice-President (3). 

"On their own merits modest men are dumb." 



62 



LILLIAN MADELYN HARDEE 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Latin. 
Classical Club (3). 

"Who mixed reason with pleasure, and wisdom with mirth." 

EDWARD J. O'BRIEN 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Sigma Chi. 

Major — Biology. 

Freshman Football (1), Sophomore mens banquet (2), Junior Play Committee (3), Junior Farce (3). 

"None shine brighter than this fair son of Erin." 

WILLIAM C. SENNING 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Alpha Nu. 

Major — Biology. 

Biology Laboratory Instructor (3), Biology Peripatetics (3), Science Club (2) (3), Wrestling (1). 

"His wit invites you by his looks to come. 

Bid when you knock, it never is at home." 

EUNICE K. SCRIBNER 
Pueblo, Colo. 
Major — English. 
Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Eager Heart (2), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Town Girls (3), Barbecue (2), 
May Fete (2), Y. W. C. A. Circus (2). 

"Elegant as simplicity and warm as ecstacy." 

MARY LORETTA HICKS 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Economics. 
Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Eager Heart (3), Town Girls (1) (2) (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2), Treasurer (3), 
Classical Club (3), A. B. Club (3). 

"A peace about all earthly dignities, 
A still and quiet conscience." 

J. M. WILSON 

Lucerne, Colo. 

Sigma Chi. 

Major — Business 

Football (3), Track Manager (3). 

"Whom neither shape of danger can dismay. 

Nor thot of tender happiness betray." 




63 




MARTIN WOODBURY DRAKE 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Economics. 

"Constancy — Thou art a Jewel." 

MARY A. MORRIS 

Vega, Texas. 
Minerva. 
Major — History. 
Athletic Board (3), Dramatics (1) (2) (3), "Wonder Hat" (3), Town Girls Junior Representative 
to Board, Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3). 

"The sweetest thing that ever grew 
Beside a human door." 

MABEL L. SADLER 

Denver, Coi,o. 

Athenian. 

Major — Economics. 

Dramatics (1) (3), Glee Club (1) (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (3), Wheaton College, Wheaton, 111. (2). 

"And those that paint her truest, praise her most." 

DANIEL DWIGHT TAYLOR 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Physics. 
Science Club (3), Spanish Club (1), Physics Assistant (2) (3). 
"An honest man's the noblest work of God." 

CARL A. BRUMFIELD 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Phi Delta Theta, Theta Alpha Phi. 

Major — Chemistry. 

Glee Club (2) (3), President (3), Orchestra (2) Band (1), Assistant Conductor (2), Conductor (3), 

Junior Farce (3), Treasurer of Class (2), Hitchy Kow (2), "The Only Girl" (3), Nugget Board (3), 

Science Club (2), (3) President (3), Pearsons Dramatic Club (2) (3), American Chemical Society, Masonic 

Club (1). "/ am not in the roll of common men." 

RUTH STAFF 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Phi Beta Kappa. 
Major — History. 
Contemporary-Factotum (2), Secretary and Treasurer (3), Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Eager Heart (2), 
Function play (2), Town Girls (1) (2) (3), Frosh Representative (1), Tiger Correspondent (2), Y. W. 
C. A. (1) (2) (3), Vice President (3), Class Secretary (3). 

"A progency of learning." 



64 



LESTER A. BUSEY 
Hotchkiss, Colo. 

Alpha Nu. 
Major — Business 
Track (1), Basketball (2), Football Squad (3), "C" Club Honorary (2) (3). 
"Education only sharpens the tiger's claws." 

MARY LOUISA HILLS 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 
C. C. (1) (3), Indiana (2) (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Girls Dramatic Club (1) (3), Town Girls 
Association (1) (3). 

"The social smile, the sympathetic tear." 

EDNA VAN HORN 

Pueblo, Colo. 

Contemporary 

Major — Economics. 

Athenian (2) (3), Secretary Treasurer (2), President (3), Student Government Treasurer (3). 

Monty House President (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), Member (1) (2) (3). 

"Thy soul was like a star and dwelt apart." 

KENNETH LLEWELLYN GORDON 
Fort Collins, Colo. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Major — Biology. 
Science Club. 
"He thot as a sage, tho he felt as a man." 

JOHN GIBSON WINANS 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Major — Physics. 

Glee Club (3), Band (1) (2) (3). 

"A man he seems of cheerful yesterdays 

And confident tomorrows." 

GERTRUDE MARGARET KLEIN 

Golden, Colo. 
Major — History. 
Contemporary, Factotum (3), Athenian (2) (3), Vice President (3), Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Custodian 
(2), Dramatic Committee (3), Eager Heart (1) (2), Sophomore-Junior Play (2), Function Play (2), 
Coached "Wonder Hat" (3), Student Commission (3), Inter-Society Council (3), Junior Farce. 

"True wit is nature to advantage dressed." 




65 




HAROLD WAISS 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Sigma Chi, Sigma Delta Psi. 

Major — Biology. 

Football (1) (2) (3), Captain Elect (4), Track (2). 

"I could not love thee, dear, so much. 

Loved I not honour more." 

ELEANOR JOSEPHINE HENAGHAN 

Denver, Colo. 
"Shure she's French." 

ESTHER NORTON 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Euterpe (2) (3). 

Major — Music. 

Dramatics (2) (3), Town Girls (2) (3), Junior Representative to Board (3), Y. W. C. A. (3), Euterpe 

Vice President (3). 

"Music resembles poetry, in each 

Are nameless graces which no methods teach. 

And which a master-hand alone can reach." 

J. BRYAN HIXSON 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Geology. 
Independent Club. 

"I was never less alone than when by myself." 

ALICE SWEET 

Denver, Colo. 
Hypatia. 
Major — English. 
Dramatics (1) (2) (3), Sophomore-Junior Play (2), Secretary (3), Student Commission (3), Student 
Government (1) (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3), Conference (1) (2), Field Secretary. 

" 'Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call. 
But the joint, force and full result of all." 

HUGH M. MORTON 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Kappa Sigma, Sigma Delta Psi. 

Major — Economics. 

Track (2), Pearsons (1), K. U. K. (3), "C" Club (3). 

"In every deed of mischief, he had a heart to resolve, a head to contrive, and a hand to execute." 



66 



RICHARD BARTLESON VALORE 

Littleton, Colo. 

Alpha Nu. 

Major — Economics. 

"Blessings on thee, little num." 

MARY LOR ETTA HICKS 
Major — Economics. 

RUTH HEGENER 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Contemporary. 

Major — Biology. 

French Club (2) (3), Town Girls (1), Y. W. C. A. (1) Science Club. 

"True as the needle to the pole, 
Or as the dial to the sun." 

ESTHER NORTON 

Major — Music 

O. CARLTON DEIN 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 
Major — Civil Engineering. 
"His was a genial nature." 

S. LEON HUGHES 

Muskogee, Okla. 

Major — Biology. 

French Club (1), Science Club (1) (2) (3). 

"Worth makes the man." 




61 




LILLIAN SULLIVAN 

Denver, Colo. 

Major — Latin. 

U. of C. (1) (2), Mandolin Club (3), Treasurer (3), Classical Club (3), President (3), French Club 
(3), Dramatics (3), Junior Farce (3), Y. W. C. A. (3). 

"Too civil by half." 

THEODORE H. WINANS, Jr. 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Major — Physics. 

Glee Club (2) (3), Band (2) (3). 

"Sentimentally I am disposed to harmony." 

KENNETH KNIGHT ILLINGWORTH 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Independent Club. 

STENA DEARBORN 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — Chemistry. 

U. of Kansas (1), Y. W. C. A. (2) (3), Dramatics (2) (3), Prunella (2), Women's Athletic Board (3). 
Science Club. 

"She hath a dainty beauty in her life." 

WILLIAM A. THOMPSON 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Business. 
Band (1) (2) (3), Assistant Manager Football (3), Assistant Manager Basketball (3), A. B. Club (3). 

"He is the pine-apple of politeness." 



"C" Club, Track (2) (3). 



CHARLES BRADLEY PAGE 

Granada, Colo. 



68 



VIRGIL VORIS GRAVES 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Engineering. 

CATHERINE HELEN WELLS 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Major — Education. 

Student Government, McGregor House President (3), Y. W. C. A. (1) (2) (3). 

"A light to guide, a rod 

To check the erring, and reprove." 

REITH STRACHAN 

Denver, Colo. 
Beta Theta Pi. 
Major — Mathematics. 
K. U. K. (2), President (3), Tiger Assistant Editor, Basketball Assistant 



Pan-Hellenic Council 
Manager (2), Manager (3) 



"Never elated when one man's oppressed; 
Never dejected white another' s blessed." 



LEA BLANCHE EDGAR 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — Romance Languages 
"Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge.' 




DOROTHY JEANETTE MILLER 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Major — English. 
Y. W. C. A. (1) (2), Town Girls (1) (2). 
"/ stood among them, but not of them." 



RUTH ZIEGLER 

Lansdowne, Penn. 

Major — English. 

Oberlin College (1) (2), U. of C. (3), Dramatic Club (3). 

"But from the hoop's bewitching round 
Her very shoe has power to wound." 



69 




70 




f^, 



72 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




Albert Lyles, 

President 



Rowena Hampshire, 

Secretary 



Edmond Crockett, 

Treasurer 



LorEna Berger, 

Vice-President 



13 




DORIS MARGARET HAYMES, A. B., Major— History. 
Theta Alpha Phi. Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Hypatia Society, Girls' Dramatic Club, Freshman Play (1), Sophomore-Junior Play (2), Pearson's 
Play (4), Junior Play (3), Student Commission (3), Vice-President (4), Nugget Board (3), Inter-Society 
Council, Secretary (4), Home-Coming Committee (3) (4), Women's Athletic Association Board (2) (3), 
Vice-President of Class (2), President Class (3), Manager Colonial Ball (2). 

"We are such stuff as dreams are made on." 

EDMOND ALLISON CROCKETT, A. B., Major— Business Adminis. and Banking. 

Phi Delta Theta, Alpha Kappa Psi, Phi Beta Kappa. Pueblo, Colorado. 

Assistant Editor Nugget (3), Manager All-College Reception (4), Perkins Scholarship (2), Class 
Treasurer (4), A and B Club. 

"Genius must be born — and never can be taught." 

MARION DOROTHY MATTHEWS, A.B., Major— Biology. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Girls' Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., Town Girls' Association (1) (2) (3) (4). 

"Give us a taste of your quality." 

FERN LYDIA PRING, A. B., Major— Chemistry. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Science Club Vice-President (3) (4), Women's Athletic Board (2), Athenian Society (2), Girls' 
Dramatic Club Secretary (3), Colonial Ball Minuet (2). 

"/ care for nobody, no, not I, 
If none cares for me." 

DOROTHY KINNEY, A. B., Major— Chemistry. 

Denver, Colorado. 

Science Club (4), Chemistry Assistant (4), Denver University (2) (3), Dais, Eager Heart (4). 

"She has a stem look, but a gentle heart." 



Phi Beta Kappa. 



MARION LITTLE, A.B., Major— Mathematics. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 



Contemporary Society, Vice-President (3), President (4), Town Girls' Association, Secretary- 
Treasurer (3), Senior Representative (4), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3), Women's Athletic Association, 
Secretary-Treasurer (2). 

"When I'm asleep I'm wasting time." 



74 



ROBERT ALLEN HART, A.B., Major— Economics. 

Phi Gamma Delta, Alpha Kappa Psi. La Junta, Colorado. 

"77 doesn't always pay to express o)ie's thoughts, that's why I talk so little." 

EVELYN vSWINHOE ARKWRIGHT, A.R , Major— Biology. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Fortnightly Sketch Club (3) (4), Biological Peripatetics (4), Y. W. C. A., Dramatic Club, Town 
"Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit." 



Girls' Association. 



LORENA A. BERGER, A.B., Major— Romance Languages. 
Phi Beta Kappa. Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Nugget Board of Control (3), Girls' Glee Club (3), President (4), Vice-President Class (4), Ohio 
Wesleyan (1) (2), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3). 

"Her ways are ways of pleasantness." 

NORMA BELLE BRIGHT, A.B., Major— English. 
Golden, Colorado. 

Fortnightly Sketch Club (2) (3) (4), Junior-Sophomore Plav (2), Eager Heart (3), Student Govern- 
ment Board (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3) (4), Dais President (4). 

"With a smile for one and all, 
She passes quietly through the hall." 

BEECHER W. FAWCETT, A.B., Major— Chemistry. 
Pi Kappa Alpha Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Pan Hellenic (3) (4), "C" Club, Science Club, Track (1) (2) (3). 
"Men who undertake considerable things, ought to give us ground to presume ability." 

GLADYS A. GLENDENNING, A. B. 

Grand Junction, Colorado. 

Major — English. 

Hypatia Society, Vice-President (4), Factotum, Costumer of Girls' Dramatic Club (3) (4), Student 
Commission (4), Student Government, Secretary (2), Vice-President (4), Nugget Board (3), Colonial 




Ball Minuet (2). 



"It is better to wear out than to rust out." 



15 




SERENA MARY MelNTOSH, A.B., Major— History. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Hvpatia Society President (4), Chairman Make-up Committee, Dramatic Board (4), K. U. K. 
(3) (4)'. Junior Play (3), Sophomore-Junior Play (2) (3), Town Girls' Board (1) (2). . 

" Me for the heart-smashing stuff." 

ALICE VIRGINIA NEWMAN, A.B., Major— English. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Tiger Staff (4), Town Girls Board (3) (4), Mandolin Club Accompanist (2) (3), Euterpe Secretary 
(2), Girls' Dramatic Club, Y. W. C. A., French Club (1). 

"Hon 1 her fingers went when she marched them o'er 
The yielding plank of the ivory floor." 

ALBERT CLAYTON LYLES, A.B., Major— Chemistry. 

Manzanola, Colorado. 

Alpha Nu, Sigma Delta Psi, Kappa Beta Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Epsilon. 

Question Club, "C" Club, Treasurer (4), Mary Slocum Scholarship (3), College Orchestra (3), 
Track (2) (3), Hitchy Kow (3), College Band (1) (2) (3) (4), K. U. K, Science Club, Inter-Fraternity 
Council, Secretary-Treasurer (4), Class President (4). 

"/ never think my thoughts out loud, "You would all be at my feet 

"But if I did "With heads bowed." 

ELIZABETH KNOX, A. B. 
Fort Morgan, Colorado. 
Major — Biology-. 
Girls' Dramatic Club, Dramatic Board (2), Freshman Play (1), Industrial Experiment, Student 
Conference 1921, Dais Treasurer (4). 

" Far from the maddening crowd let me mam!" 

THELMA KAUFMAN, A.B., Major— Biology. 

Delta Epsilon. Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Girls' Dramatic Club, Town Girls' Association, Biological Peripatetics. 

"The girl to do her duty — and where to find her equal would be very hard to tell." 

CHESTER EDWIN SHAFFER, A.B., Major— Chemistry. 

Delta Epsilon. Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Science Club, Treasurer (4), Chemistry Laboratory Assistant. 

"I never with important air, 

In conversation overbear." 



T6 



EINO LEINO, A.B., Major— History. 

Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Kappa Psi. Telluride, Colorado. 

K. U. K., Editor Nugget (3), Assistant Editor (3), Editor-in-ehief of Tiger (4), Argo Scholarship, 

Treasurer Alpha Kappa Psi. 11T , 7 ,, , ,, • r ■. . , 

1 ' r 1 he world knows nothing of its greatest men. 

NINA BERNICE SHAFFER 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Major — Mathematics. 
Minerva Society Secretary (4), Science Club (3) (4), Women's Athletic Letter, Girls' Dramatic 
Club, Function Play (2), Mandolin Club (1) (2), Town Girls' Association Vice-President (3), President 
(4), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4), Colonial Ball Minuet (2). 

"Sing away sorrow — Cast away care." 

LUTIE VIOLET MARSHALL, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Mathematics. 

Minerva Society, Treasurer (4), Women's Athletic Board, Vice-President (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3). 

"Blessed with a temper whose unclouded ray, 
Can make tomorrow as cheerful as today. 

MARTHA CHRISTINA TUCKER, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Major — Romance Languages. 
Hypatia Society, French Club President (3), Spanish Club, Girls' Glee Club Treasurer (4), Stage 
Manager (3), Treasurer Hypatia Society (4). 

"A fair countenance is a silent recommendation." 

JENNIE MERLE LOVE, A. B. 

Fountain, Colorado. 

Major — Biology. 

Student Government, House President, Bemis Hall (4), Eager Heart (3), Dramatic Club (1) (2) 

(3) (4), Sophomore-Junior Play (3), Athenian Society (2), Dais (4), Y. W. C. A., Assistant Costumer, 

"Talk to her of Jacob's ladder and she would ask the number of steps." 

BEN S. WENDELKEN, A. B- 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Sigma Chi, Alpha Kappa Psi, Tau Kappa Alpha. 

Major — History and Political Science. 

K. U. K., Pearson's Dramatic Club, College Band, Debating (1) (2) (3) (4), Manager (3), Argo 

Scholarship (3), Hasting's Prize (3), Tau Kappa Alpha President (4), Class Orator (4), Enthusiasm 

Committee (4). 

"He adorns whatever subject he either writes or speaks upon, by the most splendid eloquence." 




77 




MARY CLEGG OWEN, A.B., Major — Business Administration and Banking. 
Phi Beta Kappa. Colorado Springs, Colorado- 

Minerva Society President (4), Inter-Society Council (4), K. U. K. (3) (4), Women's Athletic 
Board (2), Women's Athletic Letter, Athenian Society (2), Junior Play (3), Student Commission, 
Secretary (4), Tiger Staff (1) (2) (3) Nugget Board (3), Mandolin Club (1), Town Girls' Board (2), 
Y. W. C. A. Treasurer (3), Class Secretary (3), Manager Senior Minstrels. 

"Ah! You flavor everything! You are the vanilla of society!" 

ADNA ROMANZA CHAFFEE WARDWELL, A.B., Major— Economics. 
Sigma Chi, Theta Alpha Phi. Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Tiger Assistant Manager (2) (3), Manager (4), Pearson's Dramatic Club (2) (3), President (4), 
Pan Hellenic Council (3) (4), Student Commission (4), College Band (3) (4), Glee Club (2), College 
Orchestra (3), University of Washington (1), Junior Play. 

"How much the wife is dearer than the bride." 

FLORENCE MARION GREENE, A.B., Major— Romance Languages 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Nugget Board (2), French Club (3) (4), Spanish Club (2) (3) (4). 
"We are two travelers, Rob and I; Rob is my dog." 

Major- 



ROWENA K. HAMPSHIRE, A.B. 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

Minerva Society, Vice-President (4), Theta Alpha Phi, Girls 
man Play (1), Sophomore Play (2), Junior-Sophomore Play (2) 



-Romance Languages 

Canon City, Colorado. 
Dramatic Club, President (4), Fresh- 
. Function Play (3), Dramatic Com- 
mittee (3), Pearson's Play (4), Junior Plav (3), Student Commission (3), French Club, Vice-President 
(3), Girls' Glee Club (1), '(2), Y. W. C. A. First Cabinet (3), Manager Circus (2), Secretary of Class (4) 

"Little things are sweetest!" 



VERNON GEORGENE SCOTT, A.B., Major— Economics. 
Alpha Nu, Sigma Delta Psi. Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Track (1) (2) (3), College Band (1) (2) (3) (4), College Orchestra (2) (3), A. B. Club (4), Honorary 
"C" Club (4). Theta Sigma Pi, Cossitt Dining Association. 

"All things I thought I knew, but now confess 
The more I know, I know, I know the less." 

LOIS MILDRED GAULD, A.B., Major— Mathematics. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Girls' Dramatic Club, Chairman Properties Committee (4), Sophomore Play (2), Prunella (3), 
Y. W. C. A., Town Girls' Association (4), Dais. 

"She who takes a major in math, 
Must shun with care the social path." 



78 



HARRY FRANKLYN TAYLOR, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Phi Delta Theta, Theta Alpha Phi, Alpha Kappa Psi. 
Major — Economics. 
Pearsons Club Play (4), Junior Play (3), Hitchy Kow (3), Tiger Staff (2), Glee Club (2) (3) (4), 
Men's Christian League President (4), Alpha Kappa Psi Vice-President (4), Theta Alpha Phi Treasurer 
(4), President (4), Agustana College '17, University of Denver '19, Band (2) (3) (4). 
"/ am not a policeman, and my other habits are good." 

MARTHA CHRISTINA TUCKER, A.B., Major— Romance Languages 
1130 North Nevada Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

DELTA KATHERINE SCOTT, A. B. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Major — History. 
Athenian Society, President (3), Critic (4), Inter-Collegiate Debating Team (2), Girls' Dramatic 
Club, Sophomore-Junior Play (3), Town Girls' Board (4), Student Commission (4). 
"Tis strange ivhat a man may do and a woman yet think him an angel!" 

JOSEPHINE HELEN MILLER, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Biology. 

Spanish Club, Secretary Treasurer (4), Mandolin Club, President (3) (4), Girls' Dramatic Club. 

"Music hath charms to soothe the savage beast." 

JESSIE ELIZABETH MORROW, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Biology. 

Town Girls' Board (3) (4), Spanish Club, French Club (3), Biological Peripatetics (4). 

"Toil is the sire of fame." 

RALPH HANKINS, A. B. 

Ordway, Colorado. 

Kappa Sigma. 

Major — Economics. 

"As we journey through life, let us live by the way." 




79 




EARNEST JAMES SHEPPARD, A. B. 

Eaton, Colorado. 
Major — History. 
Track (2), Alternate Debating Team (1) (2), Senior Debating Team, Hagerman Hall Association 
Secretary (3), President (4), Treasurer (1), "C" Club (2) (3) (4), A. B. Club (4), Debating Team (4). 
"I am always in earnest; I will not equivocate; I will not excuse; 
I will not retreat a single inch; and I will be heard." 

SUOMA LEINO, A. B. 
Telluride, Colorado. 

Phi Beta Kappa. 
Major — Economics. 
Minerva Society, Factotum (3), President (4), K. U. K. (3) (4), Vice-President (4), Tiger Club 
President (4), Student Commission (2), Tiger Staff (2) (4), Nugget Board (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4), 
Class Secretary (1) (2), Honors (1), McAllister Scholarship (3), Girls' Dramatic Club, Freshman Play 
(1), Function Play (1) (2) (4), Dramatic Committee (4), Athenian Society (2), Eager Heart (2) (3), 
Coach Sophomore-Junior Play (3), Vice-President Girls' Dramatic Club (3). 

"She moves a goddess and she looks a queen." 

DELSIE MARGARET HOLMOUIST 
Ouray, Colorado. 
Major — English. 
Hvpatia Society, Factotum (3), Girls' Dramatic Club, Treasurer (2), Student Government, Sec- 
retary'^), President (4), Ticknor House President (3), Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (4), Home Coming Com- 
mittee (3), Manager May Festival (3), Inter-Society Council (4). 

"A shark at everything, and gets away with it!" 

GEORGIA S. EASLEV, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Economics. 

A and B Club. 

" The true, strong and sound mind is the mind that can embrace equally great things and small." 

ELEANOR ESTE BARTLETT, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Major — Biology. 
Contemporary, President (4), Women's Athletic Board, President (4) 
Education for Women, Wellesley College (2). 

"A real, live girl — the kind you like to know." 

A. B. 



Instructor of Physical 



ALLEN DORE RICE, 
La Junta, Colorado. 
Pi Kappa Alpha. 
Major — Chemistry. 
'But there's nothing half so sweet in life, as love's young dream." 



80 



NORMA BELLE BRIGHT, A. B. 
Major — English Golden, Colorado 

JOHN BARRINGTON JACKSON, A. B. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Phi Delta Theta, Kappa Beta Phi, Sigma Beta Kappa. 

Major — Economics. 

Football (1) (2) (3), "C" Club, Hitchy Kow (3), Chairman Enthusiam Committee (4). 

"He who flunks and runs away. 
May live to pass another day." 

MARJORIE EULALIA O'BRIEN, A. B. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — English. 
"Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire, called conscience." 

DOROTHY KINNEY, A. B. 

Denver, Colorado. 
Major — Chemistry. 

MALCOLM WILLIAM MacDOUGALL, A. B. 
Denver, Colorado. 

Phi Delta Theta, Alpha Kappa Psi, Sigma Delta Psi. 

Major — Economics. 

"C" Club, Question Club, Hitchv Kow (3), Manager All-College Picnic (3), Nugget Board (3) 
Assistant Manager (2), Football (2) (3) (4), Track (3). 

"None but himself can be his parallel." 



FRANCELIA ELDRIDGE, A. B. 

Golden, Colorado. 

Major — Biology. 

"Ever gentle, good and true, 

A friend to me, a friend to you." 




81 




FRANK NAPOLEON BRIGGS, Jr. 

Denver, Colorado. 
Phi Delta Theta, Kappa Beta Phi. 
Major — Economics. 
Question Club, Football (1) (2) (3) (4), Baseball (1) (2) (3) (4), Student Commission, Track (1) 
(2), "C" Club, Cross Country (2). 

"Hold the Fort! I am coming!" 

MARY HELEN KEMP, A. B. 
Colorado .Springs, Colorado. 
Major — Business Administration and Banking. 
Girls' Glee Club, Athenian Debating Society, A and B Society, Town Girls' Association, Girls' 
Dramatic Club. 

"Happy am I — from rare I'm free." 

CHIU-MING LIN, A. B. 

Fukien, China. 

Major — -Economics. 

A. B. Club. 

"I am a man, and nothing that concerns a man do I deem of indifference to me." 

IRA MITCHELL HICKS, A. B. 

Greenfield, Illinois. 
Alpha Nu. 
Major — Economics. 
Football (1) (2) (3) (4), "C" Club, Student Commission (4), "Hitchy Kow" (3), Tiger Staff (4), 
Tappa Club, Property Manager Junior Play (3). 

"Think not I am what I appear!" 

YU-CHI CHEN, A. B. 

Chingchen, Shansi, China. 

Major — Economics. 

A and B Club (4). 

"By the work one knows the workman." 

THEODORE B. NIX, Jr., A. B. 

Kansas City, Missouri. 

Major — Romance Languages. 

"The secret of success is constancy to purpose." 



82 



ian v. Mackenzie, b. s. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Major — Civil Engineering. 

Football (1) (2) (3) (4), All Conference (!) (2), Tennis (1) (2), "C" Club, Secretary (3), Question 

Club, Manager Junior Play (3), Hitchy Kow (3), Student Commission, Treasurer (4), Nugget Board 

(3), Manager Senior Play (4), Manager "C" Club Play (4), Nugget Board of Control (4). 

"A public man of light and leading." 

FRANCELIA ELDRIDGE, A.B., Major— Biology Golden, Colorado 

FAYE LILLEY, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Education. 

Hypatia Society, Theta Alpha Phi, Girls' Dramatic Club, Chairman Dramatic Committee, Girls' 

Glee Club, Town Girls' Board, (1), Freshman Play (1), Function Play (1), Sophomore-Junior Play (2), 

Junior Play (3), Coach "Prunella" (3), Vice-President Girls' Glee Club (3), Operetta (3), Pearson's 

Dramatic Club Play (4), Coach Operetta (4). 

"At whose sight, like the sun, 

All others with diminished luster shone." 

ADELAIDE FRANCES BROWN, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Philosophy. 

Hypatia Society (4), Sketch Club (3), Euterpe (1) (2) (3), Eager Heart (3), Dais (4), Student 

Government Board (4), Tiger Staff (3), Nugget Board (3), Girls' Glee Club, Secretary-Treasurer (2), 

Treasurer (3), Sophomore Representative, Town Girls' Association (2), Y. W. C. A. First Cabinet (3), 

President (4), Colonial Ball Minuet (2), Business Manager May Festival (2), Glee Club Operetta (2), 

"Smiles always; she has dimples, hence it pays!" 

OLIVE HAUN, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
Major — Biology. 
Secretary-Treasurer (4), Peripatetics Society 
Function Play (2), Prunella (3 



Athenian Debating Society, 
Club, Sophomore-Junior Play (2) 



(4), Girls' Dramatic 
Y. W. C. A. First Cabinet (4). 



'My tongue within my lips I rein; for who talks much must talk in vain. 

LOWELL OUTWATER COLLINS, A. B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Phi Delta Theta, Theta Alpha Phi. 

Major — Economics. 

President Theta Alpha Phi (4), A and B Club, Pearsons' Club, "C" Club, Junior Play (3), Columbia 




University (2). 



"Sentimental Tommy." 



83 



DONALD CHARLES McMILLAN, A.B. 

Denver, Colorado. 
Phi Gamma Delta. 
Major — Civil Engineering. 
) (3) (4), Captain Freshmen Football ( 1 ), Wrestling 



Football (1) 
"C" Club (2) (3) (4), Treasurer (2), Class Treasurer (3 
President Student Commission (4) 



Hitchy Kow (3), 
"Much may be made of a Scotchman if he is caught young." 



HOWARD K. LINGER 

Denver, Colorado. 

Phi Gamma Delta, Kappa Beta Phi. 

Major — Economics. 

Football (2) (3) (4), Captain (4), Baseball (3), Pan Hellenic Council, 
Representative to Student Commission (4), "C" Club Secretary (4), Social 
Committee (3), Chairman "C" Club, All-College Dance, Question Club. 

"Then come the wild weather, come sleet or come snow, 
We will stand by each other, however it blow." 



RALPH FRANKLIN ROUND, A.B. 
La Junta, Colorado. 

Kappa Sigma. 
Major — Economics. 

Assistant Manager Track (2), Men's Glee Club (3) (4), Pan Hellenic 
Council (3) (4). 

"He gave her a nice red rose, and walked up stairs." 



CHARLEvS RUSSELL BALL, A.B. 

Gill, Colorado. 

Sigma Chi, Kappa Beta Phi. 

Major — Economics. 

Question Club, Football (1) (2) (3) (4), Baseball (3) (4), Student Com- 
mission (4), Athletic Board (3) (4), "C" Club, President (4), Hitchy Kow (3). 

"Our business in the field of fight, 

Is not to question, but to prove our might." 



HARRY JACKSON NEWMAN, B.S. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Civil Engineering. 

Science Club (3) (4), Independent Club (3) (4), Vice-President (3), Pres- 
ident (4), Secretary Science Club (3) (4), Freshmen Football (1), Track (3), 
Assistant Physics Laboratory (3), Honorary Member "C" Club (4). 

"Providence provides for me, and I am well content." 

STUART YELDHAM ARMIT, A.B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Phi Delta Theta. 

Major — Economics 

Assistant Manager Football (3), Manager (4), Golf, "C" Club. 
"Great scholars are not the shrewdest men." 



LESTER CHARLES MacTAVISH, A.B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Beta Theta Pi, Kappa Beta Phi. 

Major — Geology. 

"To be great is to be misunderstood!" 

EARL E. LYONS, A.B. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Beta Theta Pi. 

Major — History. 

"I've lived and loved." 

ORLANDO ZEBEN McCOY, A.B. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Major — Economics. 

"A good heart is better than all the heads in the world.' 

EVERETT CLAY HANSARD, A.B. 
McMinnville, Oregon 
Major — Philosophy. 

"He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one, 
Exceeding wise, fair spoken and persuading." 



84 




Events 





SOPHOMORE BANQUET 

Tuesday, October 11, the Sophomores held their annual 
Banquet. It was held this year at Palmer Hall. In past years 
the annual Sophomore Banquet has been held at some of the 
local hotels, Manitou and Bruin Inn. The ceremonies took 
place in the Biology lecture room, where several skeletons 
watched guard. Thus in the words of the Sophs, "in peace 
we ate." 

The committee in charge, consisting of Ryan, Thomas and 
Thatcher, assembled the grub at McRaes and then concealed 
it in a garage near Palmer Hall to be brought in at 7 .30. At 
eight o'clock, small groups of men entered Palmer by the west 
door. 

The Freshmen, as well as a number of upper classmen, 
believed that the Banquet was to be held at Ramona Hotel, 
Cascade, and thence practically all the Freshmen made 
their way expecting to surprise the Sophomores and cause 
them to postpone part, at least, of the Banquet until a later 
date. 

In concealing their movements and the location of the 
event, the Sophs were very successful inasmuch as not a 
single Freshman was wise to the game. This was no discredit 
to the Frosh, however, for they did all that was in their power 
to have the event postponed. 



86 



INITIATION STUNT ALPHA KAPPA PSI 

It is a custom of the Alpha Kappa Psi fraternity that the 
pledges put on a stunt in Chapel which deals with an Economic 
or Business problem. This year they put across a playlet 
entitled "Back to Normalcy." This affair looked at from any 
angle was a success. 

Their lines had real wit, their farcial-take-offs were near 
enough to life to make the sketch, as a whole, interesting. It 
showed, with all its take-off, the inherent greeds of each social 
group. 

The characters were: Financier, James Park; Business 
Manager, Keith Chick; Capitalist, Ben Wendelken; Higher 
Learning, Russel Carter; Good Old Days, Harry Taylor; 
Einstein, Robert Mcllvaine; Devil, Elwood Amos; Suffragette, 
Charley Bemis; Religion, Malcolm Graham; Common Man, 
Myron Carter; and the Laborer, Malcolm MacDougall. 

These personages were seated around a directors table 
with the problem before them of getting back to normalcy 
without cutting any of the pie they were eating. The Financier, 
chairman of the board, gave the opening speech. He reiterated 
the time worn phrase of co-operation, hard work and more 
profits to all. The Capitalist was in favor of all changes which 
would increase his profits. The Manager was all for efficiency 
and co-ordination. The Suffragette with her cracking voice had 
the solution with women as business executives. The Parson 
treated the audience with a sickly smile. "Rah Rah" had the 
Salvation of Higher Learning. The Common Man wanted 
everything cheap. The Devil came in at this time and in- 
fluenced the Laborer to tell them all to jump in the lake. 
The Devil was pushed out and the Good Old Days entered. 
He explained that from the relative amount of business in the 
past and the future, the amount of present business might be 
determined. By this data and his brains a solution might be 
reached. This solution so disgusted the assemblv, that they 
adjourned. 





87 




CLASS SCRAP 

Following the Sophomore Banquet, the second Class Scrap 
took place in front of Perkins Hall immediately after Chapel, 
Wednesday, October 12. In this fight, the sophomores proved 
their ability by defeating the Frosh. Water was brought into 
play by the Frosh, by means of a three inch fire hose. Although 
the water was considered rather cool by the Sophomores, there 
was insufficient force behind it to dislodge the Sophomores in 
the tree who were guarding their flag. The use of the water 
also made the tree so slick that the Frosh found it difficult to 
ascend in order to displace the Sophs and capture the flag. 

Although the Frosh were defeated, they showed unusual 
ability and inspiration, and if their plans had turned out as 
they expected, it is probable that the fight would have termin- 
ated differently- It was a real fight from the beginning to the 
end and, although the Frosh were defeated, it speaks well for 
their chances of victory next year. 



88 



INSIGNIA DAY 

The Insignia Day exercises mark the beginning of the end 
for the Seniors. This is the first occasion on which they appear 
in cap and gown. The custom of entering the chapel through 
an arch of flowers made by the Juniors is rather impressive. 
The Juniors enter first in double file. The first two stop just 
inside the door and hold their flowers up so as to form the 
arch. The next couple add to the length of the arch and so 
on until the entire length of the center aisle is arched with 
flowers. The Seniors then enter and march through the floral 
arch to their seats. When the Seniors have all passed through, 
the Juniors "undo" the arch in the same way they put it up. 
The couple nearest the door pass through the arch and the next 
couple follows and so on until the last couple take down their 
arms and find their seats. When all are seated the Seniors are 
showered with the flowers and the chapel exercises begin. 

November ninth, was the date of Insignia Day this year. 
No particular date is kept from year to year but it is always 
some date before the Thanksgiving holiday. After the chapel 
service the Seniors forget their new found dignity and indulge 
in a game of "three deep" on the lawn. The caps and gowns 
are not laid aside for this part of the program and the stately 
ones present an interesting spectacle racing around the circle 
with their long gowns flying in the wind and their stiff caps 
bobbing off and on. 





89 




HOME COMING AND BARBECUE 

A large number of graduates were present at the Home 
Coming, October 28 and 29. The old grads were met at the 
trains by ears, placarded with "C. C. Home Coming" and were 
taken to their Fraternity Houses, Halls or Homes. Each 
graduate was given a card bearing his name and class. 

Friday, October 28, at eleven o'clock, one of the biggest 
parades of the year was held. In the afternoon the Fratern- 
ities and Societies held open house for their Alumni and friends 
of the College. In the evening the Sophomore class put on 
one of the best barbecues ever staged. 

Saturday morning at 10:30 the "Baby Tigers" defeated 
St. Regis College of Denver by a score of 7-0. This was fol- 
lowed by the alumni banquet at Bemis and Cossitt halls. 
Following the banquet, the alumni marched to the field with 
their own band and cheer leader, to their own section between 
the C. C. men and the C. C. women, where the Tigers mixed 
with the Aggies football team at 2 :30. 

Saturday evening the men banqueted at Cossitt and the 
women at Bemis, followed by the all-college dance at Bemis, 
which has been called the best all-college dance staged in years. 

The twenty-sixth Colorado College Barbecue was held in 
Cossitt Stadium Friday evening, October 28 under the direction 
and management of Russel Hunter of the Sophomore class. 
Directly preceeding the Barbecue was a pep-meeting featured 
by yells and songs by the student body and speeches by the 
Alumni. Talks were also made by the Coaches and members 
of the football team. 

Chuck Ball took charge of the meeting from then on and 
a regular tossing took place. Swede Jackson was the first to 
ascend and he was immediately followed by Les McTavish and 
Mai Graham. "Coach" Harrison was tossed for being a 
general nuisance. "Peanuts" Strong, Sam McCool and John 
Duniway were tossed for their inability to hold on to "their 
freshmen caps. 



90 



Y. W. C. A. CIRCUS 

The Annual Y. W. C. A. Circus was held in Cossitt Gym- 
nasium Saturday November 19. It was considered the largest 
and most successful Circus ever given at Colorado College. 

The SOS Band opened the ring stunts by playing "Coming 
Thru the Rye" and "Good Night Ladies." A troup of trained 
seals performed on roller skates. This was given by the Fresh- 
men class. The Juniors then gave their mock Chapel Exercises. 
The Ticknor Hall Football Team then came on the field. A 
rough game ensued and several heroes were knocked out, but 
with the aid of a sponge they were brought to again and the 
game continued. After the game, the Trained Horses accom- 
panied by a giraffe and an ostrich took the stage. Scenes were 
changed again and a thrilling movie was enacted by the Soph- 
omore girls. Then the ring became an arena and a genuine 
and gory bull fight took place. This was followed by an act 
by the acrobats. The Circus was terminated by a chariot race. 

In the side shows Tragedy of the Cannibal Isles and Blue 
Beard's decapitated wives were shown. There was also a 
fortune teller and a snake charmer. The clowns made them- 
selves generally conspicuous. 







91 




MAGNA PAN PAN 

The Magna Pan Pan was held in Perkins Hall Thursday 
evening, December 15. This was the last pre-Christmas 
activity of the college. It was the first pep-meeting held after 
the one preceding the Thanksgiving game and was attended 
by practically every student of the College. Each fraternity, 
club and dormitory displayed its talent in vaudeville on the 
stage. The local high school juniors and seniors were invited 
to attend. 

The program was as follows: 

The Pieing of Mushy Mike Moran (Melodrama in one act) 

Phi Delta Theta Fraternity 

Donaldson's Syncopated Battlers (Presenting Foremost Stars 

of the ring) Alpha Nu Fraternity 

Have You a Little "Nippah" in Your Home?. .Montgomery Girls 
The Human Organ (Eighth wonder of the modern world with 

apologies to Edison) Ticknor Girls 

The C. C. Follies Sigma Chi Fraternity 

Exclusive Pictures of Carpentier-Dempsey Fight 

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity 

Jack-in-the-Box McGregor Jumping-Jack 

Prof. Prevmoor Physic (the oracle of Thermopolis) 

Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity 

Lest Ye Forget (Accompanied by sweet memories) 

Independent Club 

Twin Eyes (World's most spectacular display of mastodonic 

splendor) Town Girls Association 

Cutler Shall Not Ring Tonight (by a bunch of dumb bells) — 

Beta Theta Pi Fraternity 

Prof. Willie Willie Wahoo (premier hypnotist of the world) 

Kappa Sigma Fraternity 



92 



ALL- COLLEGE PICNIC 

On Wednesday, February 22, the annual all-college picnic 
took place in the Garden of the Gods. This event, one of the 
time honored traditions of the college proved to be one of the 
most enjoyable affairs of the year. The attendance was large, 
the weather ideal and the "eats," excellent. 

The festivities began about noon. Some came in autos, 
some rode the street cars as far as possible and some hiked 
across country. 

The big event of the day was the faculty race. Prof. 
Gilmore, running with all the speed and grace of an Apollo, 
won this easily, inasmuch as he was the only entry. The 
freshmen challenged the whole school to a tug of war and won 
this after several minutes of pulling and tugging, owing to the 
fact that most of the upperclassmen had lost themselves before 
the event took place. The girls' race created quite a sensation 
— especially among the men. This event was won by Miss 
Ellis. MacDougall's team copped the centipede race. Coach 
Parsons was master of ceremonies. 

A dance at San Luis School topped off the program and 
ended the best all-college picnic C. C. has seen in many a year. 




93 




COLONIAL BALL 

On Friday evening, Ferbuary 24, the women of the college 
gathered together for their annual Colonial Ball in Bemis Hall. 
This was one of the big events of the year and one which was 
attended by practically all of the women of the college. Some 
of the fair coeds dressed to represent "The Great Father of their 
Country" who "never told a lie." One might have been sur- 
prised at the number of good looking colonial gentlemen who 
were the result of long hours of "fixing up." The rest of the 
girls, after much "piling up" and "powdering" of hair, and the 
donning of gowns like "grandmother used to wear," were com- 
mendable representations of George's wife. 

The hall girls and their guests marched into the dining 
room to the tune of America and took their respective places 
at the prettily decorated tables. 

After the dinner the town girls came and the Grand March 
was formed. Miss Phinney and Margaret Carter, led the girls 
into the common room from one side, and Mrs. McMurtry and 
Ruth Merrill from the other side. 

At about nine o'clock the dancing was discontinued while 
Eleanor Bartlett and Fanchion Croy gave an attractive dance. 
After this came the minuet, which was danced by Margaret 
Carter, Lorraine Moody, Dorothy Nyhus, Nellie Earnest, 
Lucille Lilvard, Catherine Hood, Adalaide Easley, Marie 
Bollinger, Ruth Little, Zella Brown, Betty Brown, Ruth Hutch- 
inson, Mildred Finlay, Clara Vorrieter, Edna Theobold, and 
Eleanor Bartlett who took the place of Martha Mae Kirk- 
patrick. 



94 



COLORADO COLLEGE MEN'S GLEE 
CLUB CONCERT 

The Colorado College Glee Club gave their home concert 
Saturday evening, February 4, at Perkins Hall after returning 
from their trip to Manitou, Fountain, Victor, Pueblo, Raton, 
N. M. and Trinidad. After the concert they left for the north- 
ern part of the state where they played at Denver, Greeley, 
Brighton and Monument. The concert was a success in every 
way, and was applauded by all who saw it. 

The program was as follows: 

Part I. 

College Songs Club 

Quartette — Harry Taylor, Theodore Winans, 
Gibson Winans, Carl Brumfield. 

La Paloma, Barcarole Orchestra 

Baritone Solo Theodore Winans 

Songs of Yesterday Club 

Tenor Solo Harry Taylor 

Popular Song Medley Club 

Trombone Solo Donald Hale 

Be My Love Club 

Barcarole Orchestra 

Violin Solo Ralph Heller 

C. C. Toreador Song Club 

Part II. 

Selected Quartette 

A Bit of Nonsense (Reading) Flwood Amos 

Chalk Talk Russel Mann 

Selected Quartette 

Banjo Solo Ralph Fmery 

Jass Orchestra Variety 

Reading Elwood Amos 

Finale Club and Orchestra 




95 




DRAMATICS 

The Dramatic Club of Colorado College is greatly indebted 
to both the Drama League of Colorado Springs, and to Mr. 
vSargent, for their interest and eo-operation in the work of the 
Club this year. 

The Drama League has taken an interest in all the activ- 
ities of the Club, and has given its hearty support. In January 
the League conducted the meeting at Bemis Hall, and gave a 
very interesting and valuable program. 

Mr. Sargent has given a big impetus to dramatics, to the 
spoken stage, in the College and in the town. His willingness 
to give freely his time and valuable ideas in matters of pro- 
duction has made him a much sought after man among the 
amateur actors. He is also the director of the Community 
Play House which is now under construction. Under the lead- 
ership of such a capable man as Mr. Sargent, this work is sure 
to prove a success. 

SENIOR PLAY, 1921 

"Polly with a Past," was presented by the Class of 1921 
of Colorado College on June 9, at the Burns Theater. 

Elizabeth Morgan, as Polly, was splendid in her role, .and 
handled her part with dramatic strength. She was well sup- 
ported in this by Ruford Blair, who, as Rex Van Zile, was a 
love-lorn youth of simplicity. The humorous situations were 
played in a very convincing manner by Monroe Heath, as 
Stiles, Kenneth Brown as Harry Richardson, and Angello Scott 
as Clay-Colum, Roy Brumfield as the temperamental musician 
was also to be highly commended. Evelyn Austin as Mrs. 
Clementine Davis, and Miriam Scribner as Mrs. Van Zile, 
gave excellent characterizations. Bernice Miles as Myrtle 
Davis was splendid. Then there was James McCool, last but 
not least, for he was a big part of the show and deserves a 
great deal of mention. 

Much credit for the success of the play is given to Miss 
Frances Schenk, the coach. 



96 



"SUPPRESSED DESIRES'" 

"Suppressed Desires" was given by 
the Dramatic Club at Cogswell Theater on 
Friday evening, October 21. 

The play was a comedy and the scene 
was laid in the Brewster Home. Henri- 
etta Brewster, a strong believer in psy- 
cho-analysis, endeavors to win her husband 
to her side. Mabel, sister of Henrietta, is 
visiting at the Brewster home. Henrietta 
finds that Mabel has a suppressed desire 
to leave her husband, while Stephen, her 
husband, has a desire to become the hus- 
band of Mabel. Mabel in the meantime 
takes up the study. Finally Henrietta's 
faith in the study is broken. Faye Lillev 
as Henrietta displayed the mystic look 
and tone of voice peculiar to that particular 
character. Harry Taylor, as Stephen, 
showed clearly his disgust of the science. 
His sarcastic phrases scored repeatedly. 
Rowena Hampshire, as Mabel, played her 
part exceedingly well. Her thoroughly 
innocent view of psycho-analysis was 
humorous and later in the play when she 
was crying at nearly every turn, she showed 
the exceeding wide range of her acting. 




97 




Attendants of O-gin-e-a-qua: 
Thelma Blaine Martha Sevitz 

Ethel Asbury Martha Kirkpatrick 

O-pe-ehe Leila Taylor 

Sa-kwe-en-ta Grace Garvey 

Na-ko-wa Eleanor Bartlett 

Aeorn Chorus: 

Ethel Asbury Thelma Blaine 

Eeila Taylor Marie Bollinger 

Jessie Spicer Mabel Sadler 

Elizabeth Knox 
Dancers: 

Martha Stewart Gail Beckman 

Ruth Hutchinson .Serena Mcintosh 



Chorus of Winds: 
Ellen Weir 
Frances Tucker 
Clara Vorreiter 

Helen 

Chorus of Opeche : 

Harriett Bumstead 

Eeila Taylor 

nu Elsie 

Chorus: 

Dorothy Barker 
Martha Tucker 
Mildred Finlav 
Jessie Spicer 
Ruth Hopkins 



Dorothy Graves 
Zella Brown 
Nellie Earnest 
Brown 

Marie Bollinger 
Dorothy Dorlac 
Baier 

Lydia Schilling 
Jane Brooker 
Nelle Hutchinson 
Joan Heckenlively 
Inez Maupin 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB OPERETTA 

The Girls' Glee Club gave for its annual 
concert this year, the Indian Operetta 
"Se-a-wan-a" which was a success in every 
way. 

The operetta was given in Perkins Hall 
on December 3, 1921, amid a woodland 
setting. 

The story is that of a Mohawk maid, 
Se-a-wan-a, who by placing a blue corn- 
flower in a white doeskin pouch conveys 
her assent to Nakowa's proposal. 

Ne-a-qua who also loves Nakowa ex- 
changes the cornflower for a nightshade 
blossom which means rejection. 

Nakowa, brokenhearted, scorns Se- 
a-wan-a who appeals to O-gin-e-a-qua to 
right the injustice done her. 

The court procession enters singing, 
"Justice, Justice, Give Her Justice." 
O-gin-e-a-qua questions the Winds of the 
forest, Wabose the hare, and Sa-kwe-eu-ta 
the snake, but they have seen nothing 
wrong. 

Finally she questions Opeche the robin, 
who has witnessed Ne-a-qua's treacherous 
deed. 

Ne-a-qua confesses her guilt which was 
done at the suggestion of the evil forest 
spirits. Se-a-wan-a and the others for- 
give her and the procession of the Indian 
maidens leaves singing the wedding song 
for Se-a-wan-a and Na-ko-wa. 

Cast. 

Se-a-wa-na Helen De Woody 

Ne-a-qua Frances Tucker 

O-gin-e-a-qua Ruth Pollock 



98 



THE CHINESE LANTERN 

Of course, the big affair of the year was 
the function play. This is the only pro- 
duction to which men are invited. As 
each member is entitled to a guest, the 
house is always crowded. 

This year the club chose a play which 
has greater literary merit as well as greater 
opportunities, for effective stage setting 
and costuming than anything given in 
college for a number of years. The ve- 
hicle chosen was "The Chinese Lantern," a 
charming fantasy by Lawrence Houseman. 

The story treats of the love affair of a 
little Korean slave girl, Mee Mee, who 
having been born under the Star, has the 
power of making her husband the greatest 
living artist. She had been sold and be- 
trothed to one Yunglangsti, the fat and 
indolent son of the artist Olangsti and his 
wife who is called Mrs. Back-of-the-House. 
Mee Mee loves the slave boy, Tikipu, and 
after three years of hard work and suffer- 
ing, she wins a return for her love thru the 
aid of the mystic picture within which 
dwells the spirit of Wiowani, ancient paint- 
er. Mee Mee and Tikipu elope much to 1 he 
consternation of Mr. and Mrs. Olangsti. 

Under the efficient management of 
Doris Haymes and the excellent coaching 
of Faye Lilley the play was assured of 
success from the first rehe rsal. Helen 
Wells was the property and stage manager 
while Gladys Glendenning and Lutie 
Marshall together took the difficult part of 
costumer. The Mandolin Club furnished 




music between acts. The refreshments 
after the play were in charge of Helen 
Armstrong, ably assisted by Edith Wil- 
liamson, Lorraine Moody and Gail Beck- 
man. 

Cast. 

Scene : in Olangsti's Studio. 

Olangsti, a Master of Arts. .Suoma Leino 

Mrs. Olangsti, His Wife . . Gertrude Klein 

Yunglangsti, His Son Tillie Vincent 

Student Apprentices and Craftsmen: 

1. Pee-Ah-Bee Katherine Morton 

2. Han-Kin Elizabeth Card 



3. Tee- Pee Dorothy Dorlac 

4. Hite-Titi Lydia Schilling 

5. New-Lynn Leila Taylor 

6. Nau-Tee Margaret Morris 

7. Li-Long Dorothy Masters 

Josi-Mosi, a Chinese Jew, Rag and Bone 

Merchant Lucy Fast 

Cosi-Mosi, His Brother, a Money 

Lender Rita Fist 

Tikipu, Bottle Washer and General 

Drudge Gertrude Sherk 

Mee-Mee, a Korean Sla' e-girl 

Rowena Hampshire 

Wiowani, an Old Master. . . .Ruth Pollock 



99 




Upper CHINESE LANTERN CAST. 
Lower— SLAVE WITH TWO FACES CAST. 



THE SLAVE WITH TWO FACES 

On February 17, the Girls Dramatic Club presented in 
Cogswell Theater, Mary Caroline Davies' allegorical play 
entitled "A Slave With Two Faces." 

The play sets forth the idea that one has it in his power to 
tiiumph over the conditions of life rather than be crushed by 
them. Life has two faces or aspects. If he is met with a 
commanding attitude, he becomes a cringing slave. If he is 
feared, he becomes a cruel master. There are two girls in the 
Allegory. The first girl never removes her crown in the pres- 
ence of life, and never loses her queenly, intrepid demeanor. 
Life is always her slave. The second girl succeeds for a short 
time in making life her slave, but finally yields to flattery and 
gives up her crown. She betrays her fear of Life to him, and 
he then whips and kills her. The play shows four other char- 
acters — a woman, a man, a young man, and a workman — who 
have been intimidated by life, and whom he drives across the stage. 

The Critic, Professor Goodenough, was well pleased with 
the girls' production of the play. He congratulated each of 
them on successfully portraying a mood or tendency, which 
represented an abstract character. 

The Cast. 

Life Dorothy Nyhus 

First Girl Grace Garvey 

Second Girl Betty Roseberry 

A Woman Irene McClelland 

A Workman Elizabeth Card 

A Man Nell Hutchinson 

A Young Man Anna Jane Hitchcock 

Coach '. Frances Tucker 

Manager Olive Haun 

Stage Manager Miriam Ellsworth 

Costumer Margaret Coleman 

Make-ups Catherine Hood 

Lights Erma Adams 

Music Sibyl Jellison 



100 



THE WONDER HAT 

"The Wonder Hat" by Ben Hecht and Kenneth Sawyer 
Goodman was the first of the monthly plays of the Dramatic 
Club and was given in honor of the freshman girls. It was a 
queer little one-act affair with a plot about a woman-hater 
who purchased from an old rag man a "wonder hat" which 
made him invisible; and a beautiful young lady who purchased 
from the same old man a slipper which made all men love her. 
Complications are bound to occur and they do. The play 
ends with a question — shall the little girl give back her slipper 
and the woman-hater his hat, or shall they keep them — and 
the audience is left to make its own conclusion. 

The part of Columbine, the young lady, was charmingly 
played by Dorothy Niccolls and Elise Burnett took the part 
of Margot, her maid. The owner of the "Wonder Hat" was 
Ruth Hutchinson and Catherine Crockett was Pierrot, her 
friend. Mary Morris was Punchinello, the old beggar and her 
pathetic wailings will long be remembered. 

Margaret Carter as stage manager arranged an attractive 
setting with a real fountain and cunning trees representing a 
section of a park. The moon shone realistically over a high 
stone wall. Gertrude Klein coached the production and Mary 
Clegg Owen was the general manager. 

Cast. 

Columbine Dorothy Niccolls 

Margot (her maid) Elise Burnett 

Owner of Wonder Hat Ruth Hutchinson 

Pierrot Catherine Crockett 

Punchinello Mary Morris 

Stage Manager Margaret Carter 

Coach Gertrude Klein 

General Manager Mary Clegg Owen 

101 




Upper THE WONDER HAT CAST 
Lower — THE CRIMSON COCOANUT CAST 



THE ONLY GIRL 

The Community Workshop at 426 North Tejon has come 
to be a very valuable asset to the work in dramatics. Its 
director, Mr. E. Benson Sargent, has coached most of the plays 
this year and deserves a large part of the credit for their success. 
He is a man with a great deal of experience in dramatics, both 
as a professional actor and as a coach. Mr. Arthur Bartlett 
managed "The Only Girl" and gave much of his time and 
energy in its production. He is one of the best boosters for the 
success of dramatics in the community. 

It is hoped that The Workshop may become connected with 
the College in some official way in the future. The work of 
public speaking and of dramatics could then be handled more 
easily and more efficiently. 

"The Only Girl," presented by members of the national 
dramatic fraternity, Theta Alpha Phi, and managed by the 
Community Workshop, should mark a new era in the history 
of local dramatics as it is the first production backed by both 
the community and the college. 

The play was given at the Burns Theater in May, with the 
following cast of characters: 

John Ayre Carl A. Brumfield 

Andrew McMnrray Lowell O. Collins 

Sylvester Martin Harry F. Taylor 

Alan Kimbrough Carmen Freyschlag 

Saunders Roy J. Brumfield 

Margaret Ayre Doris Haymes 

Jane Mc Murray Rowena Hampshire 

Birdie Martin Frances Tucker 

Patsy la Monlosc . Gertrude Sherk 

Friends of Patsy — 

Serena Mcintosh, Helen DeWoody, Catherine Crock- 
ett, Ethel Fay Asbury, Irma Patton, Martha Sevitz, 
Miriam Tessier. 



THE CRIMSON COCOANUT 

The Crimson Cocoanut was presented by the Girl's Dra- 
matic Club, Saturday, November 19. The play was a one 
act comedy and the scene was laid in a cheap restaurant in 
London. 

Lucy Fast played the part of an old waiter, and unlike 
most waiters was the center of attraction. Her comical re- 
marks and high pitched voice kept the audience in a never 
ending uproar. She didn't once forget the part which she was 
portraying, nor from all appearances, was she the least bit self 
conscious. 

The part of Nitro Glycerinski was taken by Marie Bollin- 
ger. vShe characterized the slv manner of the Bolshevist very 
well. 

Nitro was readily assisted by his wife which part was 
taken by Rita Fist. Miss Fist showed an unusual amount of 
dramatic ability. Both did well in perfecting the Russian 
accent. 

The part of Mr. Jabstick, the father, was taken by Margaret 
Morris. She made the whole room shake when she brought 
her fist down on the table and said, "I want my lunch, my 
lunch, waiter." 

Ruth Epsey played the part of Nancy, his daughter, very 
commendably. She made a most attractive young lady and 
one who was very much in love. 

Jack Pincher, the lover, was played by Irma Patton, who 
was indeed an ardent lover. He was by profession a detective 
and was very much engrossed in his occupation. 

Manager. Eleanor Bartlett 

Coach Gertrude Sherk 

Properties Edna Van Horn 

Make-up Serena Mcintosh 

Lights Mildred Finlay 

Costumes Marie Farmer 



102 



EAGER HEART 

For thirteen years it has been the practice of the Girls' 
Dramatic Club to present the charming miracle play, "Eager 
Heart," on the Saturday night preceeding the Christmas 
holidays. The play was written by Miss A. M. Buckton, an 
Englishwoman, and permission to produce it was obtained 
from the Eager Heart company of London. Miss Bennett's 
school in New York City was the first group to present it in 
the United States. Mrs. Sloeum, a friend and pupil of Miss 
Bennett, procured it for Colorado College in nineteen hundred 
and nine. Dean E. D. Hale supplied the music for the play, 
since the original script which had been ordered from London 
did not arrive, its loss being probably attributable to the Titanic 
disaster which occurred about that time. 

In Nineteen hundred and thirteen, "The Other Wise Man," 
by Van Dyke was substituted, but since it was not found 
satisfactory, no further deviation from the regular custom has 
since been made. 

"Eager Heart," was presented by the girls' dramatic club 
on Sunday, December 11, in Cogswell Theater. 

The story is of a young girl, Eager Heart, who prepared a 
simple feast and lodging hoping that she might house a royal 
guest that night, for the Christ Child was awaited. 

Winged angels appear thru a veil and sing praises to God. 
Christmas anthems and hymns are sung thru the play, at 
intervals. The star of Bethlehem guides the shepherds and 
kings to where the Christ Child lies in the humble dwelling of 
Eager Heart, and they lay their gifts at His feet. 

Eager Fame and Eager Sense, the sisters of Eager Heart, 
come too late to see the Christ and receive His blessing. They 
had gone to the city gates and to the palace where there was a 
great celebration for the King's coming. 

Noel, the Christmas carol is sung at the end of the play. 

Cast. 

Eager Heart Gertrude Sherk 

Eager Fame Ruth Pollock 

Eager Sense Ruth Spencer 



Joseph Helen Armstrong 

First Shepherd Winifred Moulton 

Second Shepherd Thelma Bradlev 

Old Man Thelma Burchfield 

Young Man Dorothy Jean Barker 

First King Marjory Collier 

Second King Dorothy Nyhus 

Third King Evangeline Joder 

Manager-in-Chief Florence Greene 

Coach Gertrude Klein 

Stage Manager Helen Wells 

Costumzr . Berniee Williams 

Make-up vSerena Mcintosh 

Lights Mildred Finlay 

Music Christine Miller 

Singers — Marie Bollinger, Leila Taylor, Nell Hutchinson, Helen 
Brown. 

A SPECIAL DELIVERY 

"A Special Delivery," was given by the Dramatic Club at 
Cogswell on Friday evening, October 21. The scene was laid 
in William Aymer's bachelor apartments in Philadelphia in 
1910. The play was a comedy and contained delightful 
repartee. The acting was more than could be expected. 

Coming as it did at the first of the season, it marked an 
unusual triumph for the club as well as a promising future. 

Although it was given immediately after the pep-meeting, 
and there were a number of other activities around the campus, 
Cogswell Theater was filled to its full capacity. 

Helen Thebus, as Marjorie, in her characteristic way was 
easily the star of the play. Her manner was graceful and her 
person charming. Lowell Collins as Aymer was a typical 
bachelor and did his part exceedingly well. 

In playing the part of Timothy, Jeff Wardwell, displayed 
both the enthusiasm and ambition of a young college man. 
In the character parts, Mr. and Mrs. Grice, both Carl Brum- 
field and Doris Haymes starred. 



103 




PAIGE BENBOW 

A new man with promise in debating with a good record 
in high school who showed up well against Aggies. He is a 
Freshman and has three more years to represent the black 
and gold. 

FRANK MAHAN 

Mahan has been debating for Colorado College for two 
years and has appeared in three inter-collegiate debates. He 
was manager of debating this year and captain of the team that 
went to Aggies. 

JOHN DUNIWAY 

Duniwav is a good man with no previous experience who 
shows promise of developing forensic ability. He handled the 
second affirmative speech at Aggies. 

CHARLES KIMBLE 

The old standby. Can be depended upon to make a good 
showing against any team. Shows more interest in the sport 
than anv other two men. Has debated two years for Colo- 
rado College. 

ERNEST SHEPPARD 

A Senior debating for the first time this year. Won his 
Tau Kappa Alpha key in the debates with Denver University 
and Lawrence College. A good man in debate on economic 
questions. 

BEN WENDELKEN 

Has debated four years for Colorado College. Was man- 
ager one year and has been captain of nearly every team he 
has been on. His ready wit and keen analysis has saved the 
day for his side in many a close debate. 



104 



DEBATING 



Colorado College is a member of a triangular intercol- 
legiate debating league. Denver University and Colorado 
Agricultural College are the other members. Every year a 
meeting is held at which representatives of each institution get 
together and select the question for the year. 

For the season of 1920-1921, the question was "Resolved 
that the U. S. should exclude the Japanese on the same basis 
as the Chinese." 

Colorado College divided honors in the league. The 
affirmative team composed of Charles Kimble, Carmen Frey- 
schlag and Robert S. Mcllvaine defeated the Aggies in Colo- 
rado Springs. The negative team, Reignensen C. T. Chen, 
John McClary and Paul Crowder were forced to yield to 
Denver University at Denver. 

Three debates outside of the league were held, using this 
same question. A negative team, composed of Ben Wendelken, 
Jack Dern and Charles Young were defeated by Cotner College 
and by Washburn College. While this team was losing, the 
affirmative team composed of J. Elwood Amos, Charles Kimble 
and Robert S. Mcllvaine met and defeated a team from Wash- 
burn in Colorado Springs. Thus the Tigers won two and lost 
three debates on this question. 

In addition to these debates one more was held, and that 
with Pomona College of California. The question was "Re- 



solved that the U. S. institute a responsible system of cabinet 
government." Colorado College held the affirmative. The 
team composed of Frank Mahan, F. Crowder and Hugh Fla- 
herty put up a good argument, but lost with the decision 2 to 3. 

The question for the league for the year 1921-1922 was 
"Resolved that the closed shop is justifiable." In order to 
select the teams a series of inter-class debates were held. The 
sophomore team composed of Charles Kimble, Jack Dern and 
Miller Mussey advocated the Industrial Court Plan of Kansas. 
The Freshman team, John Duniway, Paige Benbow and 
James Flaherty won the decision from them. The Seniors, 
Ian McKenzie, Ben Wendelken and Ernest Sheppard advocating 
the cancellation of the allied debt, lost the decision to the 
Junior team, Frank Mahan, J. Elwood Amos and Robert S. 
Mcllvaine. 

An affirmative and negative team on the closed shop were 
chosen from these two debates. The affirmative team of 
Ernest Sheppard, Charles Kimble and Ben Wendelken lost to 
Denver University and the negative of Frank Mahan, John 
Duniway and Paige Benbow lost to the Aggies. 

The affirmative team is scheduled to meet Lawrence Col- 
lege of Appleton Wisconsin, the negative to meet Washburn 
College on the issue of open and closed shop. 



105 




106 




'ATHLETICS 




11, 



=11 




&0 

JBv. larrp W&. OToobtoarb 

Jf rienb anb patron of &tfjletics, 
tofjo fjas, up Ijis untiring efforts in tfjc interest of 
tfje College, anb especially tfjru tlje bonation of Ijis 
mebical services, renbereb an inbaluaule assistance 
to &iger teams,— anb fjas gaineb tlje respect anb 
abmiration of all,— toe bebicate tljis department 
of &f)e J^ugget. 






IF 



m 






"C." CLUB HISTORY 



Ever since the giving of letters for athletic sports, there 
has been a feeling of co-operation among the men who were 
eligible to wear the coveted insignia. To the writer's best 
knowledge, one of the first times they were privileged to have 
a social function was in the spring of 1919. It was during this 
dance that Coach C. J. Rothgeb, better known as "Rothy," 
wore a pedometer. He claimed that during the fifteen dances 
he traveled a distance of more than eight miles, thus proving 
beyond a doubt that athletes should not dance the night 
previous to a contest. 

"Rothy" resigned during the summer of 1919. The col- 
lege at once secured the services of Charles L- "Poss" Parsons, 
who has since given the "Tigers" the name of "The Fighting 
Devils." This name was not given the "Tigers" by "The 
Fighting" Parson," as he was known at Iowa, but by the differ- 
ent state papers. The "Tigers" have never gone back on that 
name and it is sincerely hoped never will. 

He saw at once that in order to have the Tigers fight when 
necessary, they should have a place of proper recreation, far 
different from the gridiron, basketball floor, mat, ring, baseball 
diamond, or cinder track. 

His thought and ideas came to the ears of the business men 
of Colorado Springs, headed by Pete Woods, Pat Patterson, 
Bill Jones, Charles Shorb, Otis Mclntyre, L. P. Perkins, 
Governor Shoup, Dr. Woodward, Dr. Mullin, Dr. Schaefer, 
and Dr. Blackman, made contributions that enabled these men 
to furnish a luxurious club room. Because of their untiring 
efforts the club voted these men a paid up honorary life mem- 
bership. The college did its part by donating Julliard Hall 
and a pool table. 

Julliard Hall, always hereafter to be known as the "C" 
room, was redecorated and furnished with the fine furniture 
given by the Colorado Springs business men. It was then 
dedicated to the 1919 football team by the Colorado Springs 
business men. This was the team that won the championship 
of Colorado, and popular championship of the Rocky Moun- 
tain Athletic Conference. Harry Hughes, the coach of the 

109 



Aggies, said that the Aggies had no claim to the conference 
title after being beaten so decisively by the Tigers. 

This year the constitution and by-laws were made. Mem- 
bership in the club is the most coveted thing among the men 
of the campus. To be eligible to membership in the club, a 
man must win a letter in football, baseball, basketball, track, 
wrestling, boxing, tennis or golf. Honorary membership for 
one year is given to men who stay out for one sport for an 
entire season. This is the greatest favor done by the club for 
the men of the college to show aspirants that their efforts are 
really appreciated. 

Frank Kyffin, a baseball letter man, was the first presi- 
dent of the "C" Club. During the first year the "C" Club 
held an open house for the students of the college. The faculty 
voted to allow two functions during each college year. The 
"C" Club has been holding two of the best dances given by 
any organization, since that time. 

The next year, Roy J. "Butch" Brumfield, a football and 
wrestling letter man, was elected president. As usual, the 
"C" Club gave two of the best functions of the campus, besides 
instituting two new things on the college calendar, a smoker 
given to the business men of the city, and an original musical 
comedy, "Hitchy Kow." Everything was original, even to 
some very fine music composed for the occasion by Prof. Frank 
C. Palm. The "C" Club was requested by the Dean of Women 
to make the show an annual affair. 

This year Charles R. "Chuck" Ball, a football and base- 
ball letter man, was elected president. The first semester 
dance was very successful, and a second annual smoker was given 
December 14, 1921. The business men of the city are still 
talking about the fine entertainment given them. The mem- 
bers are looking forward each year to how they are go- 
ing to improve the next. The "C" Club of Colorado College 
is one of the biggest inducements to athletes in the conference; 
in fact, it is the only exclusive letterman club in the conference. 
The members of the "C" Club want to see the club grow and 
the college grow along with it. 










- - _ . '* 



* 







110 



"C" CLUB MEMBERS 



Secretary, Ian MacKenzie 



President, Charles Ball 



Treasurer, Albert Lvles 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



HONORARY' MEMBERS 



Allen 


Burghart 


Greiner 


Busey 


Hinton 


Scott, G. 


Amidon 


Carter, C. R. 


Harvey 


Carter, M. E. 


Mcllvaine 


Scott, V. G. 


Armit 


Dawalt 


Hicks 


Collins 


Mussey 


Thomas 


Ball 


Downer 


Jackson 


Corley 


Newman 


Young 


Bemis 


Fawcett 


Kessling 


Drake 


Rice 


Wyatt 


Briggs 


Graham 


Kief 


Fisher 


Saffold 




Lusk 


Mitterwallner 
Morton 


Park 
Patterson 








Eyles 






MaeDougall 


Muneaster 


Robinson 




LIFE MEMBERS 




McKenzie 


Nichols 


Ryan 


Bill Dotterer 


Pete Woods 


Pat Patterson 


McMillan 


Padget 


Sheppard 


Charley Shorb 


Dr. McKinney 


Bill Jones 


MacTavish 


Page 


Waiss 


Dr. Woodward 


Otis Mclntyre 


Dr. Mullin 


Wessen 


Wilson 




Dr. Schaefer 


Gov. Shoup 


Dr. Blackman 



111 




112 



C. L. PARSONS, Athletic Director 

"Poss" C. L. Parsons, in charge of athletics at Colorado 
College for the last three years, hails from the University of 
Iowa, where he was considered one of the two best athletes 
ever turned out by the Hawkeye institution. He won nine 
letters there, and the only man to follow in his footsteps is 
Aubrey Devine, All-American halfback for the 1921 football 
season. "Poss" won his letters in football, basketball and 
track. A man must choose between baseball or track, no man 
being allowed to enter both. Parsons was the second man to 
make nine letters at Iowa. 

Coach Parsons was a first lieutenant during the world war, 
was overseas for 18 months, and was wounded in action in the 
Meuse-Argonne. Upon his return he was employed at the 
Soldiers and Sailors club in Denver. He had left the School 
of Mines in 1917, late in the year. From Denver he came here 
to succeed Claude J. Rothgeb. 

"Poss" has turned out two championship teams since 
coming here — and this feat is going to be hard to duplicate. 
He is a hard worker and a heady coach. 

"SHORTY" DONALDSON, Trainer and Coach 

Harvey Donaldson came here from the Pacific coast. 
This is his third year at Colorado College. He was trainer and 
wrestling coach at the University of Washington under the 
famous Gilmour Dobie. 

"Shorty" holds the world's championship in wrestling title 
in the flyweight class. He coached both boxing and wrestling 
this year. 

HARRY HOLMAN, Football 

"Turk" was a first string end, and an all-conference one 
at that, on C. C. teams for four years. Was one of the greatest 
ever as a deadly tackier and a handler of the forward pass. 

Holman served as a first lieutenant during the war and 
saw action overseas with the 89th division. 

Harry has served two years as freshman football coach. 



BILL TWAY 

This was Bill's second year as assistant coach and line 
coach for the Tigers. Tway secured his football experience at 
De Pauw University, being a three-year letter man at that 
institution. During two of those years he was All-Indiana 
guard, which takes in Purdue, Notre Dame and Indiana 
University. It was due largely to his efforts that some of the 
Tiger line men made all-conference. He was responsible along 
with the other two coaches for instilling in the Tigers the famous 
"Fighting Devil" spirit, which made them capable of doing 
what was thought to be impossible, the defeating of D. U. on 
Thanksgiving day. 

HANK RFITSCH 

Hank was a new assistant coach for the Tiger football 
squad this year. He hailed from Illinois University, where he 
had played for three years under the famous football mentor 
Bob Zupeke. Besides this h'e played in the army under some 
of the best American coaches. His special duties were with the 
centers and guards, and the results of the seasons show that his 
efforts were not in vain. Besides being a football man in the 
Big Ten he was one of the best basketball centers in the Western 
conference. It is not known whether this man will be back to 
help coach next fall but without a doubt he could do the team a 
rieat deal of good. 

M. A. JFNCKS 

"Prof" took the freshman squad in conjunction with 
Coach Harry Holman and made a real team out of the Baby 
Tigers. He learned his stuff from John R. Richards, at one 
time director of athletics at Colorado College and now head 
coach at the University of Wisconsin. Prof, was a member of 
the Wisconsin squad for three years. 



113 




114 



II, 



,11 



LETTERS 



Baseball "C," height 5 inches, width 5% inches, width of 
letter 1 inch. Can be worn on coat jersey only. Awarded for 
five full innings in three or more games. 

Track "C," height 5}^ inches, width 4 inches, width of 
letter 1 inch. Can be worn on coat jersey only. Awarded 
for five points in a dual meet or a place in a conference meet. 

Basketball "C," old English type 5^ inches high. Can 
be worn on coat jersey only. Awarded for 80 minutes in four 
or more games. 

Football "C," 7 inches high, 7 inches wide, width of letter 
\]/2 inches. Can be worn on V neck sweater only. Stripes 
for football letter only, one for second year, two for third year, 
etc. Awarded for 90 minutes in two or more games. 

Wrestling, boxing, tennis, and golf letters worn on coat 
jersey only. Circular "C" 5 inches in diameter, 1 inch wide. 
vSmall initial letter indicating sport. Awarded for win by fall 
or decision in wrestling, win boxing bout by knockout or de- 
cision, win in singles or doubles in tennis, winning a match in 
a twosome of foursome in golf. 



w 



m 



TRACK SEASON OF 1921 



The University of Colorado proved to have the best- 
balanced track team in the conference. Colorado College 
finished a good second, and considering the material at hand, 
the showing of the Tigers was very good. State took the con- 
ference meet, 78^£ to C. C's. 27 J4, and the next closest rival 
was C. A. C. with 12 points. That about tells the story. 

An inter-class meet early in the season showed the soph- 
omores leading at the finish. The classes finished in this order: 
sophs, 46; frosh, 43; juniors, 29: and seniors, 5. 

In a dual meet with the Aggies shortly afterward the 
Tigers ran away easily. Results were compared by telephone, 
the Farmers holding their meet in Fort Collins. The final 
score was Tigers, 82; Aggies, 38. C. C. finished first in every 
event except the weights. Mai Graham stepped the century 
in : 10.1, the same time in which Naylor trimmed him at the 
conference meet. 

The Miners bowed next to the Tiger iron hand by a 2-1 
margin. C. C. ended up with a 85-45 score in its favor. C. 
C. took the great majority of first places, but the Ore Diggers 
counted their total on second places and firsts in the low hurdles, 
high hurdles, shot put, two-mile and half-mile. The lack of 
real competition prevented any good marks being made. 
Morton fought an uphill battle with Peabody in the mile and 
managed to beat him by a finish at the tape. Near the close a 
stiff breeze made the day a rather poor one for track. 

The University of Colorado trimmed us next, the final 
score being 88-34. It was nearly a clean sweep for the Silver 
and Gold. The only first places that went to the Tigers were 
the discus, which Muncaster took, 106 feet, 2}o inches, the 



pole vault, won by Carter, and a tie for first place between 
MacTavish and Graeber for the broad jump. For the first 
time in his long career as an athlete under the colors of the 
local High school and as a Tiger star, Mai Graham was forced 
to bow to another man in the sprints, Naylor of the University 
turning the trick. These two dash events were the features of 
the meet, held in the morning. The men ran a dead heat all 
the way down the track, and Naylor won by an inch — and not 
more. A bad knee, suffered during the previous football 
season, was noticeable in Mai's running. He seemed to wobble 
down the straightaway. 

In the conference meet Graham and Naylor split their 
events, the State star winning the century and Graham the 
220. Both races were easily the feature attractions of the meet. 
The time for the 100 was : 10. 1, and that for the 220, :22.3. The 
220 was the only event in which the Tigers took first place. 
Captain Kenneth Brown was out of the 440 with a bad leg. 
Patterson made a good showing in this event and ran a close 
second to Lee Willard of Boulder. 

Many of the track men were out their first time. Im- 
provement was noted in their work as the season progressed. 
Lyles showed well in the high hurdles, and in the field events 
Muncaster, Waiss and Fawcett took off points. The team had 
a few men who were mighty good in their respective events, but 
it lacked the balance that made State a strong and worthy foe. 

Among those who made their letters were Captain Kenneth 
Brown, Captain-Elect Mai Graham, Keif, Patterson, Bruce, 
Kesling, Lyles, Greiner, Waiss, Muncaster, Fawcett, Bemis, 
Carter, MacTavish, Morton, Nichols, Parks and Lusk. 



116 




117 




CAPTAIN KEN. BROWN 

One of the best 440 men ever turned out in Tiger- 
ville. A four year man in track. Could always be 
depended upon to bring home the bacon, both in the 
440 and as a member of the relay team. Ken never 
broke training. His services will be missed during the 
coming season. 

MAI, GRAHAM 

Captain-elect and one of the fastest century and 
220 men in the Conference. Although handicapped by 
injuries received during football season, Mai was the 
leading [joint getter for the Tiger cinder representatives. 
After a lay off in football last fall, Captain Graham is 
out for one of his best seasons. This is Mai's third year 
under Tiger colors. 

BRUCE KESLING 

Won his spurs in the half mile. A very consistent 
trainer who shows promise. He is a one year man. 
Will be back for more. 

PROCTOR NICHOLS 

Member of the relay team. His first year. Has 
a bright future, and with a little more coaching will be 
a contender in the quarter mile in any sort of Conference 
competition. 



KESLING 



118 



"STORMY" MUNCASTER 

Although just a Sophomore, he has already gained 
fame by his track and football ability. He put the shot 
and the discus, and with a little coaching will put the 
shot out of the state. 



"PINKEY" LYUvS 

A two year man, the war horse of the Tiger team. 
Pinkey not only pole vaulted, but ran the high and low 
hurdles and the two mile. Always a point getter. 
Will be back to get another crack at our opponents this 
year. 

"SWEAT" LES MacTAVISH 

For three years "Sweat" has been one of the most 
prominent men on the team. He was alwavs sure of 
a first in the broad jump, he also ran the 440 and was 
a member of the relay team. ".Sweat" is one of the 
greatest men in the Rocky Mountain Conference. 

"BUD" MORTON 

Always in the pink of condition. Won his letter 
through persistency. Bud has had no high school 
experience but he won his letter in the two mile in his 
junior vear. 




MUNCASTER 



LYLES 



LES MacTAVISH 



MORTON 



119 




"ANDY" WAISS 

A big boy who uses his size to advantage both in 
the shot-put, high jump and discus. Won his letter 
his first year. "Gump" can always be depended on for 
points. Is ready for a big year. 



GEORGE LUSK 

George won his letter in two broad jumps. The 
Black and Gold could always depend upon George and 
Les MacTavish to come through. Will not be back for 
the 1922 season. 



"PAT" PATTERSON 

A great natural athlete. Has a world of speed and 
endurance. Pat will set the Conference on fire before 
he grabs off his sheepskin. He runs the 440 and breaks 
the tape for the relay team. Pat gives Willard a great 
chase in the 440. 



"PEP" GREINER 

Perry won the low hurdles. He always showed the 
fleetest in the Conference the spikes on the bottom of 
his shoes. Perry is a one year man and will help the 
team to keep above water this year. 



WAISS 



LUSK 



PATTERSON 



GREINER 



120 



GEORGE KEIF 

Graham's running mate in the dashes. Good pace 
setter with lots of promise. Won his letter, first year 
out. Ineligible this spring on account of dropping 
school, but should make good in 1923. Gets off to 
flying start in sprints. 



"SKINNEY" COLDREN, Manager of Baseball 

Did a good job as manager of the squad. His wit 
drew many people to Washburn Field, to see the Tiger 
ball tossers perform. One of the tallest men who ever 
graced our halls. 



"CHUCK" FREEMAN, Mgr. of Track 

One of the most prominent men who ever walked 
the C. C. campus. Chuck was well liked by the men 
of the track squad. Worked hard and always for the 
interest of his Alma Mater. 



JIMMIE PARK 

Another man who showed his stuff in the relay. 
A conscientious trainer, has another season at Tiger- 
lair. Has a chance to show his wares this spring. 




COLDREN 



FREEMAN 



PARK 



121 




"PIKE" BRUCE 

Pike's all-year-round condition allowed him to win 
his mark on the track, where he was entered in the 880. 
Bruce may not be the fastest thing on legs, but he has 
a world of endurance and never faltered once. He sets 
his pace at the start and doesn't change it, with the 
result he is as fresh as a daisy at the tape. 



"RUSS" CARTER 

Russ never failed to win points in the pole vault. 
He showed up to advantage in the Conference meet by 
winning second place. This coming season will see him 
going big. 

BEECHER FAWCETT 

A three year man, always up to form and a con- 
sistent point getter. Threw the javelin. Beech will 
be with us for one more season. 



"CHUCK" BEMIS 

"Chawley" was a consistent point-getter in the 
high jump, and although this branch isn't fully develop- 
ed in the Conference the Tiger representative was 
always able to grab off points for the C. C. score sheet. 



BRUCE 



CARTER 



FAWCETT 



122 



BASEBALL SEASON OF 1921 



Coach Parsons turned out a good baseball team in 1921. 
The players showed a tendency to hit the ball hard at times 
and the fielding of the gang was commendable. Leo Downer, 
who worked in the box, was about the best twirler in the con- 
ference, and in some of the games he carried the real brunt of 
the attack, hitting the ball as well and keeping the opposition's 
bingles scattered. 

The team took its first game at Washburn field, downing 
the University of Wyoming, 7-4. Harvey caught a wonderful 
game. Incidentially, this boy topped all the conference stickers 
with a batting average well above the .400 mark. Downer 
worked in the box in the opening tilt. He pitched masterly ball. 

The second game went to the Cowboys the following day, 
6-4, largely because of poor work in the field. Clark Robinson 
twirled a good game, whiffing eight batters. His defense 
faltered at critical junctures, however. In this game "Blick" 
Bleistein, who was by far and away the best shortstopper in 
the conference, poled out a long hit that went for a homer. 
Bleistein's favorite spot for his circuit clouts was in right field, 
and the old sphere certainly did whiz down the line like a shot. 
In this second game Ball banged out a pair of pretty hits. 

Boulder came here next and took away the long end of a 
11-4 score. The Tigers made nine errors, seeming to be in a 
bad streak of bobbling. The errors came at opportune times 
for State, and the silver and gold took advantage of them. 
Bleistein made two brilliant catches, one while sitting on the 
ground near right field. Blick covered a world of territory 
that day and took everything within miles. Willard worked 
in the box for Boulder. Charley Ball hit at the right time and 
drove in two runs with as many bingles. Wessen, Harvey, 
Amidon and Briggs hit well that day. 

The Denver University Ministers drubbed the team at 
Denver in the next battle. The final score was 6-3. The Skv 
Pilots were pretty lucky, at that, for Frank Briggs fell in a 
chuckhole in right field and an easy single went by for a home 
run and the winning tallies. Harvey was the hitting star, 
getting three pretty ones. McKenzie opposed Downer on the 
mound. It was a hard game for Downer to lose. The slabmen 

123 



were sending them back to the bench in rapid order, however, 
and were on equal terms. 

Colorado Agricultural college bunched hits on Frank and 
Robinson and took the first game of a double header, 12-6. 
It was a ragged contest. The Farmers outhit us and deserved 
the battle. C.C.got only seven hits, all scattered, off Healy. 

In the second game Downer found the Tiger team going 
well, and aided by good playing he managed to whitewash the 
Aggies, 8-0. Bleistein, at shortstop, handled nine chances at 
short without an error, and he took some mighty hard chances, 
too. His fielding and the pitching of Downer featured the 
exhibition. Harvey and Downer slapped the apple on the nose 
for triples. Ball had a busy day in the field and gathered in 
six flies without any difficulty. Downer let the visitors down 
to three hits. Harvey caught a splendid game and displayed 
some pretty headwork. 

The Miners came here and ran off with a 15-9 score. The 
Blasters made 13 hits off the Tiger pitchers, hitting Robinson 
and Downer equally hard. MacDougall played a pretty game 
in the field and handled six hard chances. The Tiger captain 
speared one pretty one in short right. Bleistein made two 
triples, and Amidon started one double play. Five runs in 
the fourth inning proved the downfall of the team. The game 
was rather ragged all the way thru. C. C. got to Henderson, 
the Mines pitcher, and Worden had to be sent in to save game. 

In the last game of the season — this is good to tell, listen: 
Howard Linger, who had been whiffing the breeze for more than 
two weeks, stepped up to the plate in the eighth inning, and 
with the bases choked, pelted one of Williams' inshoots over 
the left field fence at Gamble field. At this time the score had 
been 4-2, with State leading. The hit put C. C. in the lead and 
the team won. That hit was enough to win on, but the Tigers 
continued to hit, and ended up with the best side of an 8-5 
count. The Tigers made only one error and Downer kept the 
hits scattered. Willard, however, banged out two four sackers. 
Linger made three hits in this game and handled nine putouts 
at first base. Briggs collected two hits. Captain MacDougall 
played a fast game at second and handled seven chances. 




DON MacDOUGALL 

Captain and keystone saeker. Flashy fielder, was 
Don, and a dangerous man at the plate. Don was also 
one of the best base runners in the Conference. Played 
three years in the Tiger nine and will be missed greatly. 



"CHUCK" BALL 

Charley snared them in the outfield in major 
league style and was a good baserunner. Pulled off 
several shoe strings and running catches in the shade 
garden. Chuck also pelted the ball for a good average. 

GEORGE FRANK 

Substitute pitcher helped the Tiger swatters out 
of many holes. With a little more experience and 
coaching, he will be able to send the best of them back 
to the bench, wondering what it is all about. 

LEO DOWNER 

Best hurler in conference going. Won two of his 
games almost single handed. Had a world of stuff and 
a good head. Downer really kept the Tigers in the 
race by his pitching. Will not be back, and his absence 
is keenly felt. 



MacDOUGALL 



DOWNER 



124 



"PIKE" BRUCE 

First Baseman, one of the coolest men on the team. 
Pike made many an opposing pitcher wonder why he 
left home. Played errorless ball; will be back this 
season. 

"GOB" HARVEY 

Did a good job of receiving, and besides being a 
good catcher, he led the Conference batters with an 
average of over .400. Gob has three years more with 
the Tiger nine. Harvey hits with men on bases — 
which is the real test of a batter. 



"HEAVY" LINGER 

Played first base and found his batting eye just in 
time to slam out a home run with the bases jammed at 
Boulder. Linger was so exhausted after this that he 
had to take time out. Will not be back. 



"BLACKIE" AMIDON 

Al proved to be just about the best third sacker in 
the Conference. Mighty good sticker, this boy, and 
a sensational fielder. Amidon hit for a mark above 
375. Will be one of the strong cogs in this years lineup. 




BRUCE 



HARVEY 



LINGER 



AMIDON 



125 




"SLANT" BRIGGS 

Played four years in the sun garden. Unqualifiedly 
the best man in the Conference on the paths. Has a 
great throwing arm to catch men at the plate. A .366 
hitter and a faultless fielder. This ends Slant's athletic 
career in college. 



CLARK ROBINSON, Pitcher 

This man played in hard luck, having a sore arm 
most of the playing season. Will be one of the Bengals 
most dependable men this season. Beat Wyoming in 
the first game with his "Slow Ball." 



KD PATTERSON 

Cavorted in centerfield a la Cobb and Speaker. 
You can't put any past "Pat." Covers acres of terri- 
tory and catches them in any position. It was his 
first year on the team, too. 



"SWEDE" WESSON 

Ability is thine, lad, "Swede" is a terrific fence 
buster and kept the carpenters busy repairing smashed 
gates. He is going to poke them out long and often 
this spring. Played the outfield in great shape. 



BRIGGS 



ROBINSON 



PATTERSON 



WESSON 



126 



FOOTBALL SEASON OF 1921 



While the season was not a success, as scores go, there is 
one thing that may be said, that is that no team in the confer- 
ence at any time outfought the Tigers. Coach Parsons instilled 
a real, honest-to-goodness spirit of do or die. 

Grand Island College of Nebraska came here first and took 
a 27-7 beating. Things looked good. It was an early-season 
game, and several sets of backfield and line men showed up well. 

The University of New Mexico came next and was defeated 
7-0. This was a good contest, but marred by ineffectual line 
bucking upon the part of C. C. The Tigers had several oppor- 
tunities to score and threw them away. Andy Waiss carried 
over the only touchdown and Captain Linger booted a goal. 

The following week the Tigers went to Laramie and trim- 
med the Cowboys, 10-0. Wyoming showed a stubborn de- 
fense, but Captain Linger, in the second half, swiped a forward 
pass and ran 50 yards for the only touchdown. Linger also 
booted a placement from the 40-yard line. "Heavy" was so 
exhausted from his long run, however, that he had to pass up 
the opportunity to kick the goal from touchdown. 

The University of Utah took a heart-breaker the following- 
week, 14-3. That seemed to be the end of chances, somehow. 
From that game the team failed to show its old strength. 
Perhaps that strength was never there, but the battle with the 
Mormons was one of the fiercest ever played on Washburn 
field. At the half the score was 0-0. In the third quarter 
Utah earned one touchdown, but they had to fight for it. 
The defensive strength of the Tiger team never showed to better 
advantage. Briggs played his greatest game. Nothing went 
around him. Shortly after that first touchdown the breaks 
turned against C. C. A fumbled ball was snatched up by 
Evans on the 5-yard line for a second Mormon touchdown. A 
few minutes before the close Captain Linger booted a pretty 
placement from the 40-yard line for the only Tiger points. 

The University of Colorado's "wonder team" got a terrible 
scare the following week. The game had no sooner started 
than Andy Waiss had scooped up a fumble and raced 70 yards 



for the initial touchdown. The only other Tiger score was 
made late in the game. The final score was 35-14. Passes for 
35-40-45 and once 50 yards, Muth to Franklin, beat the Tigers. 
At actual scrimmage the Tigers more than held things even. 
Before the game C. C. was not conceded a chance. 

The Miners took us to a trimming at Denver the following 
week, 7-0. The Tigers had opportunities to score but did not 
make the most of them. It was the first game the Ore Diggers 
had won in years — since Parsons left them in 1918. Several out- 
standing errors — caused b}' inexperience, enabled the Miners 
to finallv nose out — C. C. making any number of bad plays. 

The last game here with Denver University was one of the 
season's surprises. It was the only real surprise, for that 
matter. The Ministers, conceded to be one of the two best 
teams in the running, bowed to the tailenders, 28-21. This 
game allowed C. C. to nose out the Miners for sixth place. 
With Ball at quarter and McMillan at half the backfield found 
itself. The line opened huge gaps, thru which tore a fast- 
charging quartet. The Tigers cracked 'em early and continued 
the pace. The team marched 60 yards down the field thru the 
much heralded D. U. defense. Ball, McMillan, Muncaster, 
Downer, Burghart, Briggs, Linger — the whole team outplayed 
the Ministers at every angle of the game. 

Coach Fred Murphy of D. U. said the Sky Pilots were over 
confident. Possibly that was so, but in any frame of mind they 
might have been — they would have been beaten. It was one 
day in the year when the men, many of whom played their 
last game, were out for blood. It was a good team that had 
to take C. C. revenge, but it was clear-cut and decisive. 

The Utah Aggies won the title, and the U. of C. was next. 

"Bubbles" Mitterwallner was the only man to make a 
place on the all-conference team. Captain Linger, however, 
received votes from Coaches Corbett, Murphy, Parsons and 
Hughes. Briggs, counting first choices only, also placed. Mac- 
Kenzie, Downer and a few others received votes from coaches 
and the newspapers. 



127 




CAPTAIN HOWARD LINGER 

Played his third year with the team and was 
the choice of some newspapers for all-conference 
position. "Heavy" put in several points in the 
Tiger total with his goals from the field. Linger 
is an aggressive player and proved to be a capable 
captain for the eleven. 



Captain-Elect HAROLD WAISS 

This is his third year on the team. Put up a 
great game in the line and was a vicious tackier. 
Was the choice of some newspapers for all-con- 
ference. "Andy" never got ruffled in a game in 
his life. Scored the first touchdown against 
Boulder by running 70 yards after intercepting 
a State pass. Will be a mighty efficient field 
captain this fall. 



CAPTAIN LINGER 



CAPT. -ELECT WAISS 



128 



HOWARD MUNCASTER 
"Stormy" has the weight and aggressiveness to 
make a whirlwind lineman, and during his time in the 
game in 1922, he showed natural talent. Played ex- 
ceptionally well in the D. U. fray and opened holes 
wide enough to drive a horse thru and then have room 
to spare. Hard-hitting and one of the certainties for 
this year. 

ian Mackenzie 

"Kenz" made all-conference two years and was 
one of the grittiest players who ever wore a Tiger suit. 
Played against difficulties in injuries, but he never left 
the battle for an instant. MacKenzie cracks 'em and 
hits 'em hard, and he has been a bulwark in the lines 
of C. C. teams for the last quartet of years. 

PERRY GREINER 

"Pep" jumped into prominence at fullback and 
played a good game until the Mines skirmish, when a 
hard tackle put his shoulder out of place. He was 
perhaps the best punter in the conference and got his 
kicks away to a lofty spiral that enabled the ends to 
get down under the ball and grab their man. Back 
this year. Should develop into one of the best. 

EDWARD PATTERSON 

Pat played his first year at halfback, and tho he 
was inexperienced he showed flashes of form that bid 
well for his showing this season. He possesses natural 
ability and can be made into a valuable man with more 
coaching. Good on the receiving end of the forward 
pass. Should make all-conference before he leaves here. 




MUNCASTER 



MacKENZIE 



GREINER 



PATTERSON 



129 




MAX WILSON 

"Stoop" was the human octopus at grabbing the 
runner, and he could get thru and smear things in 
terrible fashion. He was a plugger and managed to 
break thru the line with regularity. Came here from 
the University of Pennsylvania, where he was a member 
of the freshman team. Unfortunately, he will not be 
back, having left school. 

EARL HARVEY 

"Gob" is a dependable end, and one that has made 
good. He was injured in the Wyoming game and had 
bad luck the rest of the season. This put the clamps 
on his work and forced him from the game. This year 
he is due to round out a slashing line. He's a good 
tackier and a very valuable offensive cog. 

BOB BURGHART 

Bob earned a regular position at halfback his first 
season out, and in the Boulder game he showed at his 
best, being the most dependable man in the C. C. 
backfield on the old off-tackle buck that was used so 
often in that battle. Burghart weighs a little over 155 
but is fast and is a natural charger. Much is expected 
of him next fall. 

MAE MacDOUGALL 

Played three years with Tiger teams, and at end 
handled the forward pass in good fashion. The "fight- 
ing Scotchman" had a glower that always put the fear 
of God into the hearts of the opposition. Last year 
with the team. 



WILSON 



HARVEY 



BURGHART 



MacDOUGALL 



130 



LEO DOWNER 

Mighty good forward passer and good kicker. 
Took Greiner's place after the Mines game and showed 
up well against both the Miners and D. U. Left school 
and thus deprived the school of a standby for next year. 

TED WESSEN 
Played his second year with the Tigers and did a 
mighty sweet job of defensive work in the line. "Swede" 
is a born football player, has the heart and is one of the 
most deadly tacklers and blockers in the conference. 
Quick to diagnose the attack and get his man. He is 
light but this seems to be no handicap whatsoever. 

DON McMILLAN 
"Runt" played four years and was known as a 
fightin' fool. He never really found his position until 
his last game as a Tiger, when at halfback against D. 
U., he plowed thru the Minister line for one gain after 
another. He is one of the hardest line smashers that 
ever wore the Black and Gold. 

JOE BRUCE 
Pike is a rangy end whose basketball knowledge 
enabled him to bring down forward passes in great 
shape. Also substituted at quarterback and ran the 
team well. A four-letter man with a real fighting 
spirit and worlds of experience. Can be depended 
upon to be with us for a few more years. 




DOWNER 



WESSEN 



McMillan 



BRUCE 



131 




BRIGGS 



MITTERWALLNER 



PARSONS 



FRANK BRIGGvS 
Three years for all-conference, and perhaps the 
greatest end the Tigers have ever had. Briggs was in 
the thick of every play and was a deadly tackier. His 
most phenomenal game, perhaps, was against the Uni- 
versity of Utah last year, when he stopped everything 
around his position and went back to get men starting 
in their tracks. "Slant" has ended his football career, 
and he will be greatly missed this fall. His name is 
engraved in football's hall of fame forever. 

CHUCK BALL 
Played four years with C. C. football teams, and 
despite frequent injuries he was a valuable man in the 
backfield. Ball was a hard hitter and a good defensive 
man. He played against some of the best teams of the 
last four years and wound up his career in a blaze of 
glory, when, as quarterback, he directed the Black and 
Gold to a crowning triumph over Denver University. 
This game marked the highwater of Chuck's gridiron 
performance and his loss is going to prove a serious one. 

MERWIN MITTERWALLNER 
"Bubbles" came down here from Boulder and the 
205-pound tackle proceeded to make all-conference his 
first year out. He was the unanimous choice of the 
coaches for his position. His game improved from the 
first game on, and against D. U. he was at his best. He 
is equally good on the offense and defense and will be 
one of the bulwarks of the 1923 team. 

COACH C. L. PARSONS 
"Poss" has been with us for three years and has 
turned out two championships in that time, one, the 
1919 Colorado title in football, and this year the Rocky 
Mountain conference basketball gonfalon. With so 
small a school this is by no means an easy achievement. 



132 



BASKETBALL SEASON OF 1922 



After the University of Colorado had held the Rocky 
Mountain conference basketball championship for four suc- 
cessive years it fell to the Colorado College Tigers to turn the 
tide against the State warriors and trim them twice, once on 
their floor, and once here, a feat that had not been accomplished 
for many years. Boulder claimed that their hard luck down 
here was due to glass backboards. They were beaten by only 
three points, 36-33. So a few weeks later the Bengal tribe 
journeyed to State's stamping grounds and gave Coach Mills' 
aggregation an unmerciful walloping, 42-25. This just about 
settled the glass backboard howl. At least, we haven't heard 
of it since. 

To begin the season — Denver university came under the 
hatchet in the first game, 49-26. The Ministers had a prayer 
and one good forward. After the first team had run up a 
score giving a comfortable margin the subs were ushered in 
and completed the slaughter. 

Colorado Aggies, the big boys from Fort Collins, the lads 
who squelched the last, fading hopes of the Miners for a tie 
for the title, came next and took a trimming. The score was 
31-11. The guarding of the Farmers was good, but their 
shooting was nil against the Tiger defense. 

The Aggies came next at Fort Collins, and they gave the 
Bengals a real scare. Bruce, playing under the handicap of 
a high fever, made the longest shot recorded in conference 
annals when he stood under the Aggie basket and put one in 
from the entire length of the floor. This changed the tide of 
battle and we won by a last minute spurt. The score was 3 1-24. 

Wyoming came next at Laramie. Playing on a narrow 
floor the Tigers utilized the disadvantages in their favor and 
won handily, 43-11. The Cowboys said they had never wit- 
nessed such a passing game. Their five-man defense failed to 
work and they were at a loss to cope with the onslaught. 



The School of Mines lost the next battle. It was close, 
32-23, and the next night they turned the tables, 37-28. Both 
games were the roughest of the year, but at Golden. Art Bunte 
began to use his "rabbit foot" and shot 'em over his head, 
while sitting on the floor — and so the Miners evened up. 

Boulder lost down here, 36-33, due to a last-minute rally 
by the Tigers. They howled their protest, but a week later 
they had to swallow their words when the Bengal tribe turned 
and dealt revenge, 42-25. It was a demoralized State team 
when the Tigers attack started its work. It was a complete 
rout for Boulder and it ended a very disastrous season for them. 

Going on to Denver, the Tigers wound up the year with a 
45-25 victory. Denver scribes adjudged the team the greatest 
that had played on a conference floor in years. Nothing but 
praise came from fans who saw that game. It was rough but 
fast. Bowman starred for Denver, but he was not good enough 
for five men. 

To Coach C. L. Parsons goes a great deal of credit for the 
success of the team. He stuck to what he believed was the 
best system of basketball — and truly it was. At Kansas City, 
where the Tigers were entered in the national open tournament, 
Indianapolis won, 45-42, but it was a hard-fought game, and 
the Hoosiers later proved to be one of the three best teams 
entered. That is a tribute to Parsons' coaching and a credit 
to the playing of each and every member of the conference 
champions. 

The final standings: 

Team P. W. L. Pts. Opps. Pet. 

Colorado College 10 9 1 380 221 .900 

School of Mines 10 8 2 341 252 .800 

Denver University 10 4 6 227 312 .400 

University of Colorado 8 3 5 302 330 .375 

Colorado Aggies 10 3 7 190 236 .300 

Wyoming University . . 8 1 7 134 248 .125 



133 




CAPTAIN-ELECT EARL HARVEY 

"Gob" was selected all-conference guard on the second 
team. He played a standing guard. Harvey is hard to elude 
and an air-tight defensive man. He is a consistent, hard-play- 
ing and always dependable man, and his weight and strength 
proved to be a mighty obstacle to opposing forwards. He was 
a unanimous choice for the captaincy and deserved his place 
bv his work during the 1922 season. 



CAPTATN LESTER MacTAVISH 

Played four years with the Tigers and was adjudged one of 
the best centers in the conference. Was given all-conference 
second team choice by a vote of the coaches. A wonderful 
jumper, fast and an excellent floor man, perhaps the best in 
the conference with regard to this last department. As cap- 
tain of the Rocky Mountain conference champions, Les gave 
everything he had, sacrificed individual work, and was a steadv 
and capable leader. This is his last year, and his shoes are go- 
ing to be hard to fill. 



JOE BRUCE 

Pike also made 120 points for the Tiger team this year and 
was chosen all-conference forward. His "get a man," and 
"hook 'em," could be heard thru the gym during every game. 
That was typical of his fighting spirit and slashing play. Was 
everywhere at once, and there isn't any trick of the game he 
doesn't understand. His never-miss shots under the basket 
made him a sure bet, no matter how close the battle. His 
long shots also featured a great team attack. Has played two 
years and has two more to go. Should make all-conference again. 



; HARVEY 



MacTAVISH 



BRUCE 



134 



ROBERT ALLEN 

Came from Wheatridge High School, 
where he had established an enviable rep- 
utation for his unerring shots. Ran wild 
against the University of Wyoming down 
here and hung up 25 points, enough to 
beat the Cowboys unaided. He is a 100 
per cent, machine in the art of hanging 
up free throws, never missing. 

FRANCIS RYAN 

"Swede" played a wonderful game at 
running guard. He can go up above the 
basket to take rebounds, pass with either 
hand, and do it accurately, and is a flash 
on both offense and defense. In his place 
he was a great cog of a fast-moving ma- 
chine. Made all-conference and deserved 
it. It was his second year and he will live 
up to expectations for two more. 

ED PATTERSON 

Pat rolled up 120 pounds during the 
season, and could locate the basket from 
either long or short distance with deadlv 
accuracy- Plays a great floor game, is 
fast, and a natural basketball man. Was 
selected all-conference by almost unani- 
mous vote of the coaches. 

ED RYAN 

A pocket-size edition of his brother, 
"France." Just about as good, and that 
is saying a great deal. This was his first 
year, and in the three years remaining he 
should get an all-conference berth. His 
type of play is a slashing, whirlwind de- 
fensive, and Ed is mighty hard to evade. 




ALLEN 



F. RYAN 



PATTERSON 



E. RYAN 



13 5 




136 



WRESTLING AND BOXING, 1922 

The Tiger wrestling team, under the direction of Coach 
Harvey Donaldson, turned out one champion of the 175-pound 
class. Jack Daywalt was the only C. C. entry in the Rocky 
Mountain conference tournament to get thru the finals. Day- 
wait, at that, weighed in at 160 and had to give away several 
pounds to every man he met. Padgett got into the semifinals 
and only lost in his final bout on a decision. This youngster 
showed up mighty well. He is clever, sturdy and knows all 
the tricks of the game. 

Denver University defeated C. C. in the dual meet, 5-2. 
Padgett and Williamson, in the 125 and 115-pound classes, 
respectively, won the only bouts taken by the Bengals. Later, 
because of a ruling, an extra man was allowed, and Daywalt 
stepped out and proved a winner. D. U. had no boxing team, 
so C. C. qualified seven men. Just before the time of the 
conference meet arrived, however, ineligibilities shot the chances 
of the team, and Moore, a 145-pounder, Maher at 135 pounds, 
and a few others who had been showing well, were not able to 
make the trip. 

Bemis, one of C. C's. best point getters, had to emit early 
in the season because of illness. Carter also became ineligible. 

These setbacks prevented "Shorty" from placing a strong 
team in either boxing or wrestling. He developed several good 
men, only to see them ruled out. 

Wyoming and the Aggies tied for first place in the con- 
ference meet. State was second, and the Tigers, Mines and 
D. U. tied for third place. Providing some of the promising 
men can get eligible next year the outlook in both boxing and 
wrestling is good. 

TENNIS, 1921 

Colorado College won the Rocky Mountain conference 
championship in tennis for the 1921 season. 



The first call for candidates resulted in a large entry list. 
A tournament was held and eliminations were gone thru, the 
result being that the squad narrowed to four men. Ben Sweet, 
Herman Clow, Larry Wolfe, and Ralph Hankins then came 
thru with a championship. 

The championship tourney was held at Denver. Wolfe, 
Clow and Hankins grabbed off their singles matches, the last 
match going to Carpenter of the School of Mines. In the 
doubles, Wolfe and Hankins and Clow and Sweet defeated 
their opponents rather easily. 

These four men are among the best amateur tennis players 
in the state, if not the west. 



GOLF, 1921 

For the first time in the history of Colorado College golf 
took a prominent place on the sport calendar in 1921. The 
Tiger team, consisting of Acting Captain Hubert Clay, Ray 
Purington, Stuart Armit and Les MacTavish, made a strong 
combination in the art of "hunting golfs." 

The team won from Denver University and the Miners in 
dual meets. Another dual meet, this with the University of 
Colorado, went to the State quartet. 

The conference meet was held on the Lakewood course 
in Denver. State took first place, while Colorado College and 
the vSchool of Mines tied for second position. Boulder annexed 
11 points, while the Tigers and Mines bunch got 10 each. It 
was a close meet, where one bad putt prevented a title coming 
here. 

There is a world of material on hand for this season. The 
conference meet is to be held on the Broadmoor course. Mac- 
Tavish and Armit are back. It looks like a Tiger victory this 
time. The meet is scheduled for late in May. The game has 
made a hit in the conference and good matches are expected. 



131 




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141 



FRESHMEN FOOTBALL, 1921 

Under the capable guidance of Coach Harry Holman and 
Assistant Coach M. A. Jencks, the Freshmen Football Team 
went through a very successful season. 

The vearlings rounded into shape rather swiftly and for 
their first game were matched with the St. Regis College team 
of Denver. The game was played the morning of home-coming 
day and the Freshmen won by a score of 7-0. 

The team next tangled with Greeley Teachers College. 
The Freshmen were outweighed but not outplayed and sent 
the upstaters home to the tune of 14-0. As in the St. Regis 
game, the Frosh would work the ball into scoring distance only 
to lose it. Finally with only five minutes to play, MacDougall 
blocked a kick and Dill scooped it up, scoring on the play. 
Greeley protested the touchdown on the grounds that Dill 
had run out of bounds, and threatened to forfeit the game if 
the protest was not allowed. After arguing some time they 
consented to play the rest of the game and the Frosh, thoroughly 
enraged, scored another touchdown in three minutes by straight 
football. The quickness with which the last score was made 
is clearly explained. The field was getting dark and the 
Freshmen had had so much practice playing against the 
Varsity at dusk that they just naturally played the Teachers 
off their feet. 

At the close of the season, Coach Parsons arranged a 
regular game between the second Varsity and the Freshmen. 
On a snow covered field, and with the yells of thousands of 
frenzied spectators ringing in their ears, the Freshmen slid a 
touchdown over the Second Team's goal. 



The following men were awarded numeials: 



Briggs (Capt. 

Cornell 

Zickefoose 

Faken 

Schaede 



Babcock 

Arms 

MacDougall 

Muncy 

Hunter 

McLaughlin 



Delaney 

Hunt 

Matthews 

Hope 

Hamilton 

Hunter 



Govereau 

Tucker (Mgr.) 

Cox 

Taft 

Morel and 





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THE PIKES PEAK NUGGET 

Editor— Keith Chick 
Associate Editor— Carl Brumfield A thletic Editor— Malcolm Graham Manager— M. E. Carter 

Photographer- Perkins Bushnell 

Assistant Editors: 
Roxana Jackson Anna Herzog 

Frances Tucker Lester Busey 

Sophomore Assistant Editor- Paul Sundbury 

Art Editor- Helen Finlay Assistant Art Editor— George Croll 

Assistant Managers: 

Russell Hunter Perry Greiner L. A. Chatham 

PUBLISHED ANNUALLY IN THE MONTH OF MAY 



■ 11 




145 



IL- 



,11 



THE TIGER 



Editor- Eino Leino 



Associate Editor— Keith Chick 



Line Editor- Ira Hicks 



Manager- A. R. C. Warclwell 



Assistant Editors: 
Reith Strachan 
Virginia Newman 
Suoma Leino 
Zella Brown 
Sam McCool 



Danforth Hale 
Frances Tucker 
Lorraine Moody 



Assistant Managers. 
C. Rice 

Wm. Albert 
J. Lawson 



Winifred Moulton Brooks Brice 

Frank Waters Charles Wadell 

Lewis A. Chatham 



A Chapman 
John Duniway 
L. B. Powell 
Bradley Kidder 
Elwood Amos 



PUBLISHED TWICE A WEEK FROM SEPTEMBER TO JUNE 



IF 



m 




141 



STUDENT COMMISSION 



1921-22 has been a busy year for the 
vStudent Commission. Its most marked 
activities have been the plans for a number 
of affairs which have included the whole 
student body in their guest lists. The 
Home-Coming Week, which they planned 
was the most successful in years, bringing 
back over three hundred alumni. The 
first big reception to students and faculty 
was given by the Commission. The All- 
College Picnic and several All-College 
dances were given under its supervision. 
Campus clean-up day was planned by the 



Commission and its results brought much 
favorable comment from the townspeople. 

Don McMillan headed the Commis- 
sion the first semester, and after his resig- 
nation, Doris Haymes, the vice-president, 
took his place for the second semester. 
These officers, as well as Mary Clegg Owen 
the secretary and Ian V. MacKenzie, the 
treasurer, were elected by popular vote, 
in accordance with the changes made in 
the constitution in 1921. 



The following members made up the 
Council: Alice Sweet, Y. W. C. A.; 
Frances Tucker, Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Delia K. Scott, Town Girls' 
Association; Gladys Glendenning, Student 
Government Association; Gertrude Klein, 
Intersociety Council; Charles Ball, Ath- 
letic Board; A. R. C. Wardwell, Tiger; 
Howard Linger, succeeded by Frank 
Briggs, Inter-Fraternity Council; Ira 
Hicks, succeeded by Glenn Scott, Inde- 
pendent Club; Farl Harvey, Sophomore 
Class; Fd Morath, Freshman Class; and 
Mark Skidmore, Faculty. 



President, Don McMillan 



OFFICERS 



Vice-President, Doris Havmes 



Secretary, Mary Clegg Owen 



Treasurer, Ian V. MacKenzie 



Doris Haymes succeeded Don McMillan as president upon his resignation at the end of the first semester. 



148 




149 



MINERVA 



Minerva is the oldest organization on 
the campus having been organized in the 
fall of 1891. In the early days of the 
society, meetings were held in the base- 
ment of Palmer Hall (now Cutler). In a 
few years, however, the girls weie per- 
mitted to use, jointly with Apollonian, 
Society Hall. It was turned over entirely 
to Minerva when Apollonian disbanded 
and has been known since that time as 
Minerva Club House. On the afternoons 
of February fifteenth and sixteenth of this 
year, the active members of the society 



held a housewarming for alumnae and 
freshmen girls. 



In the days before the organization of 
the Dramatic Club, Minerva presented 
several farces each year, and in May 1904 
very successfully produced "The Winter's 
Tale." 

For a number of years Minerva held 
an annual Fair, which has been adopted 
by the Y. W. C. A. and has been trans- 
formed into the Y. W. Circus. It was 
also the custom of Minerva to entertain 

Once a Minervan, Always a Minervan. 



their friends with a spring dance in the 
"Jungle." This has also been taken over 
by the Y. W. C. A. and is now known as 
the Annual May Festival. 

During the thirty years of its existence, 
Minerva has received into fellowship three 
hundred eighty seven members. Alumnae 
associations in Boston, New York City, 
Denver and Colorado Springs are typical 
of the fulfillment of one of Minerva's 
highest aims — sincere and enduring friend- 
ship. 



President, Suoma Leino 
Vice-President, Rowena Hampshire 
Secretary, Nina Shaffer 

President, Mary Clegg Owen 
Vice-President, Frances Tucker 



OFFICERS 
First Semester 
Treasurer, Lutie Marshall 
Factotum, Frances Tucker 

Second Semester 
Secretary, Clara Burghart 
Treasurer, Lutie Marshall 



Custodian, Clara Burghart 

Inter Society Rep., Mary Clegg Owen 



Factotum, Rowena Hampshire 
Custodian, Margarete Morris 



1921 
Genevieve Cox Kathyrn Hood 

Jean Kirby Margarete Morris 

Zella Brown 



MEMBERS 

1922 
Rowena Hampshire Suoma Leino 
Nina Shaffer Lutie Marshall 

Mary Clegg Owen 



1923 
Frances Tucker Clara Burghart 



150 




151 



CONTEMPORARY 



Twenty-two years ago on November 
14, 1899, twenty-one girls met together to 
form a society under the name "Sigma 
Nu," "second to none." The original 
purpose of this society which soon became 
known as "The Contemporary Club," was 
to "cultivate the art of speaking and sus" 
tain an interest in literary work." Their 
colors were the red and white; the flower, 
the cardinal carnation, while the Gothic 
"C" was taken as the emblem. Miss 
Marion Williams, '02, was the first presi- 
dent. 

The first meetings were held in the new 
Perkins Memorial. Later, they met in 
Palmer Hall, until the classes crowded 



them out. They then moved to a little 
wooden building where Cossitt now stands, 
which they shared with Pearson's Dramatic 
Club. About ten years ago, Contemporary 
moved to Wolcott Observatory, where it 
has been ever since. 

Until 1913, there was no eligibility 
council and rivalry for membership was 
very strong. It was so much like a local 
sorority that the authorities of the college 
forced the societies to adopt the present 
system. This has resulted in its being 
necessary for a girl to live up to certain 
qualifications before she can be admitted 
in the middle of her sophomore year. 



In 1917, came the gift of one thousand 
dollars to create a scholarship fund, the 
income of which is to be awarded through 
the Club. The fund is known as the 
Alice Kidder Memorial Fund. 

There are about four hundred fifty 
alumnae, organized in the Contemporary 
Alumnae Association. A bulletin pub- 
lished every two years keeps every member 
in touch with the other alumnae and with 
the active chapter. 

Not for Contemporary alone but for 
Contemporary and Colorado College is the 
toast of the members. 



President, Marion Tittle 
Vice-President, Anna Herzog 



OFFICERS 
First Semester 
Secretary-Treasurer, Ruth Staff 
Factoti, Ruth Hegener, Eleanor Bartlett 

Second Semester 
President, Eleanor Bartlett Secretary-Treasurer, Anna Herzog 

Edna Van Horn Factoti, Ruth Hegener, Marion Tittle 



Inter-Society Rep., Harriett Mason 
Student Commission Rep., Gertrude Klein 



Vice-President 



192: 



Eleanor Bartlett 



MEMBERS 

1923 
Marion Little Anna Herzog Gertrude Klein 

Edna Van Horn Harriett Mason 

Ruth Staff Ruth Hegener 



1924 
Juanita White Bernice Williams 

Lorraine Moody Ruth Little 

Christine Miller Mae Gallavan 

Dorothv Nyhus 



152 



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153 



HYPATIA 



Hypatia, the youngest of the girls' 
societies in Colorado College, was organ- 
ized in the fall of 1903. Much encourage- 
ment was given by Minerva and Contem- 
porary as well as the faculty of the College. 
After the greater part of the Greek alpha- 
bet had been suggested for a name 
"Hypatia" was decided upon by the 
twenty-eight members. Green and white 
were selected for the colors, and the white 
daisy with its golden heart, for the flower. 

In 1905, Hypatia's first annual function 



was held. It was a dinner dance at the 
Antlers Hotel. The 1921 function, held 
early in the spring was at the Broadmoor 
Hotel. 

In their early history, the Hypatians 
gave a supper every fall to Minerva, Con- 
temporary and the new girls of the College. 
This affair has now evolved into an annual 
Autumn Tea given during Home Coming 
Week. This year the Initiation Breakfast 
was served the next morning at the Broad- 
moor Hotel. 



The Hypatians meet every Friday 
afternoon in their clubroom,Ticknor Study, 
to enjoy a program and a social hour. The 
first subject they took up in 1903, was 
"Greek Art." This was followed by a 
study of the art of all other countries. 
Last year "The Opera" was discussed. 
"Contemporary Drama" is the subject 
around which the programs are built this 
year. The purpose of such meetings is 
to enlarge the culture of Hypatia's mem- 
bers and in the fellowship enjoyed to en- 
courage the growth of character. 



President, Serena Mcintosh 
Vice-President, Gladys Glendenning 



President, Faye Lilley 
Vice-President, Adelaide Brown, 
Martha Tucker 



1922 
Adelaide Brown Delsie Holmquist 

Gladys Glendenning Faye Lilley 
Doris Haymes Serena Mcintosh 

Martha Tucker 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

Secretary, Faye Lilley 
Treasurer, Martha Tucker 

Second Semester 

Secretary, Delsie Holmquist 
Treasurer, Serena Mcintosh 

MEMBERS 

1923 
Harriett Bumstead Alice Sweet 

Vera Waeuele 



Inter Society Re p., Doris Haymes 
Factotum, Harriett Bumstead 



Factotum, Vera Waegele, Alice Sweet 



1924 
Gertrude Sherk Clara Vorrietor 

Margaret Carter Evelyn Stannard 

Elizabeth Brown 



154 




155 




TOWN GIRLS ASSOCIATION 



The Controlling Board 



President, Nina Shaffer 

Vice-President, Margaret Thomas 

Secretary-Treasurer, Clara Burghart 

Student Commission Representative, 
Delia Scott 

Tiger Correspondent, Ruth Little 



Seniors, Marion Little, Jessie Morrow. 

Juniors, Esther Norton, Mary Morris. 

Sophomores, Christine Miller, Adelaide 
Easley. 

Freshmen, Margaret Morris, Helen Brown. 



The Town Girls Association of 1921- 
22 boasts of a membership of over one 
hundred, the largest in the history of the 
organization. It corresponds to the Stu- 
dent Government Association in that it 
organizes the Colorado Springs girls, en- 
abling them to know each other better by 
providing a series of informal meetings 
with short programs followed by refresh- 
ments and dancing, aside from the tradi- 
tional dance and breakfast. 

The Town Girls Association plans for 
sponsors from the Senior and Junior classes 
for the new girls in the fall. This year the 
new girls were allowed to choose their 
sponsors and the system worked very well. 

The first Monday in September after 
College opened, the Association held a 
picnic in Monument Park. 

In October the Seniors and Juniors 
entertained the other members with a 
Hallowe'en party in Ticknor study. In 
November the annual costume dance 
took place, bringing out a huge crowd of 
fantastic figures, ranging in color and 
costume from a very black Aunt Jemima 
and vSambo through a great variety of 
gypsies and harem queens to the daintiest 
of ballet dancers. 

The vSophomores entertained with a 
Christmas party on December 14, with a 
short program and dancing. February's 
party honored St. Valentine and March's 
St. Patrick. An April Fool party brought 
the girls together for one last good time 
before the spring vacation and in May the 
annual breakfast took place in South 
Cheyenne Canon. 



156 



SCIENCE CLUB 

The vScience Club was organized in the 
second semester of the year 1920-21, in an 
attempt to reorganize the Chemistry Club 
which was active until the death of Dr. 
Wm. Strieby, head of the Chemistry de- 
partment, who died on October 18, 1920. 
It was the intention of a group of chemistry 
assistants to form a club for themselves. 
The constitution was drawn up and adopt- 
ed by them and officers were elected. They 
were then asked to enlarge the organization 
to take in students who were majoring in 
a science, and voted to take students from 
the departments of biology, chemistry, 
mathematics, physics and psychology. The 
professors and instructors of the depart- 
ments were given honorary membership. 
Before becoming a member a student must 
have six semester hours credit in the de- 
partment in which he is majoring. The 
officers this year are : President, Carl 
Brumfield; vice-president, Fern Pring; 
secretary, Harry Newman; treasurer Ches- 
ter Shaffer; Tiger correspondent, Douglas 
Corley; Dr. Douglas is the faculty advisor. 

The purpose of the club is to promote 
interest in science, to encourage research, 
and to give the members a general knowl- 




edge of all sciences included. Meetings 
are held every second Tuesday evening 
when papers are read by members or when 
speakers are brought from outside the club. 

Although the Club is a new organiza- 
tion it now has about twenty-five membeis. 
For the organization and success of the 
Club much credit is due to the work of 
Dr. F. W. Douglas, Dr. R. J. Gilmore, the 
president and vice-president. 



OFFICERS 
President, Carl Brumfield 
Vice-President, Fern Pring 
Secretary, Harry Newman 
Treasurer, Chester Shaffer 
Tiger Correspondent, Douglas Corley 
Faculty Adviser, Dr. Douglas 



157 




Director, Edwin A. Dietrich 



Violins, 

Marjorie Drake 
Dorothy Allen 
Curtis Haupt 
Ralph Heller 

Viola, Fred English 
Cello, Dorothy Wells 
Bass Viol, Anbor Fuller 
Piano, Charles Bvbee 



Cornets, 

Harold Staff 

Elmer Bell 

Carl Brumfield 
Clarinet, 

Kenneth Coons 

Vernon Scott 

Albert Lyles 
Flute, Danforth Hale 
Trombone, Donald Hale 



C. C. ORCHESTRA 

The Colorado College Orchestra is an 
organization composed of the best musical 
talent on the campus. It holds its meet- 
ings on Wednesday nights at eight o'clock. 
The orchestra has been in existence for 
only a few years, and it is already one of 
the strongest musical organizations in 
College. Edwin A. Dietrich, a graduate 
of the Leipzig Konservatorium, is the 
director. He is one of the foremost 
orchestra conductors of the West, and the 
instructor in violin of the school of music 
of Colorado College. 

The greater part of the activity of the 
orchestra is in the spring but occasionally 
it has been called upon to furnish musical 
programs for the chapel exercises. One of 
the most interesting of these programs, 
from the point of view of entertainment, 
was given last fall. The feature of this 
was the Children's Symphony in which H. 
Howard Brown starred, showing wonderful 
mastery of the tin horn. 

Mr. Dietrich expects to use the orches- 
tra in his annual concert given at the Burns 
theater. No other public performances 
have been arranged as yet but the orches- 
tra is available for any College activity in 
which it is needed. 



158 



LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 

Le Cercle Francais was first establish- 
ed as an organization in Colorado College 
in the fall of 1907. At this time about 
eight students of advanced French found- 
ed the club with the hearty co-operation 
of the Romance Language Department. 
vSince then it has grown and developed, its 
purpose being to promote a love of the 
French language and to help its members 
to a mastery of spoken French. At differ- 
ent times plays have been presented by 
the club. The meetings are bi-monthly, 
the first part of the meeting being devoted 
to a regular program, after which French 
games are played and French songs are 
learned. The club has been very ably 
supported by Professor Skid more, to whose 
enthusiasm and tireless energy the success 
of the year is due. 













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Officers 
President, Jean Kirby Vice-President, Marjorie Collier 

Secretary, Anna Herzog 



159 




w***"* 1 




Meeting Basketball Team on Return from Kansas City. 
Suoma Leino, - President and General Manager 



THE TIGER CLUB 

The Tiger Club, while not an outstand- 
ing organization on the campus, is made up 
of all of the girls in the school, and furnishes 
a means by which girls can manifest their 
enthusiasm in an organized manner at 
varsity athletic games. Since there is a 
tradition prevalent that "young ladies do 
not yell," the "pep" of the girls is shown in 
singing songs, of which C. C. is fortunate 
in having a large number. At the begin- 
ning of each year, the girls elect one of 
their number as a leader to look after 
necessary details of special features in 
which the girls take part, floats in 
parades, etc. The fact that the men of 
the school give such unbounded "pep" 
and forget that the girls are also keenly 
interested in athletics and wish to evidence 
their enthusiasm, makes the functioning 
of the Tiger Club particularly difficult. 
However, when the millenium will have 
arrived and woman has convinced man of 
her legitimate status in life, the men of 
C. C. will be willing to give their sisters a 
hearing. 



160 



THE GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

The Girls' Glee Club was organized in 
October, 1898. The first concert, in 1901, 
was held in the Congregational Church, 
with great success. Although during this 
time everything ran smoothly and the 
Club grew in importance and worth, it was 
found expedient to disorganize for a few 
years until sufficient resources could be 
amassed with which to stabilize the Club, 
purchase equipment, and stimulate interest. 
In 1911, therefor, under Mrs. Taliaferro, 
the organization was put on a sound basis. 

The Executive Board of the Club, in 
1918, offered the place of Conductor to 
Mrs. John Speed Tucker. This has been 
Mrs. Tucker's fourth year of responsibility 
and each annual report has shown a 
marked increase in the ability, strength and 
worth of the Club. 

Each year the work has been put on a 
little higher level, for in 1919 an Operetta, 
"The Lost Necklace," was given with 
entire satisfaction; last year Tennyson's 
immortal "Lady of Shalot," with a pecul- 
iarly appropriate and beautiful musical 
setting was presented to an enthusiastic 
audience; and this year an Indian Operetta 
"Se-a-wa-na," was offered to a capacity 
house. That many believe this last to 
have been the most successful of all, and 
that a great and abiding interest in the 
Club is being displayed by Freshmen and 
new girls, speaks well for the future of the 
association which is coming more and 
more into prominence as one of the larger 
college organizations. 




Officers 

President, Lorena Berger 
Vice-President, Frances Tucker 
Secretary, Thelma Blaine 
Treasurer, Martha Tucker 
Librarian, Mildred Finlay 
Director, Mrs. John Speed Tucker 

The Orchestra has the following personnel : 
Violins: Mrs. J. H. C. Smith, Mr. Ralph 
Heller, Dorothy Allen, Marjorie Drake, 
Marian Lloyd, Gladys Scott. 
Cellos: Lucy Lloyd, Dorothy Wells. 
Saxophone: Sybil Jellison. 
Pianist: Tuanita White. 



vStage Manager Zella Brown 

Costumes Clara Vorrietor 

Property Harriett Bumstead 

Advertising Margaret Morris 

The officers of the Glee Club are : 

Director Mrs. John Speed Tucker 

President Lorena Berger 

Vice-President Frances Tucker 

Secretary Thelma Blaine 

Treasurer Martha Tucker 

Librarian Tuanita White 



161 




mJM: 





OFFICERS 

First Semester 
President, Reith Strachan 

V ice-President, v Suoma Leino 
Secretary, Keith Chick 

Treasurer, Joseph Bern 
Second Semester 
President, Keith Chick 

Vice-President, Suoma Leino 
Secretary, Mary Clegg Owen 
Treasurer, Joseph J. Dern 



Eino Leino 
Albert Lyles 
vSerena Mcintosh 
Robert S. Mcllvaine 
William Keith Chick 



Members 

Suoma Leino 
Ben Wendelken 
Mary Clegg Owen 
Reith Strachan 
Joseph J. Dern 



Lilla Munger 



K. U. K. 

K. U. K. is an organization for the 
discussion of Current Events and was 
founded January 27, 1919. It came into 
existence largely thru the efforts of Prof. 
Dice and Prof. Ellingwood. Robert 
Sevitz, a member of the class of '20 was 
the first president. The club has grad- 
ually drifted into the discussion of Inter- 
national relations, and is now affiliated 
with the International Relation Society. 
This society endowed by the Carnegie 
estate is sending out men to speak to 
groups that are discussing Foreign re- 
lations. The society with these men hopes 
to create a better understanding by dis- 
simulating authentic first hand informa- 
tion. Dr. Muirhead, the Scotchman, from 
the University of Birmingham, Dr. Zim- 
merman from Oxford and Dr. Joshi, the 
Hindu, from the University of Bombay, 
were all brought here thru this society. 



162 



A.-B. CLUB 

The A.-B. Club was organized this fall 
for the purpose of promoting the interests 
of the business students in business affairs. 
The Club is composed of students taking 
at least two business courses or two 
courses applying on a business major. 
They also must maintain a grade of "B" 
or better in these courses. The purpose 
of the Club is twofold; first to promote an 
interest in business courses and, second, to 
create a much needed open forum for 
discussions of general interest to students. 
Although this is the Club's first year, it 
is sincerely hoped that it may continue to 
be a success and also a help to the students 




President, Frank Mahan 

Treasurer, Jack Dern 



Vice-President, Margaret Carter 
Secretary, Lucile Lilyard 



163 




( )FFICERS 
President, Ruth Williamson V ice-President, Margaret Ellis 

Secretary, Elizabeth Knox 
Treasurer, Catherine Benshing 



FORTNIGHTLY SKETCH CLUB 

The Fortnightly Sketch Club was 
organized in 1918 by members of the 
Academy of Fine Arts, and had for its 
purpose the promotion of art interests 
among the students of the Academy and 
the College. 

The Club started with twelve charter 
members. The first president was the 
late Marjorie Dudley, the vice-president, 
Jessie Foster. During 1919, under the 
presidency of Helen Cogswell, the club 
became a student organization with a 
membership of twenty eight. The activ- 
ities of this year consisted of a dance at 
San Luis School, and a sale of student's 
work was held later. Half the proceeds 
were donated to the Women's Educational 
Society. In the spring the club held a 
"Gipsy Tea" — an attractive social affair. 

The following year Maude Allen was 
elected president and the social event of 
the year was an entertainment at Cogs- 
well Theater, consisting of tableaux, living 
pictures and solo dances, followed by a 
tea at Bemis Hall. 

The president this year is Daisy Mc- 
Entire and the activities of the club have 
consisted of a picnic at Prospect Lake and 
a sale of paper Tiger mascots. Half of 
the proceeds of this sale were donated to 
the Athletic Fund. 

Meetings are held every two weeks at 
the Academy of Fine Arts, Perkins Hall. 



164 



EUTERPE 

Euterpe was preceeded by the Pierian 
Society founded by Dean Hale in 1908. 
That society ran a rather brief course : a 
very small but aggressive group conceived 
the idea of making a secret society out of 
it. The Dean explained that C. C. 
policy did not approve the Sororitv idea. 
Later he was obliged to explain further 
that the club would have to chose between 
the Greek letter obsession and demise. 
Demise! 

Two years later, at about the time he 
organized the Girl's Glee Club, Dean Hale 
founded Euterpe, with its motto "Good 
Work and Lend a Hand" (Suggested by 
Mr. Thornton), and a constitution which 
insured among other things a democratic 
organization and policy. 

Any member of the School of Music is 
eligible, and its administration is in the 
hands of the active membership. It has 
also an associate and honorary member- 
ship. Euterpe meets fortnightly in private 
homes. The programs are musical, some- 
times with papers, sometimes with addres- 
ses from visitors. It so fulfills the purpose 
expressed in its preamble, to promote the 
social life and the interests of the School, 
and the cause of music. 




Officers 

President, Marjorie Drake Vice-President, Esther Norton 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. J. Friedman 



Membership 



Winona Blann 
Mrs. H. H. Brown 
Ida Burleigh 
Kenneth Coons 
Mrs. J. Friedman 



Jessie Spicer 



H. Howard Brown 
Ruth Brown 
Thelma Burchlield 
Marjorie Drake 
Mary Frye 



B. Griswold E- D. Hale 

Mrs. E. D. Hale Ralph Heller 

Mrs. E. E. Jackson Ruth Johnson 
Christine Miller Esther Norton 

Mrs. Reuthinger Hazel Round 

Helen Sterling: 



165 




Reader — Elwood Amos. 
Director — Dean Hale. 



Membership 

President — Carl Brumfield 

Manager — Ralph Emery. 
Violin Soloist — Ralph Heller. 
Traps — Liston Sewell, George Rippey. 

First Tenors — Harry Taylor, Marvin Reinking, Edmund Maher, Kenneth Coons. 
vSecond Tenors — Gibson Winans, Danforth Hale, Donald Hale. 
Baritone — Wm. Hansen, Ralph Emery, Dwight Strothers, Theo. Winans, Russel 

Mann. 
Second Bass — Frank Mahan, George Thatcher, Carl Brumfield. 

Jazz Orchestra 
Piano — Eugene Johnson. Saxophones — Melvin Haymes, Paul Spencer. 

Traps — Olin Capps. Violin — Edmund Maher. 

Banjo — R. Emery. 



THE MENS" GLEE CLUB 

In the Collegian, the forerunner of the 
Tiger, under the date of November 20, 
1896, mention is made of a rumor that a 
Glee Club is to be formed. It was not 
until a year later, however, that sixteen 
students under the leadership of one of 
their number, Richard Damson, organized 
the Colorado College Glee Club. 

During the quarter of a century of its 
existence the Club has been to the four 
corners of the State, and as far away as 
Ogden, Utah, Cheyenne, Wyoming and 
down into New Mexico. It has met with 
undeniable success wherever it has gone. 
It has sung for the G. A. R., for the 
Chamber of Commerce, in municipal 
orchestra concerts in Denver and Colo- 
rado Springs, and lately for the Rotary and 
Kiwanis Clubs. After General W. J. 
Palmer met with the accident that re- 
stricted his outside activities, it was the 
annual custom of the Glee Club to sing to 
him in the splendid music room of Glen 
Eyrie. 

President Slocum used to say that the 
Glee Club was the best advertising 
medium the College had. The Club has 
carried the name of Colorado College into 
many high schools and into out-of-the-way 
places where athletic teams cannot go. 



166 



COLORADO COLLEGE BAND 

The first Colorado College band was 
organized in 1915 with a total of nineteen 
members. Since that year, there have 
been bands of more or less merit organized 
to furnish music at the games. All service 
in the band has been purely voluntary, no 
official recognition being given. In the 
fall of 1919, the band was given a trip to 
Boulder, when the president, Roy Gleason, 
borrowed the necessary funds. The money 
was later repaid from the proceeds of an 
All College dance. 

In 1920-21, Mr. Fink was the leader 
but it became so difficult to hold practices 
due to lack of attendance of the members 
that they were discontinued. Since then, 
the members have come out to games and 
parades and played as best they could at 
whatever piece of music was set before 
them. During the last two years, the 
band has been given the privilege of play- 
ing at the games, the admission of the 
members being paid when they obtained 
their student passes. 

This year, only a few practices have 
been held, but the band has played at all 
the football games and in every parade 
but one. The showing made this year was 
rather poor on account of many of the 
members not turning out for practice, but 
the band is not discouraged and hopes to 
be a real credit to Colorado College next 
year. 




Membership 

Conductor — Carl Brumfield. Manager — Harry Taylor. 

Assistant Conductor — Harold Staff. Treasurer — Gibson Winans. 

Cornets — Carl Brumfield, Harold Staff, Waldron Fair, Glen McLaughlin. 
Saxophones — Jeff Wardwell, Marvin Reinking, Allan Marshall. 
Altos — Theodore Winans, Gibson Winans, Russell Mann. 
Trombones — William Thompson, Dan Hale. 

Clarinets — Albert Lyles, Vernon Scott, Glenn Scott, Kenneth Coons, Warren Leisy. 
Drums — Liston Sewell, Perkins Bushnell. 
Bass — Harvey Towles 
Baritone — Harry Taylor. 
Piccolo — Ralph Heller. 



16T 




OFFICERS 

President, Clyde II. Babcock Vice-President, Margaret Sargent 

Secretary, Alexander Taft 
Treasurer, Alonzo Cornell 

The delegate to the National Student Council at Lincoln was George Frank. 



THE PHILIP WASHBURN 
EPISCOPAL CLUB 

The Episcopal club of Colorado Col- 
lege was organized in St. Stephens parish 
in October of 1921. 

After sending a delegate to the National 
Student Council of the Episcopal Church 
for the province of the Northwest, held at 
Lincoln, Nebraska, the club voted to be- 
come affiliated with the national organi- 
zation and to accept the minimum pro- 
grams prescribed by that organization. 

The meetings of the club are semi- 
monthly, on the alternate Sunday even- 
ings beginning with the first week in the 
college year. 

The object of the club is: to pro- 
mote a sense of responsibility among the 
Episcopal men and women of the college 
for the increase in church attendance and 
an improvement of church loyalty, to bring 
into church relations such students as have 
no church home in the city, and to extend 
to men and women away from home the 
acquaintance and protection of the church 
community. 

The club has been entertained at the 
homes of several of the prominent 
Episcopalians of this city. Several social 
affairs given by the club itself has added 
to the enjoyment and interest of the more 
serious side of the work. The club has 
been greatly hindered with matters of 
organization but in the future expects to 
take an important part in the activities 
of the college. 



168 



THE WOMEN'S ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



The Women's Athletic Association of 
Colorado College was organized in the 
spring of 1915, with the object of promot- 
ing interest in sports for women by putting 
their athletics on a competitive basis. 

All women students upon payment of 
their athletic fee to the college, become 
members of the association. They elect 
the members of the Executive Board which 
is composed of the regular officers of the 
association together with the 'Head' of 
each of the sports. 

There are two insignia given for com- 
petitive contests — the class numerals and 
the emblem of the Women's Athletic 
Association, which is a double C. The 
numerals are awarded to the winners of 
the fall tennis tournament, of the swim- 
ming contest and to those students making 
high scores in the indoor gymnastic meet 
held in the early spring before outdoor 
sports begin. The emblem is awarded at 
the end of the spring term on an individual 
basis with a point system as the founda- 
tion. Seventy women have earned this 
emblem up to the present time. A silver 
cup trophy has often been presented to the 
winner of the spring tennis tournament. 

The Women's Athletic Association can 
mean little or much, according to the 
interest shown by the women students in 
their own athletics and sports. 




OFFICERS 



President, Eleanor E. Bartlett 
Vice-President, Harriett Bumstead 
Secretary-Treasurer, Gertrude Sherk 
Student Comm. Rep., Trances Tucker 
Hocky, Stena Dearborn 



Baseball, Mary Morris 
Track, Mae E- Gallavan 
Swimming, Mildred Rule 
Hiking, Florence Tawson 
Tennis, Ruth Little 



169 




OFFICERS 



Director, Mrs. Briscoe 

President, Josephine Miller 

Vice-President, Marjorie Drake 
Secretary, Elizabeth Brown 



Treasurer, Clara Vorrietor 
Librarian, Juanita White 

Asst. Librarian, Mildred Earnest 



MEMBERS 



Mandolins: 

Clara Vorrietor Josephine Miller 
Florence Wilson Dorothy Van Meter 
Dorothy Brodhead Lillian Sullivan 
Elizabeth Brown Lois McMullen 
Mae Gallavan Jessie Spicer 



Guitars: Elizabeth Williamson 

Violin: Marjorie Drake, ThelmaBurchfield 

Saxophone: Sibyl Jellison 

Piano: 

Juanita White Christine Miller, Asst. 



MANDOLIN CLUB 

The Mandolin Club was organized in 
the fall of 1918. That winter it appeared 
with the Glee Club in their concert giving 
a gypsy scene. The total membership was 
then nine with Miss Anne Elstun as leader. 
Since then the number of members, qual- 
ity of musicians, and variety of instru- 
ments has steadily grown. It has been the 
annual custom to give an afternoon dance 
to raise funds for expenses. Playing for 
several of the 'Girls' augments this. Usual- 
ly the Mandolin Club assisted the Glee 
Club with their concerts. This year, how- 
ever, plans are under way for a unique 
concert of their own. The outcome of this 
is yet to be seen. 

For this, music has been gathered from 
all parts of the world, eight nations being 
represented. These are: Ireland, France 
vSpain, Italy, China, Hawaii, Denmark and 
Mexico. In the concert-to-be, these na- 
tions will be represented by songs, dances, 
solos, orchestra numbers and mandolin 
numbers. Great interest is being aroused 
in this subject, and the chances for success 
are on the increase. 

The club is very generous with its 
talent, playing gratuitously for many 
things in school and in town. The girls 

work hard Their meetings, which 

occur each week, are devoted to practice. 
A chosen member from the Mandolin Club 
forms the music committee for the Dra- 
matic Club. 



no 



Y. W. C. A. 

In the year 1888, Miss Hloise Wickard, 
an instructor in English at Colorado Col- 
lege, organized a Young Women's Christ- 
ian Association for the girls of the College. 
There were twenty members. Meetings 
were held in Society Hall (a part of Cutler) 
until it became the college library; then in 
the Museum. When Montgomery Hall 
was erected its meetings were held there 
until the erection of Ticknor Hall in 1899. 
Ticknor became the meeting place for a 
number of years, giving way to Bemis Hall, 
where the meetings are now held. 

Not until 1892 was the Association 
firmly established. At this time Miss 
Elizabeth Wilson, a traveling secretary of 
the International Y. W. C. A. visited the 
college and through her, the college Y. W. 
C. A. joined the International Association. 

Until a few years ago any girl in college 
who was a member of an Evangelical 
Church might become an active member. 
Those who were not members of such 
churches could be only associate members. 
Now the basis of membership is changed. 
A personal pledge must be taken by every 
girl who desires to become a member of 
the Y. W. C. A. She must state "It is 
my purpose to live as a true follower of 
the Lord Jesus Christ." 




The Association's executive board is 
composed of the Cabinet, which is made 
up of the president and the chairmen of 
the committees. The work of the Y. W. 
C. A. is carried on by these committees. 

The activities of the Y. W. C. A. which 
are social in character, start with a recep- 
tion at the first of the year for the new 
girls of the college. 

The aim of the Association is: "A 
Whole Christianity for the Whole indi- 
vidual, for the Whole World." 



Rep. 



Otficers 

President, Adelaide Brown 

Vice-President, Ruth Staff 

Secretary, Sadie Kier 

Treasurer, Mary Hicks 

to Student Commission, Alice Sweet 



Cabinet 



Clara Burghart 
Helen Armstrong 
Norma Bright 
Ora Gjerde 
Elizabeth Brown 



Marie Bollinger 
Olive Haun 
Marjorie Collier 
Vera Waegele 
Evelyn Stannard 



m 




OFFICERS 
First Semester 

President Edna Van Horn 

Vice-President Gertrude Klein 

Secretary-Treasurer Helen Finlay 

Critic Miss Hutsinpillar 

Second Semester 

President Florence Lawson 

Vice-President Lois Rose 

Secretary-Treasurer Olive Haun 

Critic Miss Hutsinpillar 

Sub-Critic Delia Scott 

Tiger Correspondent Edna Theobold 

Factotum Gertrude Klein 



MEMBERSHII 

1932 

Olive Haun Mary Kemp 

1923 

Clara Burghart 
Elsie Essex 
Gertrude Klein 
Mabel Sadler 



Delia Scott 



Erma Adams 
Marie Farmer 



Thelma Burchfield 
Helen Finlay 
Florence Lawson 
Edna Van Horn 

1924 

Marjorie Collier 
Mildred Finlay 



AnnaJaneHitchcock Lorene Reynolds 
Lois Rose Edna Theobold 

HONORARY 

Miss Pbinney Miss Bramhall 

Miss Hutsinpillar Miss Campbell 



ATHENIAN SOCIETY 

Athenian is one of the new campus 
organizations, being founded in 1919, 
largely through the effort of Miss Hutsin- 
pillar, of the English Department. The 
purpose of the society is to encourage active 
participation in debating among the wom- 
men students of Colorado College. It is 
hoped that in time such activity will lead 
to the establishing of a public speaking 
department in the college. 

The first regular meeting of the 
Athenian Society was held on March 8, 
1920. Katherine Wilson was elected as 
the first president. 

Membership is open to all Senior, 
Junior and Sophomore women. Each 
applicant for membership is required to 
give a five minute argument on either side 
of a epiestion chosen by the society as the 
subject for "try out". By vote of the 
society, faculty members, who show an 
interest in the work of Athenian may be- 
come honorary members. 

Miss Delia Scott, a charter member 
of Athenian, has the honor of being the 
first woman of Colorado College to take 
in an inter-collegiate debate. She was a 
member of the team that defeated the 
University of New Mexico debating team 
in 1920. 

The program for this year has consisted 
largely of discussions and debates on 
questions of foreign relations. Interest- 
ing and instructive debates have resulted 
from the discussion of such questions as 
disarmament, the foreign policy of Japan, 
and extra territoriality in China. 



172 



BIOLOGICAL PERIPATETICS 

History repeats itself. Philosophers 
of old discoursed voluminously on subjects 
of nature while perambulating leisurely 
under the clear blue skies of ancient 
Greece. Emulating their noble example, 
the biologists of Colorado College have 
chosen to wander afield and 'list to Na- 
ture's teaching'. At stated and unstated 
intervals this knowledge seeking band 
abandon the massive halls of learning and 
mingle with things as they are in the 
places where thev are. 

The Peripatetics were organized dur- 
ing the grasshopper season of 1921. Mem- 
bership is limited to those who by pros- 
pect and practice, labor diligently in quest 
of Nature's hidden truths. Each conclave 
is an expedition to some secluded recess 
where peaceful contemplation of Nature 
may be consumated without the intrusion 
of the uninitiated. 

The following are the charter members: 
Ralph J. Gilmore, Ruth A. Gilmore, Harry 

E. Fling, Florence M. Brumback, Thelma 

F. Kaufman, Evelyn Arkwright, Olive E. 
Haun, Elizabeth Knox, Dorothy Mat- 
thews, Josephine H. Miller, Eunice Mc- 
Campbell, Ora J. Gjerde, Allison G. James, 
'Bill' Gilmore, Helen Armstrong, Harriet 
L. Mason, Russell P. Hunter, 'Jeff' Davis, 
Verna M. Hixson, Jessie E. Morrow, 
Brvan W. Hixson, and 'Bob' Gilmore. 




Officers 

Cephalic Enzyme, William C. Sennings 
Bursa, Margaret C. Thomas 
Soothsayer, Lorraine Moodv 



Ergograpli, Thelma E- Bradley 
Enterokinase, Kenneth L- Gordon 
Oracle, Glenora M. Oliver 



Praetorian Guard, Ruth M. Hegener 



173 




Officers and Committee Chairmen 

President, Harry F. Taylor Papetown Service, J. Elwood Amos 

Vice-President, Albert C. Lyles Papetown Service, Prof. A. P. R. Drucker 

Secretary-Treasurer, Harold V. Dusk Advisor, Prof. C. C. Mierow 

Student Friendship, Jack Dern 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
LEAGUE 

From the beginning of Colora'do Col- 
lege as an institution of higher learning to 
the time of the World War, the Young 
Men's Christian Association had a very 
important place in the life of the college. 
The work of the Y, as well as that of many 
other organizations, was interrupted by 
the war and when things got back to 
normal again it was thought best to organ- 
ize an independent organization, the name 
of which should be the Men's Christian 
Peague of Colorado College. Such an 
organization was formed in October, 1920, 
with about seventy-five men signing the 
constitution. 

During this year the organization has 
not held regular meetings but has tried 
especially to direct the religious life through 
the alreadv existing agencies. Students 
have been urged to become interested in 
the churches of the city. The organiza- 
tion has co-operated with Prof. Drucker 
in his social service work at Papetown. A 
special drive was put on for the Student 
Friendship Fund in December and about 
one hundred dollars was raised. 



174 



HAGERMAN HALL 
ASSOCIATION 

The growth of Colorado College has 
been due to the generosity of thousands 
of men and women. In 1888 when Dr. 
Sloeum accepted the presidency of Colo- 
rado College, a great problem confronted 
him. There was no place on the campus 
in which the men of the college might 
reside. Thev were forced to live in private 
houses throughout the city and with the 
increase in number this was becoming 
more and more difficult. 

President Sloeum immediately started 
to raise money to erect a building to fill 
this need. He soon interested Mr. J. J. 
Hagerman, one of the public-spirited men 
of the city in his undertaking. It was 
largely through the financial assistance of 
Mr. Hagerman that in 1889 Hagerman 
Hall was constructed. 

This building had rooms to accommo- 
date some fifty or sixty men. The basement 
was turned into a gymnasium and dining 
room, and for many years 'Hag' was the 
center of the college. It was here that 
Coach Richard and later Coach Rothgeb 
turned out teams which added to the 
glory of Colorado College. The athletic 
function has been taken over bA' Cossitt 




Memorial Hall. However, Hagerman Hall 
still is used as a men's dormitory and 
Hagerman Hall Association is the name 
which has been applied to the organization 
of the men of Hagerman Hall. This 
organization aims to promote college 
spirit and friendship among all those with 
whom it comes into contact. 



Officers and Members 

President, Ernest Sheppard 
Vice-President, Glen G. Seott 
Secretary, J. P. Bushnell 
Treasurer, Paul S. Logan 



Harold F. Allen 
Y. C. Chen 
Chiu-Ming Lin 
Robert S. Mcllvaine 
Paul W. Nesbit 
William Wyatt 
W. D. Copeland 



Pablo Almiral 
Ralph Heller 
Donald M. McCor- 

mick 
H. W. Milner 
Henry Weldon 
E. Mahan 



115 




Members of Executive Board 

President, Delsie Holmquist Bemis House President, Merle Love 

Vice-President, Gladys Glendenning McGregor House President, Helen Wells 
Secretary, Mildred Finlay Montgomery House Pres., Edna Van Horn 

Treasurer, Edna Van Horn Ticknor House President, Alice Sweet 

Junior Representative, Lilla Munger 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 

The young women in residence at Colo- 
rado College desire to assume individual 
and community responsibility for the con- 
duct of the young women in their college 
life. Accordingly some years ago, the 
President and Faculty of Colorado College 
authorized the Student Government As- 
sociation to exercise the power that was 
committed to it, with the most careful 
regard, both for liberty and order and for 
the maintenance of the established policv 
of the College in regard to the best con- 
ditions for scholarly work and a social and 
religious life for the young women. This 
policy has been framed with the basal idea 
of maximum liberty and minimum re- 
straint ; of the utmost freedom of individual 
action possible in community life where the 
highest mental and moral development, 
the habitual exercise of established social 
usages and sane religious thinking are the 
ends sought. 

The members of the Student Govern- 
ment Board are chosen by the young wo- 
men in the halls. 

The aim of the Student Government 
Association is to support the authorities of 
the College and to co-operate with them 
in maintaining a high standard of life and 
scholarship. Its purpose is to promote 
the growth in the students of character, 
and power, and loyalty to the best inter- 
ests of the College. 



176 



THE COLORADO COLLEGE 
CLASSICAL CLUB 

Linguae Mortuae, Sodalitas Vivax! 

The Colorado College Classical Club 
is an organization of present and former 
students of Greek and Latin in Colorado 
College whose purpose is to stimulate 
interest in the Greek and Latin language 
and literatures and to promote a wider 
knowledge of the general field of classics. 

Meetings are held once every two 
weeks at which programs are presented by 
members of the society. The executive 
committee, which exercises general con- 
trol over the affairs of the club, consists of 
the officers, the faculty of the Classical 
Department, and one member at large, 
elected by the club. 

The plans of the Classical Club for the 
current year include the presentation of a 
Latin play at some time during the second 
semester. 

The charter members of the Classical 
Club are: Dorothy Carnine, Alexander 
Chapman, Margarete Coleman, Marie 
Colman, Marjorie Collier, Evangeline 
Dascomb, John Duniway, Mildred Ear- 
nest, Edith Farnsworth, Agnes Flanagan, 
Eada Gilberg, Ora Jean Gjerde, Florence 
Green, May Green, L. M. Hardee, Joan 




Heckenlively, Mary Hicks, Anna Jane 
Hitchcock, Helen Jenner, Evangeline Jo- 
der, Irene Johnson, Sadie Kier, Martha 
Kirkpatrick, Mary Leonard, Marion Little 
Muriel MacGregor, Ada McMahan, James 
McMurtry, Charles Mierow, Christine 
Miller, Sarah Mints, Harry Newman, 
Marjorie O'Brien, Dorothy Printup, Luella 
Pyle, Dorothae Roedel, Margaret Sargent, 
Helene Sheehan, Lucille Smith, Margaret 
vSmith, Mrs. Smithies, Lillian Sullivan, 
Elizabeth Trotter, Bonnie Walker, Ruth 
Watt, J. L. Weaver, Jr., Nina Whisler. 



Officers 

President, Lillian E- Sullivan 
Vice-President, John C. Duniway 
Secretary, Joan Heckenlively 
Treasurer, Anna Jane Hitchcock 

Member-at-large of Executive Committee, 
Evangeline Dascomb. 



177 







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Thr Choir Invisible 

Sweet Lady Miss Phinnev 

Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young 

Charms Miss Merrill 

You're Always the Same Norma Bright 

I've Got the Joys Adelaide Brown 

Gone But Not Forgotten Francelia Eldridge 

Red Head, Red Head Lois Gauld 

Rosy Cheeks Gladys Glendenning 

When He Comes Back Rowena Hampshire 

Smilin' Thru Delsie Holmquist 

The World Can't Go Round Without YouDorothy Kinnev 

O, Hush Thee Elizabeth Knox 

Mon Homme Suoma Leino 

Are You In Love ? Merle Love 

Charley Is My Darling Josephine Miller 



THE DAIS 

The Ancient Order of the Dais was 
founded in the fall of 1908. The first 
officers of this organization included the 
Master, Summoner, Clerk, Franklin, 
Almoner, Baillie and Jester. The roll 
contained the remaining members. 

In 1910 the name Headmaster was 
used, and in 1911 Headmaster was changed 
to High Mogul, the other officers being 
the same. Names such as "The Lord 
High Provider of Cake," and "The Lord 
High Inspector of Movies," were added 
to the above mentioned officers during 
1916-17. The 1918 Dais members called 
themselves "The C. C. Highlanders," and 
had names suited to this title. In 1920 
the Dais elected a president and treasurer, 
and used as their title, "It Pays to Adver- 
tise." Each member was designated by 
a common advertising slogan, as "Say it 
with Flowers." The 1921 Dais was known 
as "The Reader's Guide," and each mem- 
ber was named after a current magazine. 

The 1922 Dais elected a president and 
treasurer. Three new members, Adelaide 
Brown, Dorothy Kinney and Miss Mer- 
rill, were initiated the first of this year. 

The Dais members sit at a long 
table in the front of Bemis Dining Room. 
This table is placed on a platform, which 
is raised a step from the rest of the room, 
hence the name Dais. The Dais color is 
bronze and its symbol is the oak. The 
purpose of this organization is purely 
social. Officers 

President, Norma Bright 
Treasurer, Elizabeth Knox 



178 



LA SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA 

The Spanish Club was organized in 
1918 under the name of "La Sociedad 
Espanola," by Mrs. Florence Bartlett, 
with herself as president, Mr. Fraker as 
vice-president, and Marjorie Davis as 
secretary-treasurer. This organization met 
every other Thursday night, welcom- 
ing to its circles all those interested in 
Spanish. At each meeting Spanish games 
were played, Spanish songs sung to the 
accompaniment of guitars, and Spanish 
anecdotes were told. Their big event of 
the year was an open house at which a 
playlet was presented with the following 
cast, Josephine Miller, the Senorita; Mr. 
Sabin, the Senor; Irena Hamilton, the 
maid and Mr. Fraker, the papa. 

In 1920-21 Paul McConnell was presi- 
dent, Martha Howbert vice-president, 
Leta Gale, secretary, Josephine Miller 
treasurer. The society was especially 
fortunate that year in having several 
members who had travelled through South 
America, Mexico and other Spanish- 
speaking countries. During the year these 
members gave many interesting talks on 
their experiences among the Spanish 
peoples. Mr. Skidrnore entertained the 
club at his home once during the year. 

The purposes of the Spanish Club are 
to afford the members an opportunity of 
conversing in Spanish, and to acquaint 
them with the literature, art and music 
and customs of the Spanish peoples. 




OFFICERS FOR 1921-22 

President, Robert Mcllvaine Vice-President, Leta Gale 

Secretary-Treasurer, George Frank. 

MEMBERS 

Robert Mcllvaine Martha Tucker Dorothy Graves Pablo Almirall 

Leta Gale Lavetta Tevebaugh Harleyn West Mr. Skidrnore 

George Frank Hildred Taylor Florence Green Mr. Latimer 



179 




OFFICERS 



President, Rowena K. Hampshire 

Vice-President, Harriet Bumstead 



Secretary, Alice Sweet 

Treasurer, Anna Herzog 



HEADS OF COMMITTEES 

Costume, Gladys Glendenning Lighting, Mildred Finlay 

Property, Lois Gauld Make-Up, Serena Mcintosh 

Music, Josephine Miller 

DRAMATIC COMMITTEE 



Svioma Leino 



Chairman, Faye Lilley 
Francis Tucker Gertrude Klein 



Gertrude Sherk 



THE GIRLS' DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Girls' Dramatic Club of Colorado 
College was organized in 1907. Miss 
Ruth Aitken was its first president. Little 
was done the first year except to lay the 
foundation, but the second year found a 
good start, made under Miss Carrie Davis, 
the second president. 

Added impetus was given in 1909 when 
the Club was reorganized through the 
efforts of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. Two very interesting farces by 
Howell, "The Sleeping Car" and "The 
Mouse Trap" were given that year. 

From that time forward there has been 
a steady growth in the Club and a steady 
increasing activity. The policy has al- 
ways been to give as many girls as possi- 
ble opportunity to participate in the 
affairs of the organization. All girls, 
whether they possess dramatic talent or 
not, are permitted to become members 
upon payment of dues. This system does 
away with the necessity for "trying out," 
and the danger of partiality in judging. 

The function play has come to be one 
of the customs of the club. All members 
of the club are permitted to invite a guest 
to this play. With the exception of 
"Eager Heart," the Christmas play, to 
which members of the faculty and the 
senior men are invited, this is the only 
performance which non-members may 
attend. The club gives a one-act play 
each month for members only. All plavs 
are coached by students. 



180 



THE PEARSONS DRAMATIC 
CLUB 

The Pearsons Literary Society was 
organized in the fall of 1900 and rapidly 
became one of the leading organizations 
on the campus. The outstanding features 
of the society were first its annual function, 
quite the big social event of the year, and 
second the regularity with which it won 
its debates with the rival society, the 
Apollonians. The motto was "Unity- 
Push." 

In its original inception the society was 
purely a literary club, but gradually be- 
came a more social and progressive organ- 
ization. In a few years a minstrel was 
attempted with so much success that it 
became a yearly custom. This custom 
was kept up until 1917, when the war took 
most of its members and the society was 
disbanded. 

Under the capable hands of Prof. 
Motten, the club was reorganized in 1920 
and took the name of Pearsons Dramatic 
Club. This same year the College ob- 
tained a chapter of Theta Alpha Phi, the 
national dramatic fraternity, and the 
officers were the same as for the club. 







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The following year the organizations 
separated and Pearsons became as it is 
now, a training field for the national fra- 
ternity. 

Pearsons has given several plays this 
year and will continue to do so for some 
time. The membership is not large and 
is maintained by tryouts which are held 
twice each year at the beginning of the 
semesters. 



Officers 
First Semester: 

President, A. R. C. Wardwell 
Vice-President, B. P. Kidder 
Secretary-Treasurer, Russell Hunter 

Second Semester: 

President, B. P. Kidder 
Vice-President, ]. E. Amos 
Secretary-Treasurer, Russell W. Hunter 



181 




MEMBERS 



Donald McMillan 
Earl Harvev 
Edward Patterson 
Kenneth Sewell 
Stanley Delaney 
Howard Linger 
Malcolm MacDougall 



Campbell Rice 
Leo Downer 
William Hanson 
Harry Chapman 
Frank Mahan 
Francis Thomas 
Lesley Moreland 



Frank Briggs 
Myron Carter 
Perry Greiner 
Hayes Briggs 
Francis MacDougall 
Malcolm Graham 
Charley Ball 



Donald Hunt 
Ian MacKenzie 
Cecil Mcintosh 
Fritz English 
George Arms 
Albert Lyles 



5 5 5 3 3 3 > 3 5 5 } 5 



THE QUESTION CLUB 

What is the Question Club? ? ? ? 

????????????? 

When was the Question Club founded? 

????????????? 

What is the purpose of the Question 
Club 2 ????.??????? 

????????????? 

When and where does the Question 
Club meet? ? 5 ?????? ? 
????????????? 

Who is the president of the Question 
Club? ??????????? 

????????????? 

What does the Question Club do? ? ? 

????????????? 
????????????? 
? ? ? ? ? Well, that is the question. 



) ) } ) ;> :> 



182 



THE INDEPENDENT CLUB 

The Independent Club is an organi- 
zation of the non-fraternity men on the 
campus and is the oldest organization on 
the campus. Last year "Mud" Clay with 
his ever increasing desire to promote some- 
thing, gathered a few of his clan around 
him. They then appointed a committee 
to draw up a constitution and to give the 
club a name. They decided on the Inde- 
pendent Club, to take the place of the 
"Barbs" "C. C. Social Club," "Scuds," 
and several other names. 

They entered a team in the sunrise 
league and finished close to the top. Their 
other activity that year was a stag banquet 
at the Broadmoor Hotel. 

On returning to school this year they 
decided that they should have functions 
like the other men's organizations. They 
held a Christmas function at the San 
Luis School which was conceded to be 
one of the best functions given that night. 
At their next weekly meeting they decided 
to have something to do every function 
night. At the present time they are 
planning a dinner dance at the Broadmoor 
for the next semester. 

The club sees a great future before it 
and they have decided the only way to 
keep interest in the club is to have meet- 
ings every Monday night, and to always 
be looking ahead to some activity. None 
of its rituals are secret and the Club is 
open to all students of Colorado College. 




OFFICERS 

President, Harry Newman Vice-President, Perkins Bushnell 

Secretary-Treasurer, Elmer Humphrey 
Student Commission Rep., Glenn G. Seott 



183 




184 



KAPPA SIGMA 




Founded at University of Virginia in 1869. Beta Gamma chapter established 1904. 

911 North Nevada Avenue. 



Pratres in CollEgio 



'22 



Ralph Hankins 



James E. Amos 
John Lawson 
Ray C. Green 
Hugh Morton 



Wilbur Hanes 
Francis Thomas 
Harold Richardson 
Floyd Padgett 
William Young 



Ralph Round 

'23 

Newell Bowman 
Charles Bemis 
Frank Mahan 
Lawrence Wolfe 

'24 

Morton Lewis 
Bruce Kestling 
Ryan Kay 
Elwin Arps 
Earl Louthan 
Milton Nelson 



Don Hunt 
Richard Davis 
Howard Morris 
Edward Morath 
Walter Forry 
Auburn Muncy 



Lee Williams 



C. C. Mierow 



'25 

Ezra Cornell 
Leslie Moreland 
Frank Awes 
Alfred Cox 
Glen Eaken 
Donald Doubt 
Robert Swan 

Pledges 

Wilson Clark 
Dick Dickinson 

Fratres in FacultaTE 

W. D. Copeland 
M. A. Jencks 



186 




187 



SIGMA CHI 




Founded at Miami University in 1855. Beta Gamma Chapter established in 1905. 

1117 North Nevada Avenue. 



FratrES in CollEgio 

'22 
Charles R. Ball A. R. C. Wardwell 

Ben S. Wendelken 

'23 

Malcolm D. Graham C. Russell Carter 

Jack Day wait Edward J. O'Brien 

Harold Waiss Curtis Hinton 



'24 



Cecil Tait 
Ralph Emery 
James Albert 
Roland Fisher 



Paige Benbow 
Robert Allen 
Edwin Maher 



'25 



Ray Darling 
Fred Williamson 
Campbell Rice 
George Croll 



Frank James 
William Hansen 
Robert Williamson 



Tom Thomas 



Pledges 

Harry Chapman Elmer Bell 

Morris Moseley Alex Chapman 

Guy Clark 



188 





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189 



PHI GAMMA DELTA 




Founded at Washington and Jefferson in 1848. Chi Sigma chapter established in 1908. 

1122 North Cascade Avenue. 



Joe Bruce 



Fratres in CollEgio 

'22 
Robert Hart 

'23 

Robert Mcllvaine 
Frank Parker 



'24 



Earl Harvey 
Edgar Howbert 
Reuben Olson 
Francis Ryan 



Jack Dern 
Russell Hunter 
Edward Patterson 
Clark Robinson 



Joe Atkinson 
Stanley Delaney 
James Jacobs 
Edward Ryan 



'25 

Harry Dawson 
La Vergne Harrison 
Albert Linger 
Kenneth Sewell 
Harold Staff 



Arthur Grav 



PLEDGES 

William Rose 

Fratres in Facultate 
Guy H. Albright 



Llovd Sherman 



190 




191 



PHI DELTA THETA 




Founded at Miami University in 1848. Colorado Beta Chapter established in 1913, 

1319 North Nevada Avenue. 



Fratres in Collegio 



Stuart Y. Armit 
Edmond A. Crockett 
Harry F. Taylor 



Myron E. Carter 
Bradley P. Kidder 



">? 



'23 



Frank N. Briggs 
Malcolm W. MacDougall 
John B. Jackson 



Carl A. Brumfield 
Orlando G. McDonald 



Perry P. Greiner 
Joseph T. Wessen 



'24 

Harold E. McBride 
Bertram W. Crockett 
George Keif 



'25 



Harold A. Briggs 
Robert H. Crowder 
Washington I. Hunter 
Samuel B. McCool 
Howard Tucker 



Charles L. Berry 
William W. Hamilton 
Francis E- MacDougall 
Proctor W. Nichols 
Alexander T. Taft 



192 




193 



BETA THETA PI 




Founded at Miami University in 1839. Gamma Delta Chapter established in 1914. 

727 North Nevada Avenue. 



Fratres in CollEgio 



'22 



Ian V. MaeKenzie 
Earl E- Lyons 



Eino Leino 

Lester C. MaeTavish 



'2.3 
Reith Strachan 



'24 
George Thatcher Olin D. Capps 

L. L. Johnson E. S. Eddins 

Howard Muneaster Albert Amidon 

Paul Sweeney 



Fred English 
James Flaherty 
Alfred E. Kyffin 



'25 



Russel DeFries 
Cecil Mcintosh 
Willard Crandall 



194 




195 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 




Founded at the University of Virginia in 1868. Beta Rho Chapter established in 1920. 

805 North Cascade Avenue. 



Beeeher W. Fawcett 



Fratres in COLLEGIO 

'22 
Allen D. Rice 



'23 



O. Carlton Dein Kenneth L. Gordon 

Donovan W. Kissinger Lawrence F. Koerner 

R. Warren Leisy J. Wilbur Nelson 

Lynn B. Wallis Theodore Winans 

Gibson Winans 



A. Ralph Owens 
Rae N. Taylor 



'24 



T. Herbert Sandford 
vSimeon Wilbur 



Waldron D. Fair 
Allan P. Marshall 
Lenoard W. Young 



Arthur Mathews 



'25 



Edwin A. Gardner 
Kenneth N. Ogle 
Marion M. Zickefoose 



PLEDGES 

U. Russell Miller 
Frank Y. Schaede 

Fratres in Facultate 
Paul E. Boucher 



196 




19T 



ALPHA NU 




Founded at Colorado College in 1920. 
412 North Tejon Street. 



Albert C. Lyles 



Fratres in CollEgio 

'22 

Vernon G. Scott 
Ira M. Hicks 



Wm. Keith Chick 
Richard B. Valore 
William C. Senning 



'23 



Lester A. Busey 
Clyde C. Phillips 
vSherman N. Bushnell 



Lester B. Powell 
Paul W. Sundbury 
George Anderson 



Ralph Strong 



'24 

Clyde R. Overholt 
Laurence E- Marschat 
Marvin Reinking 
John M. Mussey 

'25 



George Arms 

Pledges 
Lewis A. Chatham 

Fratres in Facultate 
Ralph J. Gilmore 



198 




199 




MEMBERS 



Kappa Sigma, Ralph Round, Lawrence 
Wolfe'. 

Phi Gamma Delta, Howard Linger, Robert 
Mcllvaine. 



Sigma Chi, A. R. C. Wardwell, Malcolm 
D. Graham. 

Phi Delia Theta, Frank Briggs, Myron E. 
Carter. 



Beta Theta Pi, 
Strachan. 



Karl E- Lyons, Reith Pi Kappa Alpha, Beecher Fawcett, Lynn 

Wallis. 



Alpha Nu, Albert C. Lyles, W. K. Chick. Faculty, A. B. Hulbert, C. C. Mierow. 



THE INTER- FRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 

The Inter-Fraternity Council, organ- 
ized in 1909, is an inter-fraternity group 
consisting of two members from each 
fraternity on the campus and two mem- 
bers of the faculty, one of whom is Presi- 
dent of the Council. The undergraduate 
members are elected by their respective 
fraternities as juniors and serve for two 
years; the faculty representatives are 
elected annually by each incoming council. 

The object of the Inter-Fraternity 
Council, as stated in its constitution, is 
"to promote the unity, scholarship and 
general welfare of the college through the 
discussion and regulation of fraternity 
matters." To this end regular meetings 
are held on the first Monday of each month 
of the college year. 

In 1920 the local fraternities of Colo- 
rado College were for the first time accord- 
ed representation in the council and ad- 
mitted to all its privileges on an equal 
footing with the chapters of the National 
Fraternities. 

Officers 

President, Charles C. Mierow 

Vice-President, Frank N. Briggs 

Secretary-Treasurer, Albert C. Lyles 

Representative to Student Commission, 
Howard K. Linger 



200 



ALPHA KAPPA PS I 

Alpha Kappa Psi is a professional 
business fraternity. It is not a social 
fraternity, nor is it an honorary scholar- 
ship fraternity although both these phases 
are considered in the selection of men for 
membership. Its stated purposes are: 
To promote the individual welfare of its 
members; to foster scientific research in 
the fields of commerce, accounts and 
finance; to educate the public to appreci- 
ate and demand higher ideals therein and 
to promote and advance in institutions of 
collegiate rank, courses leading to degrees 
in business administration. 

Alpha Kappa Psi was founded at New 
York University in 1904. The chapter at 
Colorado College received its charter in 
1919 and is known as Sigma Chapter. 
There are now twenty six chapters located 
in all parts of the United States. 

The local chapter holds monthly dinner 
meetings at which time some expert along 
some line of business addresses the mem- 
bers. Some of the speakers for this year 
were: Clarence P. Dodge, Gov. Oliver H. 
Shoup, Robert D. Sims, Arthur Perkins. 

For mock initiation the Alpha Kappa 
Psi pledges present a one act playlet in 
Chapel. It is one of the annual events of 
the college year and is further treated in 
the "Events" section. 




OFFICERS 

First Semester 
President, Wm. D. Copeland 
Vice-President, Harry F. Taylor 
Secretary, Edmond Crockett 
Treasurer, Eino Leino 

Second Semester 
President, Harry F. Taylor 
Vice-President, J. Elwood Amos 
Secretary, Robert S. Mcllvaine 
Treasurer, Keith Chick 



MEMBERS 

A. P. R. Drucker W. D. Copeland 

W. W. Postlethwaite Harry F. Taylor 

Keith Chick Edmond A. Crockett 

Myron E. Carter Ben S. Wendelken 

MalcolmMacDougall Frank Mahan 

M. A. Jencks Jacob Swart 

J. Elwood Amos Robert S. Mcllvaine 



Eino Leino 
Charles Bemis 
Lowell O. Collins 



C. Russell Carter 
James Park, Jr. 
Robert A. Hart 



Malcolm D. Graham 



201 




Officers 



President, C. A. Duniway 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Faculty Members 

J. P. Baxter, Edith C. Bramhall, 
Arthur E. Davies, C. A. Duniway, Ralph 
J. Gilmore, E- D. Hale, Martha Howbert, 
Archer B. Hulbert, Charles T. Latimer, 
Frank H. Loud, James G. McMurtry, 
Charles C. Mierow, Dorothy Printup, 
Charles H. Sisam. 



Vice- President, A. B. Hulbert 
, J- G. McMurtry 

Seniors 

Lorena Alice Berger, Edmond Allison 
Crockett, Rowena K. Hampshire, Olive 
Emelyn Haun, Suoma Thalempi Leino, 
Marion Little, Albert Clayton Lyles, Mary 
Clegg Owen. 

Juniors 

James Caldwell Park, Jr., Ruth Staff. 



PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

The Phi Beta Kappa Society, the oldest 
American Greek letter fraternity, was 
founded at William and Mary College in 
Virginia in the days of the Revolution, 
December 5, 1776. Though not originally 
intended as a society of scholars, it has 
always fostered a love of wisdom and 
sound learning, and the cardinal principles 
of the philosophy which its founders took 
as their guide of life are Fraternity, 
Morality and Literature. 

It numbers among its members such 
men as John Ouincy Adams, James Gar- 
field, Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow 
Wilson. By their eloquence Daniel Web- 
ster and Phillip Brooks have shed and 
added lustre upon its honorable past. 
Poets and men of letters too — Bryant, 
Emerson, Hawthorne, Holmes, Longfellow 
and Lowell — are in its cherished hall of 
fame. 

Chapters of the society were formed at 
Yale and Harvard as early as 1781, and 
after that at Dartmouth, Union and 
Bowdoin. At present there are 93 chap- 
ters in the United States. 

The Colorado College chapter — Beta 
of Colorado — was the fifty-ninth to be 
organized and secured its charter from the 
United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa on 
December 7, 1904. 

The Colorado College chapter elects 
each year one-seventh of the members of 
the graduating class less two, primarily on 
the basis of scholarship. To this number 
are added two members of the junior class. 



202 



KAPPA BETA PHI 

College communities are often unfair. 
The shark has been caressed by his pro- 
fessors and envied by his classmates. He 
has been the recipient of scholarships, 
honor awards, and other rewards for 
superior gray matter, while the faithful 
and industrious bonehead has been allow- 
ed to pursue his thorny way thru a wilder- 
ness of mathematics, French and econom- 
ics without so much as a smile; when after 
the fourth attempt he manages to secure 
a passing grade in mathematics and secure 
a diploma, he enters a world where men 
are no longer ranked by an unnatural 
ability to recite the family history of a 
Spanish verb from the days of Le Cid. 

Not the least of the indignities heaped 
upon the bonehead is the sight of a golden 
key dangling from its owner's watch fob 
or brazenly displayed on her chest as if 
to say, "I have brains. Don't waste my 
time." But even the worm will turn and 
so Kappa Beta Phi and Beta Kappa Phi 
came into existence. Kappa Beta Phi 
was originated some years ago and was 




HAGERMAN HALL 



composed of men who failed of election 
to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Beta Kappa Phi was founded in 1910 
and was the organization of the women 
corresponding to Kappa Beta Phi which 
was entirely made up of men. For the 
last four years Beta Kappa Phi has been 
dormant but Kappa Beta Phi has never 
lost an ounce of vigor and is going strong 
even at this late date. 



MEMBERS 

Charles Ball Albert Lyles* 

John Jackson Lester MacTavish 

Malcolm Graham William D. Copeland 
Frank Napoleon Briggs 



* Expelled. 



203 



iSiSSI 




Founded at Indiana University in 1912. Colorado College 
Chapter established in 1914. 

SENIORS 

Frank Briggs Malcolm MacDougall Malcolm Graham Albert Lyles 

Harold Waiss Edward Patterson Charles Bemis 

Lester MacTavish Perry Greiner 

JUNIORS 

Vernon G. Scott Charles Page Floyd Padgett Tom Seeley 

Hugh Morton Wm. Young 



SIGMA DELTA PS I 

vSigma Delta Psi is the National Ath- 
letic fraternity. Membership is acquired 
by passing certain requirements stated 
below. There are two classes of members, 
seniors and juniors. Those passing the 
senior requirements are entitled to wear 
the key and those passing junior require- 
ments wear the pin. 

Senior Requirements — 100 yard run 
in 11 3-5 seconds; 220 yard (low) hurdles, 
each 2 ft. 6 in. high, in 31 seconds, leaving 
all standing; running high jump 5 ft.; 
running broad jump 17 ft.; shot put for 
men 160 pounds in weight 30 ft., being 
scaled down accordingly for men of lighter 
weight; pole vault 8 ft. 6 in.; throwing 
baseball 250 feet on fly; punting football 
120 ft. on fly; 100 yards swim (continuous 
without floating or other rest) ; 2 mile run 
in 12 min. 15 sec; 10 mile walk in 2 hours 
and 30 min.; Tumbling hand-stand main- 
tained without walk for 10 seconds. 

Junior Requirements — 100 yard run 
in 12 sec; 220 yard low hurdles in 33 sec. 
leaving all standing; running high jump 
4 ft. 6 in.; running broad jump 15 ft. 
Shot put same as senior standing except 
distance is 25 ft.; pole vault 7 ft. 9 in.; 
throwing baseball 200 ft. on fly; punting 
football 90 ft. on fly; 50 yards swim con- 
tinuous without rest; 2 mile run in 14 
min.; 10 mile walk in 3 hrs.; Tumbling 
hand-stand; same as for senior. 



204 



DELTA EPSILON 

Delta Epsilon, the honorary scientific 
society of Colorado College was organized 
by the faculty Research Committee dur- 
ing the college year 1920-21. Final recog- 
nition by the faculty was granted at a 
meeting on May 9, 1921. 

The purpose of the organization is to 
stimulate interest in scientific research and 
achievement. Membership is limited to 
the teaching staff and to students doing 
major work in the departments of Biology, 
Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Ge- 
ology and Psychology. 

Requirements for membership include 
a balanced course in which creditable 
records must be made and evidence of 
exceptional ability in the major subject. 

The organization at Colorado College 
is the first of its kind in the United States. 
Other colleges similar to Colorado College 
are considering organization. 

Members 



R. J. Gil more 
C. H. Sisam 
R. R. Tileston 
T. A. Keyte 
G. H. Albright 
P. E. Boucher 
F. M. Brumback 
W. M. Spingler 
T. F. Kaufman 



F. W. Douglas 
H. R. Fling 
A. E. Davies 
T. H. C. vSmith 
F. H. Loud 
W. V. Lovitt 
E. W. Gerould 
A. R. Wopple 
A. C. Lyles 



C. E. Shaffer 
Non-resident Members 
H. E. Murphy C. M. Stanton 

H. C. Jolly M. P. Scribner 

B. Hoag 




OFFICERS 
1921-22 

President C. H. Sisam 

Secretary-Treasurer R. J. Gilmore 

1922-23 

President R. J. Gilmore 

Secretary-Treasurer F. W. Douglas 



2 05 




ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Faye Lilley Prof.W.D.Copeland Doris Haymes 

Lowell O. Collins Rowena Hampshire 

Harry F. Taylor 
Carl A. Brumfield A. R. C. Wardwell 



THETA ALPHA PHI 

Theta Alpha Phi is a national dramatic 
fraternity, having been established at 
Oklahoma A. & M. College in 1920. Colo- 
rado College received her charter in Feb. 
1920, and was the eleventh college admitted 
to membership. There are now twenty- 
eight chapters in the United States which 
reach from Connecticut to California and 
from Wisconsin to Florida. The object of 
the fraternity is to stimulate a general 
interest in play production and to raise 
dramatics to a higher plane in the list of 
college activities. 

At the beginning of this college year 
only two members were left on the campus, 
W. D. Copeland and Harrv F. Taylor. 
In October seven others were pledged 
three men and foui women. Initiation was 
held in Cogswell Theater, followed by a 
dinner in Bemis Hall and coffee in Miss 
Phinney's parlor. In the evening the 
fraternity saw John E. Kellary in "The 
Merchant of Venice." 

On February tenth the Misses Gertrude 
Sherk and Frances Tucker and Mr. El- 
wood Amos were pledged. "The Only 
Girl," a play with music, has been selected 
for the annual play. This will be present- 
ed at the Burns Theatre under the direc- 
tion of Mr. E- Benson Sargent and the 
management of the Community Dramatic 
Workshop. 



206 



TAU KAPPA ALPHA 

National Honorary Forensic Fraternity. 

• Tau Kappa Alpha is one of the few 
fraternities on the campus that signifies 
actual achievement. Membership is 
limited to those who have represented the 
college in an intercollegiate debate or 
oratorical contest. In addition to this 
national prerequisite, the local chapter 
imposes certain other qualifications of 
character, ability and leadership. For 
this reason Tau Kappa Alpha is necessari- 
ly a small and limited organization. Due 
to the fact that membership is actually 
always given to upper classmen only, the 
fraternity has few members during the 
first of the year and hence activities are 
limited. 

Tau Kappa Alpha was founded at 
Indianapolis, May 13, 1908. The fra- 
ternity has advanced rapidly, until at the 
present time there are fifty-two active 
chapters in the leading colleges and uni- 
versities all over the country. Chapters 
are located at Harvard, Purdue, Ohio, 
Columbia, Utah, Washington, and Indiana 
Universities and at many other foremost 
institutions of higher learning. 

Colorado Chapter was organized at 
Colorado College in 1916, largely through 
the efforts of Professor Motten. At the 
present time it is composed of the follow- 
ing members: Elwood Amos, Jack Dern, 
Charles Kimble, Robert Mcllvaine, Frank 




Mahan, and Ben Wendelken from the 
student body, and William Copeland, 
Professor Pattee, and Professor Swart from 
the faculty. Ben Wendelken was elected 
president of the organization and Frank 
Mahan was appointed manager of de- 
bating. 

The badge of the fraternity is a gold 
watch key. It is in the form of a scroll, 
and displays the letters of the fraternity 
within a wreath. 



Officers 

President, Ben Wendelken 
Secretary-Treasurer, Jack Dern 

Members 

Professor Swart Professor Pattee 

Mr. Copeland Elwood Amos 

Jack Dern Charles Kimble 

Frank Mahan Robert Mcllvaine 

Ben Wendelken 

Pledges 
Ernest Sheppard John Duniway 



207 



^ _ IN THE DAYS OF ?9~ 




208 




210 



1921 



f\ \m. I L 



le enj*oy H ye 
olde Cyme afcving 
j-acation". 



ff.iaeWa hoaoVa 
Camp Cau-etey 
jitith a hou.ae 
pavCy. 



:oei not wCe \{ e/U! 
»iCh .i.o£ u p p ^. J. 

2 JU .1 to 3'iuVc h • 



ihe- "StvCe" en- 
ioy a dano© oV 
Ciuo Co p Vo p e V t y 
piniah Che hot- 
i i a y a • 



"Qo-od mo-vai-ng to 

yOU, ° "Q-O-od moVar 

ing, d«av tw&h- 

o^ai a. 



1)11,.' (J-inWoa. m, 
Se-mia-, ■ don-oV o'p- 
gem-i* Wa-t-C, diea 
in. Soaton. 



"l°oiae, Puvbo-*'®, 
aad Pevapect-tue" 
ia the heritage 
op CO. aeootdiag 
Co Qoha 3. ^hedd, 
povmevtu Pvop- op 
! d hitaic.a aC C.C. 



" JUm " d tahevty 
inatvgatea a u 3of 
aheu-if?" jaaVade Co 
tooat Che 'JaVaiu- 
a{, Gptei- pavade 
cia^^ea- jueve vatd 
ed and the atadi 
on! Van Cn"uu the 
j • i r r, ; - , 



ivg Uthietic yav- 
aii>at ia Coaavtt. 
Uaudeu-iite, aicn>v6a 
ht>VVoV»,' toitiv 
coaaCev without 
^oit-etft', aioimm vng 
match, tvip to 
f ava, , ©to aa 



Tvaa .^hinnetJ 2e{ 
euvatea nsv ? 
Utvtndau aa- a o a t~ 
eii to tae hatt 
givfa sis. 



nu-a^Mwv^, *>htneae 
and C^gybtiana en 
teltaia at the 
'•BoV tnightiy 
iRetan Ctuu 
Puao tioa. 



<3he ICudent Coin— 
miaaion t>egina 
e-teetioa VePoVma 
aa* auggea-ted ia a 
veceat 3igev edi- 
toviai. 



Ivw Ci-"t"t-i-a<n '.fa-iX 
Che fcveaident'a 
aecvetaVy, announ 
o&a aev eagage— 
meaC. 



- noJ> [>e^vna Co 
patt Ciiie wiaCev 

Cime. 



C.veaC yo&a op 
aaox> atop oCC a.th 
letic ei>eata poV 
the tueeh end. 



'Joa Cempova Vy tnt- 
CiaCea aist givta, 
3jio PeeC op inw 
a'poita jjs-efe-ead 
'p a v C i e a ♦ 



^otovado jueatheV 
veducea Che aaou> 
to leaa Chaa aix 
iaehea. Oaty tVu- 
Py 1,eligioua go 
to jhulofi. 



Vopeaaov ™ 1 1 v i g- h 
diaeoueva a time— 
aauiag PoVmuia in 
the atudy op va- 
d vum. 



" i'e hau-e ao 'JmeV 
ieaa muaic, rneve- 
-ty a Pol-m op de- 
■Civium tvemeaa 
aiaoe f VohibiCioa 
-Chapel apeafeev. 



^Vopea-a-oV SJVuehe" 
aad hia- aaaiat- 
aaCa l>egia eam- 
baiga f-oV fraCh 
houae pov Pape- 
Coi>a. 



Rotaviaaa deteat 
!{-uu>aaiaaa oa .'.aa 
tul^a pietd, 13- I 



"3tt-op-a-aaddea 

i-eggu" ia pv-eaen 
ed l>u C.itia' fcva- 
r-.atio C£ut>. Kete 
■3hel>ua atava aa 



Dhe 3-ugeva n>vn 
Che Ce'tephoae 
Ci-ao^ meet pvom 
3he Gggiea 8?-3<: 



"i.eav no ei>it, h~ and Hi. Vun- 

ice no euit, apea i i'Jjay entettain 



3ae U A C Q in- 
ducea aei>evat 
givta to ao to 
a.nu von. 



ike I q 2 I (lugget 
g o e a Co Che 6- i a d • 
ev, 



^VoPeaaoV Oi-tea- 
toa detiu-eva a 
popuiav teetuve 
oa the S-tectl-oa 
theoVy . 



•3he iofehomotea 
eatevCaia the 
'3owa givta at aa 
iapovmat dance ia 
■3icfanoV itudu. 



■}ne. teaaia touVa 
a meat ia deL>eiop 
ing aorne p-tne ma- 
tevia-t. ^.'inaev 
■joili vepveaent C . 
at .tJoutdev. 



no ei>ii." 3neve'a 
no vepeveace to 
pvinCiag. 4canda{ 
aneet apceava. 



the ^uniova. 



ou 



211 



1921 



i. \-. y. 'oo;- 
'--uty, pstionat 
f^tiend o-t r.'aiph 
'.'atdo Srcetfton, 
attii>e* Co C-eti 
y r 'J» at-t ofrout 
'.t a a a -I a . 



Jon Cem|aotaty sn- 
De^tovna -tntoVm— 
atiy at Svene, 
Stene .trio? 



1'ay 1'au aonga and 
dance hoia aiuay 
tn Che 2uad. i. U 
deCeaCft u» in 
uaaetaii c-2. 



Ceino and 'A'ata- 
luett ate enosen 
to ediC and man- 
age tne Diget (-at 
Che yeat lq2l-22 



iofchomote tiai>4 
ahooaea u-oatd Co 
eiecuCe Cfiia Nug- 
get. Capital pun 
"uO-niBent, wfiaC? 
Von fileillvttan e-tec 
b-t«ai,aen f o(- iCua 
enC woiaiauon. 



Ka-t-C gitta etecC 
ptifton o(-tiaiata, 
•3oiun aivtft eiecE 
oi-ticetft. 'tlaty 
Ciegg ptei>enta 
icihotm'a touaii- 
tveos uieeFi. 



"!?ta SunipaCeaa- 
Ceigh" -to. tveienC 
ea Uu tj uniota. 
.'.e nadn ' C tea t- 
iaed^otift Vayrr.ea 
u) aft *ngtiah. 



-.- r.e junaai; -jag — 
eCLe C e 1 1 a C n e 
cot Cegejf &iuosn Ca 
Cnat teaift-Ctation 
14- go-tng on -oi 
next y e at . 



t-.r.ottav aetuiee 
i.c1 <! u a a o n f- . ? e 
;r. vi, lit £ennox en 
Cettaina SuCetpe. 
.'lit i/e-cCa :3heCa 
isl&ivadea deCen— 
1 1 o n noir.ea. 



s i Vftt m e e C i n g oi 
nea. -*tudenC Com— 
mift-aion. f?en 
fcweeC tutnft oi>et 
tne ga+et to &on 
Ifclfli-ttan. 



6 Vo(.e4<n>1 Hut- 
(vevt i>uii& a &av, 
a-o nia- nift-toty 
ctaa-a 4ai(4. he 
aaya, "He Gmetican 
ate no ionget Cta 
uei-ieta, meteiu 
attiuaift." 



Kappa i'iga iegin 
Co tooh ouet can— 
didaCeft tot friay 
2ueen, Chen atana 
• Citft-G in tne 
in-Cet— -f-tatetni Cu 
taaetcti ieaaue. 



I'.haC cotot cot- 
aage? " "CJtchid a! " 
iiytaaCia hotda pot 
Dial aC the ttoaa 
moot koCet. 



itaCetntCu nitel 
I" ii i i e i € c -J r.eZa 
tot-rat. '. e T.anrn 
Oqgiea S-0 in 
yaaeoatt. 



"tonaon Cooft 
t-Ce'-a on c aCtit- 
ed R-Lttu. Chatt- 
Con Jannon teau-ea- 
"-'eaay i-L Caustu'a 
Jai>tna oo-et nia-h-t 



(catty -in Che 
motning) CftattCon 
'Jiilte* hift ctothe 



Piana ^ot tfve fray. 
3e»-tivat a-t-e fcut>- 

tifthe-d. °3fie 
baa-te ' ft 'ftinq, 
ui-i-th Dlailiuft-l-uat " , 
i-ft tfie ttoC. 



Pto|. Ktt-l&el-t 
fttatt-tea ua (>y an 
noutitt-lftj, "tTany 
toan-ij-e tiaavdft l>e 
come ^ -Ct^ad-t-et— 
Btvnd-tea " 



Ce^aCe luttn Porno 
na Cottege. 5[ !» 
auggea-Ced Chat n 
iudgea te ufted to 
i-naute an audtenct 



Hego d-aCtona (-ot 
•Che ?ot(i Ceair- -Co 
go Co "u-anftCon, 
Sit. to fctay 
(lot ChuueaCetn. 



£i>6r\ uj-uC'n ^'tigga 
piC-chtng, on en — 
C-ttetu nex at— 
t a n g e rr e n C , -i> e 
toae -Co ff-ineo 1-6 



i-. ^-uni-Aiau utgea 
".onot in Che com— 
-ng sxair.inaCiona. 



Coiotado £fcvinga' 
oion- hetoine, Qaaa 
ueiine £t>gan, as 
,;eata in the mou- 
-i- e a in the " !- e t - 
{-ecC Ctime " 



•Jtyouta ate hetJ 
tot "l^tuneita", 
the iaa-t gaa'p oi- 
Che 1 920-2 I 3it-t,a 

ita-:aCic Ctuu. 



Jhe 'en ' a .'> tee 
Jiut |;uCa on a 
teguiat H^su? 
a h o -i> in '- e t p. i n a . 
.'. aihotrr Gi3 ttu^i- 
tista aCat. 



■SmfDteaaiue memot 
iai ae-tu-iee vat 
C. C. «oat aead. 
'le freat S.U. U- I 
Jhe gitta' aoci- 
sCiea fcteage. 



"uetyn utnota ia 
^uecn ot t.ie ."ay 
v£aCti>at, oi- 
c-outae— the i-nt 
;eiiO tuor. tne 
ca.rtua champion 



'tcaC roja o(- aot 
:--eti ited ChaC -o 
m v a 1 1 C rate Cnia 



t°teatdcnC Ivuniu^ay 
aa;ia: "J.'fiaC Uiouid 

you h a u e done? " 
( S (. a ui a i C e t t e - 
(-u&ed to aetu-e 
you in a h i 1 1 
ateeuea ) 



212 



1921 J UN E 1921 








uir-ta-' outdoor 
tracft meet o-n 
A'aa-nburn 3ietd. 
3en CC'a. awarded 
tor exce-t-tence in 
gym. ?im wfio? 


SaVon uon Cotdren 
advertises "roiiu 
with a Pact" in 
cha'pe-t. Somen's 
Othtetie Soard 
dinner in ftemis. 


Uthietic -tetters 
awarded to att 
men earning them 
this year. 


Sirst day op 
eaams. 


tio "ue&t tor de-tin 
fluent atudenta. 

5 


fit. Joodenougn 
aay» fie doesn't 
48e aay u^e -In 
iinai«>. '.tno e-tfte 
aaya a-o? 


2ueet, ion't it, 
how -littie you 
fettoto aiiout that 
St-encn and ban- 
ian? 


ll'hat good ale 
those Iq22 regit- 
tl/at-io-n cards? 


"Oint it a al-and 
and g-lorious J^ee-t 
in ' " to haue 
exams a-t-t ouer? 
Senior fc^-cy sho'jjs 
to f-u-t-t house at 
Earns. 


aup-per £or the 
graduates at Pres 
ident i'uniway's 
home- Commence- 
ment recita-t lii) 
'fi-tdred fficH.urtry. 


3rarvces 3ucfter 

ana t>rean- 

£ast tne Phi 
ietta 3heta b-aii 
team. 


raccaiaut-eate 
Aetmon t>y fieu, 
flau-l&, bva-a--uclervt 

■3heo-io-9-i.ca't iem- 
tnaty. 


C-taaa £ou eiev- 
ei&ea. Phi Seta 
Kappa addveftr&. 


Conteirrt>o'i,a^i|i and 
.Wi^atia aiumna-e 
liveafe^ao-to. Ciaaa 
vcuniono. Recep- 
tion to graduate*, 
at tne Presidents, 
fvome. 


Commencement. 
3ne addres-s is 
giuen uy Won. 
■^har-tes £.■ Dhomas 
ot fient>eV. Q-turr.ni 
iunefteon at the 
9eaci.a. 


3areweii, '21. 
































• 



213 



1Q01 



3oott>ai"t (aVactiae 
fregiwa. ItluVi/ay'ft 
t-ooRa good.' Ha-Ci 
ivta ooie &acfe in 
aVge nuii>eV^ 
»«« not »o ia<tg« 



fi»giatVation day 

d-outd 3d -^ti-Holvtuj 
to aooia dctial. 
f.in« tot tate veg 
ia'tvation. ftlu-cn 
ado a-Wut -btedg» 
ing to fAata-. ' 



Beginning o£ ctaa 
>e» and acquaint 
atieea-.,' Sigftta 
mote a-tudenta leg 
i^teved t&an. ia;yt 
ueaV. 



ieada- ena^ei »in.g 
ing. "^au-rv-lt u-Ltft 
ftu^ic" 3vVft-t ft»e- 
iai f-unetion, 
U It C tea in 
Semi,*. 



2 



Swan tick &opn* 
■In dnnua-t 3£ag 
1/UtA.' Sita-t -(.o-Vm 
at ena^ei. ClU- 
©oitege deception 
in Coaaitt. 



3 



3ne {vevetofote 
^Wud fAat fj>iedg« 
rvouo tenda nimaetf. 
to nouae and uavd 
cleaning. He* 
-footfraii -o-teaon 
eV* -teing 1.a^- 
id-i-v eomfrieted 



Sve-a-nmen £iocti 
Sunday tcfiooi. 
Co't-tege fiaij Q 't 
3ivat Congl-ega 
tiona-i Cnu.Vcn. 
iundau Sua-aing 
*uuie ta&ea epye 
fTanu aigna. 



to 



at 



3oum 4i' l 'i*' 'pic- 
nic in Monument 
Uaiieu Pal-fe.. 
Cnafce-t a-eata- fco«.t 
ed; manu ^eniota 
a'it »itn iafcno- 
move-a ^evfoA-ec* 



vivta' 3iee Ciut 
pvacticea C.C.- 
»»na* undcv di- 
rection o-f- ftutn 
S\o»in. 



ftegaial. Gnnuai 
t^vo^tft- fot- ai\ia 
aiee Ciu-fr in. Pet- 
fcina. Itlan-u »)jeo- 
tatol-a. at £oot- 
iia-t-t jyvacti,ce; 
3'woc^i onoui ufc 
oueii. 



EenioVa and &o|ina 
etect. Ctyiea »en 
iol. 1s1.c-o.ide.nt and 
tlla-Wocfe i'o'pn pvea 
ident. 3wa-n 
eiect Gt&inaon 
oj/f-ioiai wood— 
qatneWu.. 



ijiria hotd get- 
acquainted i>aA/— 
tiea. 

Ha-umea cnoa-en 
ueii ieadel. at 
f-ivat ■pep meet- 
ing in stadium. 



C I » I 2H; Cen- 
tennial 0: 3ige1<a 
36; 3toafi 0. iael 
4o» ia oat of- 
-f-oot-tcii tecauae 
o-f- fieaitfi. 



ta>e*n 1 jtnino quiet 
af-Cel, a f-euu js-tedgc 
Nonquota and 
dancer -tatvt- nite. 
Cnul-e-tv attendance 
d-to^ia aa -teaa-ona 
gl-oio natdeY. 



3ne £il,at edition 
o£. tne 3iael. ai»- 
tiea'va.' Cnape't 
ta-tfea ai-»en o-n tne 
3iaeV. Sino Ceino 
ia editoV» 



3vua-t meetina 
Jivia' Jice Ctu6. 
fieeiaion aoaina-t 
Qii Coi-C-eoe dance 
(Jaeftaon ia cnail, 
man ot Sntnuaiaam 
committee. 



6ig ■pet meeting 
ataged f.ol' men 
and giv<.a dttving 
ena-pei time. 
Q^acnt SYea^imen 
aVs ducfeed t)-u oV 
deV of- &ou UlcHli-t- 
tan. 



Px-eaident fiuni- 
iuau and Bon UcBli 
tan a-fc>oiogige io 
ueatetday-a ducfe- 
vm}», lociai 
committee maRea 
out -£.ivat aemea- 
teV acnedute. 



^cfiotuvanib taifta 
and ■p-ve-a-entation 
of. Pl-eo.ident ' a 
eufc to Qt-pna Hu. 
Sig jsefc meeting 
in atadium» 



214 



1921 



nrm 



WW 



1Q91 



C.C. beats Uxand 
-Sstand, fleuXasfsa 
31-1. PatteXson 
and Bait staX (oi 
C.C. S-La Cxouid, 
much pe|o. 



/-atr^na Co j-voan 
qixis u>ho aisobeu 
iurvdcv {.ussinq 
Vu{e&. i/i>en. lT ; a n — 
itou isn't a saf.e 
fctace f. o X stolen 
tele— a-tetes. 



-Ian 

us 

eha 

men 

O.ss 

tix 



a I he; 
chuXen 
a Jinc 
pet. -3 
'a GU* 
o a i a t i o 
st tune 



ot the 

butex- 
giu-es 
ta-tfi -In 
he Ito— 
etie 
n ho-tds 
he-on. 



G-tpha Kappa Psi 
holds its annuat 
initiation -In 
ehapei, pledges 
numbextng ten. 
■5 he Hugget Boaxd 
has its £txst 
meeting of ueaX. 



his second tatfe. 
3fie usual Xusli 
f-oX lunation 
dates begins. 



IT.ee 
tsh 
stu 
pos 
exc 
the 
3 CM, 

dan 



n r^ cj| a t . 



ting o 
club, 
dent o 
•tboned 
I temen 
gtvis 
na to 
ee torn 



f span- 

Usual 
na'pe-t is 

lucil 
t a m o n a 

mno axe 
tne 
oXXow 



asses aX 
o-xt so W 
fee tne t 
txatn. 
i>a. Hupa 
d Contem 
thelx 
nee to-X 



cut 
oan 
earn to 
TTi-Ltv— 

tta, 
poxaXy 

annual 
tne neuu 



-3fie -(.-Ixs-C It Q 
ftlfee ot the ueat 
to ^uthe-xtand 



Cane 



Iti 



on. '.'.yomxng 
Is beaten in ^oot 
bati 10-0. CtngeX 
and Sail aXe 
gXeat C. C. champs 



bexteet dat; 
u; n i e h t e ad s many 
to "ittt u'p thexX 
eyes unto tne 
hxtis" and uitsn 
that Sunday Xu-tes 
didn't pXohibtt 
Mussina. 



i'x. 

to 

aXs 

and 

aXe 

a'pp 

o| 

5 a * 

iree 



H'unxuia 
us atou 
hip. 3 

Cafct. 

gluen 
iause b 
la tuxd a 
e, Usuat £xat 
Cinqs 



ly ta-tfes 
it schol 
ine team 

L'in aeX 

qXeat 
>eeause 
Ji* '& 



ine Seta 
txa a i i> e 
txea-t as 
to -teaXn 
se ot "C 
men ". i 
annuat b 
! c 'atTtieX a> 
3xosh seaXen 



oXches- 

us a 
uje tx-u 
the uex 
otoXado C 
obns hotd 
anquet in 
hite 



■3he usual a-ttex- 
c hap el txee £-lght 
uion by the £cbhs. 
is bxeceded by a 
ta-th f-Xom &X. | "Jun 
tuiay about going 
to excesses in 
clas-s eelebxatlon 
■-3 tag .'prx-Co. Ctg.n i.a 9U 



OXo 

Hun 
cla 
5un 
ond 
oU 
ot 



sn e-te 
t pex 
ss p-Xe 
ioxs h 
nomin 
ieexs. 
3xench 



ct Son 
aient 
sident. 
oid sec- 
ation o£. 
rfeetino 
Cixete. 



dsemeste 
ain^ "'3n 
X Hat" a 
qsiueti t 
amattc ^ 
p meetin 
adium 
efes ta-tfe 



etams 
Ofon- 
vu-en in 
xts 



a xn 
Xa 



C.C, teats lieu; 
rieitoo 1-0. Jxat 
niqnt, luitn tne 
usuat ttixi-tts. 



•Sn ansiuex to the 
aueXu, "'that is 
so XaXe as a dau 
in 9une? " one 
miahC sau, "On 
Dctoliex oundav". 



HI. 

to 

too 

(>Xa 

(>ix 



i t a £ £ 
us o t t 
xac^es- 

0-xa 
th, and 



Califs 
he axis 
o£ 
uun, 
(iootu. 



Student 
ion meet 
aoming 'p 
aiscusse 



'wommxss- 
s. Wome- 
tanS aXe 

d. 



JLO 



«ei>.. ita^i t 
some moxe, 
midse«estex 
stiit in pxo 
and tne time 



atfes 

Ue 

eiams 
Xes a 
io ht 



3he ^lunioXs etect 
Haxxiet Sumstead 
ciass bxesident. 
epanisn c-tub i 

meets, .rv, li'iexoiw 
tatfes in oh a 'pet 
on Homecoming. 



friss .Aoxdon of- 
the Somen's £du- 
cat^-ongt Society 
jatks to f uSv.- 
Pep meetina and 
toxchiight paxade 
downtown. 3ixst 
tuio ptaus oi- sea- 



Utah wins 1H-S 
oi>ex C.C. M 4-tant ,, 
is mo\e than f»el 
the "titt|.e txn 
god" t>i the cott- 
eoe. "C" ctuU 
dance. 



&V 



-eauorifi. 



^ Xeat autumn s un 
day juith "-jiat-tina 
teaues and tading 
tioaiexs". Soij, 
page If.X. .Cong|et- 
to'jc. 

Otumni -teau-tng 
on 30-tn. 



^leu. ita(.j- com- 
'ptete-a f.is sexies 
op tatiis luith the 
announcement tnat 
the txue axistoc- 
tac-y is one ot 
sexuice, 
Kign fcchoo-t eeie- 



ix. fteinhaxdt ot 
lliiiis coiiege 
tatks on iante. 
Keith Chiofi edits 
tne 'jigex uihiie 
ciino lieino is in 
the hos'pitai. 



; 3he li It C 3 and 
li 1H C fl tafe oi>£X 
cha'pet uiitft songs 
and speeches, i'a- 
aaX-d Johnson, the 
tamous tenoX, is 
at the SuXns to- 
night. 



Vomecomxng ptans 
comptete. CunioX, 
ioph, and 3xosn 
classes levying 
taaces to pay 
Qi>exaiue fr-ilis. 
3xench c-tut- meets 



PaXade at II: 30 
do a^texnoon 
ctcsses. Hupatia 
giues -tea toX mem 
u-exs and axumnae 
o-theX socie* 
xes.' ^axuecue at 
1:30, ^.itne-u j-ig 
tiit 10: 30. 



It 



^.ocietu tixeafe- 
i^asts ana initi- 
ations. 3xosh 
beat iacxed Heaxt 
1-0. Oggies win 
^.Xom us 24-0, 
touan -tuo-fe, me 
ca-t-ts it. , fean- 
quet^ in Cossitt 
dnd :«,.-, 



215 



1921 



6o<> ItlcSl-tuoirte 
tatna on 9udaon fl 
Bemia, a gveat 
patton o£ C.C. 
dttiden-t o»iiiv»»- 
ioti ieet». 



3ne uaua-£ lUednea— 
day wneve notning 
muen aeema to 
fta^peTi, a midweek 
-tet-do-ton , aa It 
■jjete. 



§o-n.» Qac&aon 
f-io-fita ttavd £ot a 
Souidet abeeiai; 
no uae. flit. Wui- 
bevt »pea(ti. I8ia 
beb meeting -in 

^oaaitt , U>-ttri 
rr uen ainging. 



3ne team -teai>ea 
iot iSienu-et. ti'u, 
Bojct^t ta-£f*a on 
fiia-atmamen-t. 
Suetyo-ne eacoited 
ot>et tomottou>. 



vhe ^ r L,. jeeiron 
i&te Dfion titted 
at iBouidet. 'I'e 
{o4« 3B-|t(. D'ar.y 
dtiue ub tot -tfe 
game . 



3rte co-t-tege ia 
atmoat deaevfced, 
due- to- vne numbet 
o^ atudenta ve— 
m-aining in SJenuet 
and Boutdet oi>et 
Sunday. 



o-f 

t 

too 
add 
J>ia 
i-eA 
t«n 



5oh 
tne 

kttm 
ttan 
ve»» 
qVio 
ence 
cne 



n Ifluitnead 
Uniuetaity 
inaf.ain , 
d, gii>ea 

on the 
merit Con- 

il' 

(5 



student body »end 
teiegtam to Ptea- 
tdent Hatding en- 
dotaing tfie i'ia— 
atmarr.ent Conf-e-t— 
ence. 



n vti 



rerm 



'?en Cn eVl>-Lua-C©n 

H tfte y m c o 

taika to tfie 5c 
and Sua atudenta 
about Sutofae'a 
fleeda. 5na.-i.gnv* 

Slav W«4 oi-'t me-t-t 



Kinnifcinnife efiap- 
Pet o£ tne foufi 
pteaenta « (.-tag 
to ^L. lottn -tm-btea 
aii>e ceternony. 
Pep meet-tng tn 
Coaaitt 1: 30. 
Q-te« 3a£t ia tne 
atat afceaftet. 



Gtmia-tiee Say. 
3fie ■pioo m-tnutea 
oi attent ptayel- 
Qbaeti>ed at 1 6 01 
Baby •J.tgeta beat 
"eaacneta IH-0. 



iVvnea deieata CC 
■pep" iteir; 
and out of. 



ftut-t 



-One game tot the 
ye»i of- "tne yeat, 
ilany go to ven- 
uet £ot the »e«\- 
end» 



'Ofte uaua-t tou-tTne 
o-£ ia-gineaa and 
-teaa^na, i>atied 
»y *v«a-ta and mu- 



Vo-ui ta-tna 
aet-non 
utneniana. 



8-ino Ceino teaum 
ea -tne Sdi-tot'a 
e-ftait o^. -tfie Si- 
get. Kev-tn Cn-te-fe 
naa hand-ted -t-t 
a-inoe Ce-lno'a 
t-tineaa. ^ong iex 
utce at cna'bei. 



iV t . 
o-n 

to 



fr'-ve 
Pau-t 

tfie 



»V. C.P.Codge 
-ta-tfea a-t efia'fce-t 
iol. -tne U II' C 
and I! ft C £ on 
^ea-tetn Europe. 
(P.^a. Sdu)a^da, hi 
-outel-, Waixv 
-3avCo*L, ono Cat! 
Sl/ump-t-e-td a-lng. 



QoT--la Hagmea tafea 
ofiaije of- ofea ; 'pe-t. 
3ne *tvU' Glee 
C-tut naa atsoiai 
xeneavaa-t. S-i-g 
anow ato'vni. 2^an — 
-tali ctufc meeta. 



Dfie ttvl*« a»eVe- 
t-tea entertain at 
tea $.oi the iobn- 
omo'te and 3tean- 
men givta. ilteaa 
•tatteataai o£ tne 



it-ta ' Starr, at -to 



L-tub fc-tay. 



U Dt C Q oitcus in 
^oaa-ttt -va b-j-g 
aucoeaa tnanRa to 
rT'iidted ftu-te, 
managet. "-3n» 
Ct-imaon Cocpartut" 
goea soe-t't. 'Jta- 
tetntty n-tgiit, 
iw-ttfi txo n-ifiea. 



Ditanfeag-L^-tng ex- 
citement gVaduai- 
ty lueating o^. 
ilonday a-taeady 
toons g-taT-ming ty 
neat, one C-tb 
i fosa natuva-f 
iD-ttn a t eu - atudei 
eta mm ing tot ex-ain 



tf. any beobte toof» 
tine ''t?ie 0": a^ 
Get tne PIf 'pve- 
i>ioua". Uea-tnet 
btetty anabby- 



'iovtn-irantty ihe 
ten Liub bei'teota 
a nooe-t idea o£ 
"?aby Oigeta" 
3tyouta fot Saaet 
Heatt. 



biitood Omoa gii>e« 
tnita taiA o^ the 
aetiea on ll'itt4am 
i. Cacfiaon. 3itat 
^efleataai of. 
baget Weat-t. Pep 
meeting in 
St a d -Lu m . 



ffany leaue tot 
a o m e . -uch e £ - 
ci-terrent among 
toottat-t {.ana. 



Onanfeagiuing !Say. 
tte beet f U 28- J I 
%ait ia tne day ' o 
fieto. ?itt Sottet 
et banqueta tea 
and ooagnea. 
3toan ting Cuttet 
beti ail ntgn-t. 



f-eti) a-teeby men 
end i-emet meaty 
co-eda mandet 
a tound tne cam'pua 
Jitia' J-tee C-tub 
ftotda a&eeiat 
btac Ciee. 



ITany tetutning 
atudenta temind 
one ot ^ebtembet 
once mote. 



'I.'ny ia 1'onday? 
Onotfiet good ta-trr 
on rcotata b\j 
Pteiy. 



boot batt iaaue ot 
-tne 3iget cornea 
out. toaanetbai-t 
tr.en begin b*tac— 
tice. 



^onn ineno ainga 
in cna'pe-t, 3aye 
Citiey atata tn 
Wtama Ceaaue bto- 
duotion, 3fie Sm- 
pottance ©■-£. beino 
io tneat ".. 



216 



1321 



nrrrMRrp 



1Q01 



3ne 3-iA-ta-' jiee 
Ctufc puto on a 
fctunt i/n _cnafeet. 
TTinetua Otumnae 
entettain iotho- 
rnolc g-ttia at 
liatie Ciough'tv. 



•7 tn< 



ffie-a— u>a— tia 
^•ivt*' ^ie« 
©oncevt oi|.eting 
-t-a pte<ye-n.ted. 
Heien SJeH'oody'o 
Doice i^ tn-e 
feteaa-ant ^u-Vpt-tae 
ot- tne e*>-e-ning. 



Dfve Pni ^aii sa- 
tevtoinat -tneit 
annuai 9P3 n "oul« 
tSn^olma-v dance at 
Hidden Snn t>u tne 
fiec-Aeaded Ciuti. 



(t'iao Setyt 3,ti&- 
ouoid (-u-tniohea 
tne muaie. tot 
gof-^ee at feemia. 
Suen. tewet at 
enutcn. 



l\j C Q turtcneon vn 
temia. Hat^otie 
Cotiiet and (lack 
i'etn ta-tn -un cAafe 
e-t on 'Aot-td 3ei- 
ioui&Aip. 



;3uainea-s> meetina 
of iiAta y-tee 
Ctu&. itudent 
pommia-oion meeti, 
JtarvR tlianan un- 
atite to a-feean -In 
cfia'pei. 



3Ae Poet, UacAei 
Cind&au, tat&& i a 
c-Aape-t and to 
a few Sng-tiajj „ 
ciaoaea.. li J. U 
feic-tute £ot llug- 
ijet. Stamotie 
c-om m it-tee ir. eeta. 



3a-iAa tij 0>io» anH 
:a&Retl>a-ti mana>- 
get, fteitA #ttacA 
an. oteno-n e-tut 



3Ae }teefta Ao-£d 
f.ottn» fit 3uiton 
ot tfie Sit-at- Sa'p- 
t-t»t cAuVe-A. taiR* 
-in cAafeet. 



dpJBeayanee o-fi- fete 
vacation escatna 
meana rrueA uotR. 
Svetyone pvoeutea 
tiofoe-ta fot 3a-y 
'pa-i.nte'v t," ,,s '-*- 
-i,a Ifeo-t". 



'icat 



3 fie Wait gitta 
eattu out tneit 
annuat auatim ot 
ain^-twa. eatota. 
Candtetig-At »e1- 
uice &y tne fl'uai- 
ca{ u-tut>« Sagel 
Neavt feteaented. 



St.. 3uiton again 
a-peaft» o-n uetu 
inteteat-ing &ui>- 
i-ec-ta. '3ne 6at" 
ia tne pofeu'tav 
entet-tainment oi- 
tne eu-ening;. 



Jtanfe IDanam giuea 
tatft on the fitot 
tAvee pteaid.en-t a 
o-f- C.C. 3Ae Soatd 
o-f. tne I 6 meet 
to teuiae tne con 
atttution. 



fit-.. SiettiseA 
teada Aia oteAea- 
tta in "3ne 3o-y, 
iympAony ". ia'l— 
f-o-td and PatA 
ot-tqtnate a no»e{ 
etafping atunt. 



ITagria Pan Pan in 
' eVRin4. Oii ot- 
ga-ni-iation-a feut 
on a-tunto-. Ifanu 
heat ffia&e-t ^at- 
tiaon. 



Cnti&tmao efia'pei 
a-e"n>tfle< ^ivta 
aing eatota to 
f tatetnitiea- and 
otiiC).* in eat-tu 
motntng. "Ue aha't 
aptead the fru-ti" 
etc afefceata- on 
ftont o-f Poimet- 



meW-u Chtiii--Cma6 
and ha'c'p'u Heu; 
Ueat to ait. 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



25 



26 



27 



28 



29 



30 



31 



21T 



1Q99 



Xat-tha ^eitiL? and 
loxie !ac«wn ate 
aiad Co lie i>oct-. , 
tut the i/est o-p 
us — ? C-taaaet aa 
uauat. A 



Ft t. r.touon teada 
Che e ha 'pet aona 
aety-ice, wft-L-Ce th< 
Liacft lcnj» i>egin 
c-iapj-ing. afcaamo- 
aicatty aa-ain. 



- oacn r ivsoni 
Caika on 6-aa^eC— 
iait. He aduiae* 
ui noC to hiaa 
Che 1efCi.ee, 



■Jae Coach went on 
•aj-t-fcf fiia tiaafket- 
'jatt tutea- todau. 
Ke outtinea Che 
ne(i luiet ana ex- 
p-taina -Che change 
•Jiaet. appeata af- 
Cet u-aeo.tion. 



ituaent Lomaitaa- 
ion ainea and 
aancea at the 
GntieVa a-u U ac t i p- 
tion dance. 



teas. -.>;-„■ 

- U C F. S t . 



■-6 5 coucn ujeeaa 
ou J the L'aa,<etuai-i 
Ttn ana ae L.a Cne 
aquca aoj.n Co IS 
t'ne ; [ u'jenC, 
i Vi£n;j r. v fi iuna 
'j: a n C a out ir. o n s u • 



line Jt^ev p-tin-tfc 
Che tiat op aan- 
atao,-Cea pet a-- 
jVe-:i, nejutat 
^-•Cuoen't CQ-iFxiaaio 
.r. e e C 1, n cj . 



W u 'J aw-t. mm-una 
iieeC aC Che £toaa 
moot ptuno-e. f-tias 
xinneta: Ueta ifae 
JvCe,, tl'axine Pooie 1 ! 
^etia DVomti, ana 
Cauetta Jeu-eti-auah. 



Qu-niota etect 
3 -I* an ft Parian iraji 
aget o£ £.atce. 
2uat-te't Ceachea 
ua aome new aonaa 



Jitta' ^loma-Ue 
C'tuu en Cettaina 
"tama Ceaa-ue in 
:r.evi'.vis, ctudenC 
ditectoty out. 



:'.' G iiike^ up. Hi C. 
CuCiet. Pni uair.a, 
G-tpha (iua, ftapfca 
iiaa, and Pn-i. 
A'eita enCettain. 



1. vetli sr.-i/fl/- 
•yn at a I'o-Cn et 
:. '' i a l e v tec. 
e : i-aacA f'ae.%ao 
-tocij.etC, -Jay-tot, 
a J J. c ,; e t a el > e . 



t. 



;se L 



Co Che ' Cuci en C 
ioaij. G.i-atrr, alocA 
peaiio-ai. e te-iu 
c-:atog.|^ei, 
science ctuiS mee-ta 



iinat' exam aehea 
uie pg-aCea. '.'.'e 
uea l Cticpte Cl.ee;? 



-J t e a h w a n 3 oui n i 
^'-ytia e n tevtain in 
■JigfinoV atudy. 
Ru-Ch 'Aiiiiamaon 
ana Ei9.-3.ie Knox 
Cone Che jatia-e £ot 
dancing . 



Caat minute 
Cnemea and chaVta 
freing. l-iniahed in 
teaetia-n haa-te. 
Umoa afc-pointed to 
manage itao ii-ati. 



Katty hi it. met, in- 
tetna-Cionai II ffi 
C man, ta-tfe* in 
cna'pei. J.ood fiu- 
mot aa- a)eii aa 
^ood iine. 



f-'iaatmament Con— 
teVenee in Semia. 
t'otia ii'aumea and 
euoma Cei,no lake 
ieadina paVC-a. 



3ut iaat got oC 
; tace ^in - ^ Cne 

:■ r. ■> t 2 u o ^ o ti i e C 
o u t a or. i i> u t n i n ; 
t i. idnia fit oi I ^. 



ixama- l>eqin 
e a t n e a C n o jj • 



'ne day oitet, and 
• hia neii) o^dea-t 
.ea trifiin; • 



t^euj op the ^-teah 
men -(.iniah and go 
home. 



flo cna-^e-t ia the 
on-iu vedeeming 
t^eatut^ o^ exam 



ffioat ^eopie ate 
aiteadu teciatet- 
ed toA next ae- 
meatet. 'J)e 
wai-Lop i'. U. 



Ohia ia the end! 
'Inat to do uiitn 
•the tuio temain- 
incj dav'a 6e(-oVe 
aecond aemea'tet. 
i).e (ieat Gijtjiea 
S l-l I. 



a ii-eaaei acj o 
teat. n -U v a t - '* 
heatCteaa -toLa 
;ti>£ aia-. :;n.i.en C 1 
^ot next aer. - , eaCct. 
full 'j. h en t r ;-e te •- 
„i;-e acting., vt 
Cutna coua ana 



;i>etuthing no-tmai 
o^ain. v« ne» 
tacea wetcome ua. 
iaeutty attenda 
chatei en n.aaae 
L>i! xequeat. 
l-'texy Ca^fia on te- 
quited auajecta. 



Chattea Kimlia-tt 
•tatfta in chapei 
on Vattr.et Kati. 
Jtuouta pot Cne 
bet^ual-y 'ptau op 
i-itia' liitama'tic 
Ctuu. fecvence 
etuli meet a. 



218 



1<*22 



FTRRIIARY 



<f €\ 



Pl-o-f..- fiauiea 
a-'peafta -to U It C Q 
Qi-pfta Xa-'opa Pai 
e-tecta. Re-heal-aai 
o-f- "3fte £tau-e 
with 3ujo 3oo6»", 



Itli-a-a Oauia 
eftoo-aea danceVa 
1-oA- Cotoniai 9aii 
minuet. Itieetinq 
of. £sceeutii>e 
Coal-d o-f- etudent 
Commia-aion. 



Sigeta defeat P-'yo 
minq -tn. <>aa-ftet- 
<>ait 43-1 I at £at- 
amie. (luniota 
ftoid tac&y patty 
in ion Cuia dttfioo'. 



3iqeta &eat Qqqie< 
8 1-24 at 3oVt Co-l. 
-tin*. ftle.-n.4y ' Jiee 
C-tut ftome conceit 



ftv*-. (lamea U. C 
£mitft pWutdea 
muaic tot coffee 



fi 



6«4 



Sig pep mee-ting 
teoauae o-f iiooseC 
ta-tt u-ictol-iea. 
Soottatt awea-feta 
awarded. 



jit-ta nai>6 cnapei 
petiod -In Pit -to 
tati-fy neii it Q 
cona-C-ttution t ■ 
3vyouta fot 4"n— 
io-t fatce. 



J>V. 3uiton o-f tfte 
Sa-ptiat Chutcn 
and eu-angeiiat 
£. &. ^tucket ftao-e 
cftoice ot cftafcei. 
student Commia- 
aion meeta. 



->in,ia' (Tando-t-tn 
eiut and Pl-of. 
Huffrett 'petfol-m 
-to adoevtiae a 
Da-ten-tine g-itney 
dance. 



3iqeta defeat 
tf.inea 82-23 ftete. 
sen.- dftaft-otft 
ta-tfta on -tne u-ai- 
ue of money. jit- 
ney dance « 
ttlCytl.eao'i- gym.' ^ so 
gnd , tti^gut* f-oi 

(l.n.n.ifv'1. f.nVi.f.A. 



ftlinea defeat 3i- 
qeta 31-28 at .Jot 
den. Contempotal-y 
entevtaina ttinevv 
and Mypatia at a 
Datentine dance. 



WaVviet Suma-Cead 
enteVCaina Ky pa- 
t-La at a Da-tent-in 
frtearaf aa-t. 



&1-. Jfiuniu>ay tatfea 
on Gt-iaftam Cin— 
eo-in -In cfta'pet, 
PaVt o-f flugge-t 
goea to -pt-vnteW' 



Betnal-d Ueaaey 
ainga in cfta'pet. 
student Commia- 
aion meeta. 



fteu-. Siodget-t of 
Jtace cftutcft aota 
-In cfta'pet.- (fin- 
el-ua entettaina 
Btea-ftman gi-via. 



Sig pet llleeting. 
Hil/.- Kon.-te*i,, jeoVq 
C-t-t^j-ea-t-Vom, Ked 
Gmoa, and Sot 
fticiiimine tatft. 
(tlinetua ftotda aeo 
ond 3teaftmen tea. 



C.C defeat* Sou-t 
1. del- 8b-33 in ex- 
ovt-Lno qame neve. 
i-l'^-t<^ , i'l/imat-lc 
Ctu-fr fc'teAent* 
"3ne iiaue id it ft 
3»o Sacea" 



"jtesU" entel/tain 
tne •fai'v one* at 
eta&o-Vate -totmato. 
Houa-e^jal-tieti to 
Cascade. 



not the u-^uat 
quiet £unda-y due 
to "t^a-UeVnit-y 
tni tia-tion*-. . 



(Pi/, iatqent tatfea 
on -tfte tiooaiiiit- 
-v-Pieft- o-f tfte otag 
"(fetety 1'al->* Qnn" 
and "3ne Snty 
Jiti ate cafct. 



Siq Oit-Cotieqe 
iance in feemia, 

Unuauat iucce^>, 
(Jimmie Qmo*-lf ana- 
qet. 



ll.'aaftinqton ' 4 
iiivtftday. Clt-i- 
Jotteqe |e>icnic in 
-/atden o-f Joa6~- 
tf.at lllaafiouqat, ' 
monaael.- fiance at 
ean Cui* fry Qoftn 
dacriOon and Setas 



phi Seta ftapfca in- 
itiateo iBatu Cieq' 
Qiuerv, iuoma Leino, 
fiouiena HamJDO-'fti'i-e, 
Q-tiue Haun, Col-en 
Setqel., Q-tfre^t 
Cytesk, Ruth fttat^-, 
and (Jamea. Patft, \\, 



PW-. HuUeVt 
tatfeo on "Itaaft- 
inqto-n, tfte ft an" 
3fte ua-ua-t Qnttet 
danoe. 



C.C. t 
H3- lb 
fratt ft 
Hupa-ti 
tem'pol- 
aei>ent 



eata J.uominq 

n fraa-ltet- 
eic, ItlineWc 
a and Con— 
aty -ptedge 
een qiA-ta. 



UlaT-y St-ye jol-o 
gide-a mu«.ic -f-ol- 
Eemifi eoi-|-ee. 
tft. Cvtftut Savt- 
-tett enteVtaino 
83fte Ontu Jitt" 
caat at -tea. 



Pteoident^l-.. Ket 
tv &{■ fteqia oot- 
-teqe, i'enu-e'v, and 
President Hedet-t 
o-f S'tu'i-'y co-tteqe 
in tfte flqat-fia 
-tatft. ttiyo^iia ex- 
ptained. 



fiv. Jitmol-e tatfta 
afrou-t nay teu-el-.- 
Pfti fietta teat 
Setaa and Pi iKa-pa 
•teat Sat-fra in 
|-il.-a-t intel— -ttat 
-i-ndool- taae-tatt. 



219 



1Q9? 



fil.»- ilu.nv»ay totfc* 
afrou-t 4' vo< i*'to-n«» / 
i-t^ma Cnt-o &e«t 
(iljth* IW&,' and 
Pfc-v 4a»* Wot Kap 

a-anve^-. - 



feto )»»(» me-etvno. ■ 
j^eeo&e-o 4-u Batt, 
Bvioa/o-, - § Ulavo-*, 
Hac-ivenVve »»^ 
ioo-fe*»». ' Sa-oe-vo 
totfeo to- aVC ♦tit- 
dent*.' fct*«*»« 
otumiva-e t-e-o.' 



C.C fceato Sout- 
deV H2-.26 on Bo-a-t 

Btuina Ve^Veo-eivt— 
kf **♦ Co-noVeaa- 
ttonot «&ttV©& 

tot4* o* »t**t*no 



CU. a«to vne ~ 
ooo4ettatt onam— 

)j-t/OnOnt|^ &V i>eat— 

tno i.U.^1- 16. 



Seam,. tnvee ou-fro, 
Cooan, nvanooel., 
oad t*ov*M. i"ea»e 
-j^oA. ftaao^to Cvt-y 
|Vi Q.Q.U. toVt- 
imnteivt.' (itvfco 1 
jt ee Cta-fr at 
EaVrv-o.- 



feto (javade tl*H/u 
ft-O^tneOO oectvon. 
3-^eta Cit|jna Pnt 
-vntttateo and 
otoeo dtivrv-eV and 
tfueoteA. l^avCn at 
"Ave- iv©'. 



j| ndtaaa |>*t to 
teato C.C. H5-42.- 
j&tadent Co-*nftt»~ 
aton »«et-fr. ' fyonn 
iluntwoy t4tfto tn 
«^wa|>e-v on Co^-ottt 
UaU.< 



m,v. - Co-»dvU>n,- 

U-vc-e— fc-Vea-ta-ent ot 
c-tVafjet. 



tn ntot»A-o £o-V 
V-etnVnte-o t«a». 
Pet» ne-&t-wv» vtv 
Pevfri** <i^t©v»avd 
&4»ee-e4««. and ^tv« 
••vfe*^.- 



3to«4, d«&«t*Vo 
fta&o*,- Aluntuxj-y, 
6otv4»« r ' ID^nd-e-t&tn 
and ICtntatt and 
&4«V^ovd to-»« to 
fl.U. and Snate*.' 



ID.fi.ti. ntW to 
int.- Cu-tteA-.- ft-td- 
oe««otel. oA-odeo 
ao vtv. ■ 

11 



Rotevt Wo-mavd 
Covd,- Ma-vu-oA-d ex~ 
enanae JDAro^e^a-oA-, - 
tatfto to- student* 
a&out SKinoot da-y-6- 
tn Utenna, - BeA^tvn 
and foo-oeoio. 



Da.. 1 Hto-£ofc> av»64 
fc-eeorvd o-t fivo 
«-eA"t.-e-&- o£ ta^fto.- 
ilvoiaa »-fia-»o 
oA-eote-ot trv C. C. i 
at (ave-oe-nt..- 



&to t4tvd and iao- 
tat&.- M^atta -an 
nW«Vfi<vVy dt»n*v. 

M^t2t*CttX danee 
vn Aon C»t*-. ■ 



Kittfi WeaerveA. ©n— 

t&vtatno Co-ntem)» 
aA-aVy at dinneA.. 



Aarvday v* once 
^-Vo-)»©vty <tutet 
aad >eve-ww 



fll..- Mv«to-b o-|i 
3tvat dletno-dv*t 
oliuA-an ta^.fc* tn 
aft^it»e^.- fll-aiaatto 
frtoVtt- tea «uttn 
fll-V.- ©avttett.- 



ftuaaet eotv^otan 
*tc-€-on»* -6-^ K«»tt4 
Cntalj,- 6ot &eAt- 
oatn*, 3v»ne*o 
auc^eV,' and 3vann 
Blonan. ■ 



"3ne CtvUveae Can. 
te-vn." (ju-tvtto V 6 ' 1 - 
^cvmance.- 



3»o- AeA^ervade*- 
•Cveat tn« d^Vuvo 
-to- lave »u-frt«..- 



fiA..- j&tetnov tatfeo 
tn ana^iet arvd 
atoeo o)>en tec— 
tu-Ve tn .aji'vevivoon 



tett,- C.C. ovad, 
ta-tfett' o^ ee^ev- 
teneeo- vn l(oA.ea 
and C4tna. 



ill/.' Jo-aAt,- o-t 
Urvtu-eV^tvy o-f- 

c-fia'pe^.- 



student eo-nv»t*— 
^i-on da^ trv ena^- 
et.- 6e-au«.ou^> an— - 
no-u-nce««nt*. - 



QvVt*' fi'uaiMittc 
Cta4 ]»Veo«nt& 
tuna-ti^n j»toy, 
"34e Clvvnooe Can- 
teVn",- AtaWlng 
ftouoena Mam^»o^vuV« 
and QeVtA-ade 
Ane-vli..- 



El..' B-to-doett o-i- 
^Vace e-KuA'Cn 
otueo t^e ifiA^fK 
&$, a *evle& ot 
teot-uA.eo. 



itlv. iJeu-i,ne Wfi» 
on dvtu-e-o to 4>e 
O'tavted aoon. ■ 



I'll v.- idto-dae-t-t 
aga-ln.' vlurvto-l' 
SaVoe (jjVo.iiia.ed 
f.oA GjiVvt 1^' 



U da-y of. 1.eot 
and )»eaoe.' 



Ultrve'v-u.a attminae 
ervte1.tatn ofitvoei 
"C" Ctu-fr ux»Vfeo on 
maoteat co^aedy..- 



WeaVtteoo Ib'vo^o 
a-Ut-e eatauio. 
oate-vjje t<>vmat. 
Illtne-Voa, • &y)»atta, 
and Co-nte«poVaVv 
meettnao, ■ 



220 



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We arc indeed grateful for the loyal support that we have received 
from the merchants, business men and firms of this city. It is only 
thru the medium of their advertising that it is possible to publish the 
1923 issue of The Pikes Peak Nugget. They support us; let us 
in turn support them. 



H E 



E H 



m- : 



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Established 


Our Idea of Service 




18 8 5 


Is embraced in procuring merchandise 
of superb quality and distinctive style 
approved by the most careful buyers, 
and offering it at prices consistently 






moderate — concentrating our efforts 


Satis 




upon giving the utmost in value every 


i 




day of the year. 





or your 
money back 



Featuring exclusively 
in Colorado Springs 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

Munsing Underwear 

Holeproof Hosiery 

Ralston Shoes 

Emery Shirts 

Berg Hats 




Tejon and Colorado Ave. 



H 5 



222 



'II 



H-: 



The Hemenway Grocery 
Company 

1 3 and 1 1 5 S. Tejon St. 1 201 North Weber St. 

W h I e s ale and R e t a i I 

CASH AND CREDIT 
DELIVERY SERVICE 



Sole Agents for BATAVIA BRAND FOODS 



ENOUGH SAID 



PROMPT EFFICIENCY is what AMBULANCE 
SERVICE Demands. That is the WHY of 

Laws Super-Service 

EVER-READY 
AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



=♦♦= 



THE D. F. LAW CO. 



Main 166 



116 N. Nevada Ave. 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



m 



Collegiate Sport Togs 



Misses' Sport Togs of every de- 
scription to meet the call of the great 
outdoors — the mountain trails, open- 
links and bridle paths. 




1 






c 



Exclusive Novelties in Footwear 



AND HOSIERY 




,11 



Always at 
Vorhes — You 

will find 

the styles that 

are new and 

different. 

Styles preferred 

by our friends 

at C. C. 



VORHES (Shoes that Satisfy) 22 S. Tejon St. 



224 



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225 



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ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



The 




NTLERS 

Colorado Springs' Largest 
and Best Hostelry 



CHAS. A. SCHLOTTER 
Manager 



RESTAURANT FAMED 



We Specialize in Parties and 
Banquets of any size 



BILLIARDS 



CIGARS 



MEET ME at BAUM'S 



114 EAST PIKES PEAK AVE. COLORADO SPRINGS 



Headquarters for Colorado College Students 



SODA 



CANDY 



m 



m 



RUDOLPH HEYSE 

TOOLS and CUTLERY 

HARDWARE 



Telephone Main 552 

28 North Tejon Street 



The Seldomridge Grain Co. 

FLOUR, FEED, GRAIN, HAY 
POULTRY SUPPLIES and SEEDS 



Telephone Main 1 ; 



108 South Tejon Street 




Hibbard & 
Company 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

17 and iq South Tejon 

22 6 



z -m 




227 



11. 



YOU ARE 

SURE OF SERVICE 



IF INSURED WITH 



The Chas. T. Fertig 

Insurance and Investment 

Company 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



Phone 2600 



109 E. Kiowa 



OUR UP-TO-DATE PLANT 




produces perfect work on 
your linens, and we are 
willing that you should be 
the judge of this fact. 
Place an order with us this 
week and the finished 
clothes will be delivered to 
you promptly. Compare 
our washing and ironing 
with others and note the 
big improvement. 



The Pearl Laundry 

The Laundry that uses Ivory Soap 



X X 

329-331 N. Tejon St. 
Phones M. 1085-1086 



® E 





«wBe The Most 

iAttractive Girl In 
Colorado College 



If you would be among 
the better dressed girls of your school 
you will need to shop where the ulti- 
mate in style and quality are to be 
had. 

There is pleasure in buying at a 
store such as this, where everything 
for the complete outfitting of the Col- 
lege girl is to be had. 

Ask your friend where she shops. 



Giddings & Kirkwood 



228 




229 



■; 



Q UALITY ICE CREAM 

^^- When you are entertaining, you spare no pains in making 

sure that every detail is just right. When you order 
Barthel's Quality Ice Cream there's no doubt about its 



goodness. 

Candy for 

Eve> v Occasion 



BARTHEL'S 



131 North Tejon 



Service from Head to Foot 

Cleaning, Pressing, 

Dyeing 

Hat Blocking 

Shoe Repairing 




9 pfror> e 



TheJ. C.St. John '"- u h m e b Xng1 



OMPANY 



Incorporated 



We invite you to ask for estimates on any Plumbing or Heating 
Work you may have, from the largest to the smallest job. 



226 North Tejon Street. 



Phone, Main 48 



R. H. JOHNSON 



PAINTS, GLASS, WALL PAPER 

PHONE 717 W 2 14,i 2 N. TEJON 



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A RING TO BE PROUD OF 

We specialize in Re-Mount Work. 

Discarded Rings can be Re-Mounted into an exquisite ornament. 

The price is very small compared to the Beauty 

of Achievement. 

M. K. MYERS 

25 S. TEJON ST. 



THE DENT AN PRINTING COMPANY 

23 West Colorado Avenue, Colorado Springs 

Printers ink has developed this region 



THE ELIZABETH INN - 106*2 East Pikes Peak (Up-Stairs) 

LUNCHEON and DINNER a la Carte 

The Best of Home Cooked Food — Splendid Service 



The CRAFTWOOD SHOP 

BURNS THEATRE BUILDING 
GIFTS FOR EVERY OCCASION 



Otis & Co. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

~~X X x~~ 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



230 



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231 



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CHAS. P. BENNETT 



H. N. SHELLENBERGER 



The Bennett-Shellenberger 
Realty Company 



Real Estate 

Insurance and Loans 



2 East Pikes Peak 
Avenue 



Decker & Son Undertaking Co. 

= 317 N. Tejon Street = 

m.j. Decker Funeral Directors d.e. Deck* 



Private Ambulance 

Service Day or Night 



Phone 413 

5228-J 



Turner Art Shop 

CHAS. W. PITMAN, Proprietor 



FINE FRAMING 
and PICTURES 



126 NORTH 
TEJON ST. 



S. M. DUNCAN 



Painter and 
Decorator 



15 East Bijou St. 



Phone M. 1732 



Colorado Springs 



w 



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i 



F You Want a Box of 



CHOCOLATES 

' ' Good as JXCade 



Go to Wallace Candy Co. 

Princess Theatre 



THE MODERN SHOE SHOP 



Phone 



Main 1276-W \K|q. 



WHiX 
YOU 
I WAIT 



Photic 
Main 1276- 



QUICK and FIRST-CLASS WORK at MODERATE PRICES 



OVERLAND 

Billards and Bowling Parlors 
10 Tables and 4 Alleys 



S and 10 North Nevada Avenue 



C. F. ARCULARIUS 

Jeweler 

Everything a college student desires in the way of Jewelry 
9 South Tejon Street, Colorado Springs 



232 



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233 



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Be Ready for Any 
**== Emergency ^== 

Have a flashlight when you 
need it, in the side pocket or 
tool box of your car— a flash- 
light is always ready for an 
emergency. Carry one with 
yon and have it when you 
need it. Be sure it is a 

WINCHESTER 



The Lowell- Meservey Hardware Co. 

Phone 307 106 South Tejon Street Phone 327 



THE CLIFF HOUSE, 

MANITOU 

I mmedaitelx adjacent to the celebrated "Manitou" Soda Springs 
' and new $400,000 Bath House 

E. E. NICHOLS HOTEL CO., Proprietors 



"WHEN IT IS PROMISED' 



Telephone MAIN 536 

The Prompt Printery Company 

12 and 14 East Kiowa Street 



D. S. Gilmore, President 

E. J. Roesch, Secretary 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



M 



THE MONUMENT VALLEY 
FEED & FUEL CO. 

GOOD COAL 2 .N.Teio„S, 

And PROMPT DELIVERY Phone M. 496 



The Pikes Peak Book and 
Stationery Co. 

BOOKS, STATIONERY 

OFFICE SUPPLIES, BLANK BOOKS 

and TOURIST GOODS 



15 NORTH TEJON STREET 



COME UP WHERE PRICES ARE DOWN FOR BETTER SHOES 
AND HOSIERY - 

SUITS and TOPCOATS 

MADE TO INDIVIDUAL MEASURE 

$20.00 and Up 



Cunningham Shoe Co 



114 E. Pikes Peak 

(Upstairs) 



234 



II 







235 



H= 



Open Sundays, Holidays and Evenings 



jiccommodation Shop 

CHOCOLATES I, \\f COX CHOCOLATES 
Fancy Fruits, Groceries and Picnic Goods 



30*2 North Tejon St. Phone Main 592 Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Frank Cotten, President 



Frank Cotten, Jr., Secretary 



The Sun Realty Company 

REAL ESTATE, LOANS 
INSURANCE, RENTALS 



Phone Main 209 



23J-2 North Tejon Street 



USE MORE 



Milk 



Why 



Because It is the Best Balanced Food and 
Contains the Necessary Vitamines 



The Sinton Dairy 
Company 



II s 



M 




HIKING 

TENNIS 

ATHLETICS 

BATHING 




Outdoor Life 

MAKES LIFE 
WORTH LIVING 



We can supply all your needs 

THE OUT WEST 
TENT & AWNING CO. 

"THE SPORT SHOP" 

F. E. KOHLER, Manager 
B. D. FLETCHER, Sportsman 

M. 1261... 113 N. Tejon 




CAMPING 

MOTORING 

HUNTING 

FISHING 




KLEEN MAID BREAD 

"THE PERFECT LOAF" 

g^i^A^ Buy It from Your Grocer 

ft Gomes to You Fresh, Clean and Delicious 



The Ideal Bakery 



Office Phone 13 

BARNES & MARDEN 

PLUMBING and HEATING 

Dunham Healing Service 

206 N. Tejon Street COLORADO SPRINGS 



236 



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237 



Ml 



The Emery Studio 

HIGH -CLASS PHOTOGRAPHY 



Phone M. 41 W 



Special attention to 

Students' Pictures 



Ground Floor, Cor. Cascade Ave. 
and Kiowa St. 



The Popular Place for Good Things to Eat 



WOOD'S 



18 North Tejon 

Main 491 I he Wood Drug Company 



LIGHTNING SHOE SHOP 

We Repair Shoes by the Goodyear Welt Repairing System 
Our Work Guaranteed 



.Sliine for Every Pair Soles. 



l^Yi N. Tejon Street 



BEST SHOE SHINE IN CITY 



National Shoe Shining Parlor 

104 E. PIKES PEAK 



HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 



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Invest Your Savings 

FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS 

7% 

Payable Semi- Annually, in Amounts of' $250 up 



7 N. Tejon St. 



The Colorado Investment 
and Realty Co. 



PHONES MAIN 2" AND MAIN IT 3 



CLEANING TAILORING PRESSING 

TOM HOWLAND 

"Our business is making new clothes and taking care 
of old ones right" 



Phone us and we will have our 
wagon call 



204 N. Tejon St. 
Phone 1209 



.9 T A N D I E V - PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 North Tejon Street 

Hand Coloring and Enlarging :: Kodak Work 

Camera Art Pictures of the Pikes Peak Region 
Colored, Sepia, or Black and White :: Framed and Unframed :: All Prices 



238 



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239 



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IP 



Bissells Pharmacy 



FOR 



PURE DRUGS 
STATIONERY 
CANDY, SODA 
AND CIGARS 



Corner Dale and Weber 



Phone Main 980 



GRIM WOOD'S 



24 N. Tejon Street 



Books, Art, Stationery 



The Shields- Metzler Grocery Company 



Wholesale Grocers 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Robinson-Hunt Grain Company 



liolesale and Retail 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Heclrick Wall Paper and Paint Company 

Phone Main 886 21 East Kiowa Street 

PICTURE FRAMING 



We Specialize in 

Imported and Domestic 
Groceries 



Knorr's Market Company 

Service and Quality 

Telephones Main 2602. and 2603 
123 North Tejon Street 



The United One Cent to 
One Dollar Stores Co. 



INC. 



Carries at all times a full line of outing supplies, 

souvenirs, post cards, and facilities are extended 

to tourists and others to check their packages, 

mail letters, use the telephone, etc. 

We sell nothing over one dollar, and our huge stock includes candy, 
stationery, toilet goods, dry goods, ribbons, millinery, groceries, etc. 

Remember WE SELL NOTHING OVER ONE DOLLAR 

United One Cent to One Dollar Store 

23 S. TEJON ST., COLORADO SPRINGS 



240 



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241 



11: 



PAINT 

Retail A LITTLE CHEAPER Wholesale 

A LITTLE BETTER 



Paint Supply Company 

113-115 EAST BIJOU 



EAT 

Meals that are tastily prepared to please the most particular and 
dainty appetites 

AT 

The most fully equipped and up-to-date Cafeteria in the Middle West 

JONES 

Stands for cleanliness, quality and strictly home prepared food, and there 
is no better service than 

CAFETERIA 

Service, where you can see before you order, and you only pay for what 
your appetite desires of our endless variety of appetizing food 



Breakfast Hours, 6:30 to 9:45 
Dinner, 11:30 to 2:30 
Supper, 5:00 to 7:30 



Jones Cafeteria, 19 East Kiow, 



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" GOOD COAL QUTCK " 

The Colorado Springs Fuel Company 

H. C. HARMON, President 



Plume Main 230 



120 East Pikes Peak Avenue 



The Pikes Peak Warehousing Company 
Fireproof Storage Warehouse 

E. G. MAY, General Manager 
Phone Main 160 

"GOOD SERVICE PAYS" 



Our Repair Work is our Best 
Advertisement 



We do Strictly High-Class 
Shoe Repairing 



MEN'S, LADIES", BOYS' AND 
CHILDREN'S 

Work and Dress Shoes 



I carry a complete line of Men's and Boys' Work and Dress 
Shoes at reasonable prices. I solicit your patronage 
in these Shoes, knowing that they will give 
you perfect satisfaction. 

LHAo. 1 . JViALjE^II Colorado Springs, Colo. 



242 



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2 43 



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"This Year's Nugget" 

Only a reminder that an "OLD GRAD" is always glad to talk 
C.C. as well as "STOCK IN TRADE" 



BICYCLES GYM CLOTHES ATHLETIC TOGS 

All Good Kinds The Best Just Rite 

"It's-in-the-Name" 

W. I. Lucas Sporting Goods 
Company 

Phone Main 900 119 North Tejon Street 



Broken Lenses Duplicated 

C. B. LAUTERMAN 

JEWELER, OPTOMETRIST and MANUFACTURING OPTICIAN 
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



121 North Tejon Street 



Phone Main 569 



The Place for Exclusive People 

Campbell's Sanitary Barber Shop 

JOHN C. CAMPBELL, Proprietor 
12 South Tejon Street. Phone, Main 490 

Electric Hair Dryer. Appointments made for Outside Work. 



m 



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Wiring, Fixtures 
Repairing 



All Kinds of Electrical 
Supplies 



Whitney Electric Co 

WIRELESS SUPPLIES 

W 



208 North Tejon Street 



Phone Main 906 



ARMY AND NAVY GOODS 

Don't Forget to see us for Your HIKING and OUTING Clothing 
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF 

RIDING BREECHES PUTTEES 

BOOTS 



NORFOLK SUITS 

For Men and Ladies 

CORDOVAN SHOES 



GOLF HOSE 



Also a Complete Line of Camp Supplies 
and A uto Tents. 

THE ARMY & NAVY STORE 



O. L. GILBERT; Proprietor 
Phone, Main 2 17- J 
106 E. Pikes Peak Avenne 



COLORADO SPRINGS 



244 



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245 



H:- 



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Hazlehurst, Cogsdill & Flannigan. 

1 neorporated 

Specialists in High Grade 
INVESTMENT 
SECURITIES 



?|? 



Suite 510 Exchange National Bank Building 
Main 44 



Manufacture to Order, Finish and Repair all Kinds of Furniture 

LIEBERMAN & KAPSCH 

A. LIEBERMAN M. KAPSCH 

UPHOLSTERY and CABINET WORK 

Telephone Main 1153-W. 322-324 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs 



GIBSON INSTRUMENTS 

HILTBRAND MUSIC CO. 

The Best Assortment of Sheet Music 
in the City 



Phone Main 913 



125 ] 2 North Tejon St. 



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This modern laundry 
is a clothes saver 



Time and again it has been proven that 

Elite laundering methods really prolong 

the life of a garment. You can prove 

it yourself. 



A 
▼ 



DRY CLEANING in OUR OWN 

PLANT 

Clothes which we dry clean in our sepa- 
rate dry cleaning plant may be worn 
within a few hours after you get them. 
There's no clinging odor. 



\£c^ Laundry 

I 1 7 North Tejon Street 



Main 82 or 86 



246 



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nmii'—^ii^wi ■!« 



THE SPOT LIGHT 

.-■-=== .-= "BEWARE OF US"^ — =. 

WE KNOW NO SEX, RELIGION, ORGANIZATION, POLITICS OR CREED 



Volume 1 



NOVEMBER 1, 1921 



Number 1 



How About It? 

A very regretable thing happened last Sat- 
urday afternoon between halves of the Ag- 
:;.es-T igers game, when a certain former stu- 
dent of Colorado Ccllege by the name of 
Kail Cooley. lieutenant-gi \ernor c£ the Stale 
of Colorado, came into the dressing room of 
the Tiger squad at the most critical time of 
the conflict, just after the Aggies had scored 
,i touchdown due to hard luck and uneven 
breaks for the Tigers, and. proceeded so it is 
alleged, to give them one awful bawling out 
Idling them that they were yellow and that 
il la- couldn't play football better than they 
did lie would quit, and that he had a twelve 
year old daughter who could play football a 
lot better than the Tigers. This was at a 
critical time, the Tigers were crippled from 
the game with Utah, and were fighting a 
heavy, stronger team who were , at their 
strongest offense and defense since the open-_ 
ing of the football season. What th( y needed 
was encouragement, to go back out on the 
field in the last half and beat the Aggies 
As it was they went back out on the field 



THE 

REASON 

WHY 

With this issue the Spot Light makes 
its first appea:ance on the campus of Col- 
orado College. The editors of the Spot 
Light expect to portray the life of the 
students, alumni, faculty and administra- 
tion of thi> Colorado College exactly and 
, ceurately as it happens both in College life 
and outside. 

11 shall be the policy of the Spot Light to 
know no sex. religion, organization politics, 
oi' creed. Regal dless of your influence or who 
you aie or your position in college or what 
you do you will be subject to the criticism or 
praise of the Spot f.ight, as the case may lie. 
1 he Spot Light shall be absolutely impartial 
in its dealing with all those who tall under 
our lays This is just a word of warning. 



College Spirit 

Alice Sweet. Frances Tucker Mai Graham. 
and Mai MacDougal should be congratulated 
on the way the college dance was handled. 
It was a wonderful affair from the standpoint 
of a crowd, but that's all we could say for 
it. How; many girls stood along the walls 
all evening with not even one dance. Hi iv 
many boys stood in the doorway eyeing tin- 
girls and wishing an introduction! There 
was no attempt made at acquaintance; 
those who were on the committee were 
so engrossed in tripping the light fantastic 
that they cared little about the good time th ■ 
others were not having. As an all-College 
function, the "all" should.be stricken off. It 
was a poor social affair, and not represent- 
ative of the college spirit, but of little groups 
and cliques who held themselves apart from 
others.. It was a farce. Let us hope that the 
next all-College dance will be more of a 
success. 



A little over three hours was all the men' 



247 



■= 



Over 



700,000 



owners 



DODGE BROTHERS 

MOTOR CAR 



The Marksheffel Motor Co. 

22 North Cascade Avenue 



JOHNSTON & MURPHY'S 




HERE ONLY 
in Colorado Springs 



< Box 




aasaaaaaa 



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CADI LLAC 



1 he whole world testifies to- 
day that the Cadillac realizes 
to the full, the high criterion 
of absolute reliability which 
induces in your mind com- 
plete confidence, complete rest, 
complete satisfaction, every 
mile you travel in the Cadillac. 

THE ADAMS MOTOR CO. 

Marksheffel 
Building 

248 



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®; 



BRUIN INN North Cheyenne Canon 



m 



Good Food 

Good Service 

Good Dance 
Floor 

Good Moonlight 





Just Phone 
"Bruin Inn" 

and tell 

Lee Swanson 

how many 




Good Time Parties 



m 



249 



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The Store of the Hour 

U p-to-Datc and Wide- Awake — A Store for the People 



WE specialize at all times in popular quality merchandise. 
Our connection is such as to assure us special concessions 
and at times unusual bargains. We fully believe in co-opera- 
tion, and do not hesitate to cut prices in. as well as out of season. 
It gives us an edge on the otherfellows hard to overcome and bound 
to result in better values. If we didn't feel we were in a position 
to serve you better we would hesitate to ask your patronage. We 
not only want it this once but at all times. To get it we must 
attract your attention — to hold it we must be right. <J If you want 
Dry Goods, Garments, Millinery, Men's Furnishings and Shoes, 
and a dividend with every purchase, go to 

THORSEN'S • • ■ ■ Court House Corner 



p. s. 



'We sell for cash, which is another reason why we sell for less" 



Specialists in Young Men's Tailoring 



Young men especially like our tail- 
oring, because Ed. V. Price & Co. 
know how to put that n snap n into 
clothes that young fellows like. 

"(\ists no mure than Ready-Maries" 



1 13 Hast Pikes Peak Ave. 



The Colorado Electric Company 

All Kinds of Electric Appliances 

WIRING ::: FIXTURES ::: REPAIRING 
Telephone Main 1034 12 East Bijou Street 



M 



President, F. HENRY MILLER 
C. J. STAFFORD, Vice-Pres. A. M. KORSMEYER, Vice-Pres. 

N. B. ALLEN. Secy. MERRILL M. WILSON, Treas. 

THE KENT 
REALTY CO. 



Established 1871 



• 



with the Town 



Colorado Springs' Leading Realtor 

Burns Building Phone Main 350 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



250 



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251 



II: 



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ONE OF THE HIGHEST ARTS AMERICA HAS PRODUCED 

HJan Prtggle lottery 

VISITORS WELCOME 

Catalogue on Request 

Van Briggle Tile & Pottery Company 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



Fine Kodaks and Graflex Cameras 

WITH SPECIAL LENSES for SPEED and DETAIL 
These are especially valuable in taking Football — Action — and Athletic 
Field Stunts. We also carry every grade and style of Kodak from the 
$2.00 Brownie up. Our Department for Finishing Pictures is one of the 
best in the city, and we invite you to give us a trial. 

THE KORSMEYER DRUG CO. Phone, Mam 80. 

16 East Pikes Peak Avenue 




ACACIA HOTEL 



FACING ACACIA PARK 
in Center of City 



J. W. ATKINSON 

Prest. and Mgr. 



EVERYTHING IN FLOWERS 



OAw rftvtfh j $(M>ert 




7&^M^ t 



104 North Tejon St. 



Phone Main 599 



"Hard to Finer 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

CAN USUALLY BE FOUND HERK 





wice] 

Without Yf 
stud or 
limit /^j 



We carry the largest and most complete stock of records in the 
city. The three leading makes — Victor, Brunswick and Colum- 
bia Phonographs and Records — assuring you of a wide variety 
of artists and compositions to choose from. 



.PEERLTSS 



^ .. 



"The Store With a Personality" 
S. Tejon St. Phone M. 461W 

252 



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253 



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We Belong to 



^National Association of Accredited 



Commercial Schools 



REGULAR COURSES 



* 

BUSINESS COURSE 

The Business Course includes Bookkeeping, 
Actual Business Practice, Auditing, Business 
Management, Business Arithmetic, Commercial 
Law, Penmanship, Rapid Calculation, Business 
Letter Writing, Spelling, Typewriting and the 
use of the Adding Machine. 

SHORTHAND COURSE 

The vShorthand Course includes Shorthand, 
Typewriting, Spelling, Letter Writing, Punctu- 
ation, Penmanship, Dictaphone, and Office y 
Dictation, Office Training Practice, Filing, the 
use of the Multograph and Neostyle. 



SPECIAL WORK 

MAY BE ARRANGED IN 

SHORTHAND 

TYPEWRITING 

BOOKKEEPING 

POSTING MACHINE 

or CALCULATOR 



<$faxv>l 




QAot&do Sm'irzos, @lot5do 



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254 



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255 



11, 



Here's a Valuable Tip 



01 



sis 



HEN you leave Colorado Springs 
after you've finished your College 
course, or on vacation — you'll want 
to keep in touch with your friends 
here. Subscribe to 

tEuenmg m Celeftraph 

and have it sent to your new address in 
any part of the world. It will keep you 
posted on College sports and supply you 
with information about what your friends 
and acquaintances are doing in Colorado 
Springs. 



T 
► ■■4 

A 



The Price, 75c. Per Month 
Sunday Only, 20c. Per Month 



'TJhe £vening c Celegraph 
'Publishing Co. 



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Mcintosh -Anderson 
Motor Co., Inc. 



Accessories 




Service Station 



HUDSON and ESSEX MOTOR CARS 



25-27 N. Cascade— Main 287 



"Biggest Barber Shop in the World" 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Clean, First-Class Work 



E. L. BRUCE 

Proprietor 



COLORADO SPRINGS 
TIRE AND SERVICE STATION 



Gates s T read r Tires 



Carlisle Rope Tires 



Telephone Main 838 9 East Kiowa Street 



256 



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257 



Ph 



Ed 




Studio Faults 

Burns Theatre Building, Colorado Springs 

Phone 3328 J 

SITTINGS BY APPOINTMENT 

PORTRAITS OF QUALITY 



Exclusive Styles 



=♦♦= 



PRICES JUST RIGHT 

Portrait Framing 



Quality the Best 



COPYING and ENLARGING— Finished in Oil and Natural Colors 



STECKEL-FULTvS STUDIOS 336^ SOUTH BROADWAY, LOS ANGELES 



W 



258 



m 




259 



11, 



A world of people in Denver when they feel hungry — just 
naturally think of The Edelweiss and the good things 
there to eat. 



ORCHESTRA NOON" AND EVENING 



The EDELWEISS Cafe ,6!! °*— *- 



Charles Suchotzki, Proprietor. 



DENVER 



'The Home of Good Food" 




h A I ■' N S W O R T H 

PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 

are made in five sizes and three grades and take 

all standard and special attachments, adapting 

them to every service. 

Send for Catalog B 
WM. AINSWORTH & SONS, Denver, Colo. 



THE PRECSION FACTORY 



Tony Sarconi 



H. E. Wolff 



Sarconi Billiard 
= Company^ 

Meet Your Friends or 
Fraternity Brother Here 



1642-1644 Welton Street 



DENVER, COLORADO 



m 



Eighteen Y e a r s without a Los s 



FIRST MORTGAGE 
FARM LOANS 

The reputation of an investment house is the main 
consideration. No investor has ever suffered a loss of 
any kind on any farm mortgage security purchased 
from us. Every mortgage made by us is subject to the 
strictest investment tests, which tests have been de- 
veloped by us thru years of experience. Invest your 
funds with a permanent, time-proven organization. 
We collect the interest and look after all details until 
maturity. Call for our booklet, "Farm Mortgages," 
and circulars describing our individual loans. 

The Western Securities Co. 

FARM MORTGAGE BANKERS 



C. C. Bennett, President 
T. B. Stearns, Vice-Pres. 



Harry K. Brown, Vice-Pres. 
H. A. Bradford, Treas. 



vSuiTE 410 First National Bank Building 

Denver, Colorado 

Telephone Main 1866 



Eighteen Y ears without a Loss 



M 



260 



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Adv. 



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THE PIKES PEAK 
CONSOLIDATED FUEL 

COMPANY 

PRODUCERS WHOLESALERS RETAILERS 

General Offices: Telephone : 

1 25 E. Pikes Peak Main 577 



■ „„„ ■ 



262 




'2 63 



■i 



STANDISH HOTEL 

DENVER 

C.C. Headquarters 




California Street between Fifteenth and Sixteenth 

S. C. Hoover, Proprietor 
Walter W. Biller, Manager 



James Howard 

BARBER SHOP 



19 East Bijou Street 



Colorado Springs 



m 



m 



The Boys 

are Authorities 

on Style 






it 



The Boys store is not only a store 
for the man who follows fashions - 
it is also a store for the man whom 
fashion follows. 

"TRADE WITH THE BOYS" 



B*mo% 



>tratforb ClotfjeS "for the man of to-day* 



264 



'11 



-— TSBBIB^^ 




265 



11; 




PASSENGER and 
COMMERCIAL CARS 




Lowest in First Cost 
Minimum in Upkeep 



Telephone Main 507 

14 East Bijou Street 



Valentine Furniture Company 

FURNITURE THAT PLEASES 



'16 N. Tejon Street 



Phone, Main 147.S. Colorado Springs C( 



Window Cards that Compel Attention 
CLASSY ANNOUNCEMENTS, PROGRAMS, MENUS 



'Where Good 



fi&BI^ 



Printing is Dene" 



10 East Cucharras Street Phone Main 2716 



Tickets — Business Cards — Stationery 



m 



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UNDERWOOD SERVICE 



Everything for the Typewriter User 



UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER COMPANY 

130 North Tejon St. Phone Main 1017 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 



We are glad to be of service to C. C. Students 

ROYAL HAT WORKS 

CLEANERS, BLOCKERS and 
DYERS of All Kinds of HATS 



Phone Main 644 



27 East Kiowa St. 



Timely 




and Exclusive Models 
for Your Selection 



Our policy is to show these latest styles to College people first. 

One and two strap patterns in all eiders 
and combinations 



WulffshoeCo. 



$5 to $10 



110 SOUTH TEJON STREET 



266 



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267 



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Meet at 



MURRAY'S 

{Opposite Campus) 



WHERE 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 

ARE ALWAYS 

WELCOME 

AND 

ALWAYS FEEL 

AT HOME 



— Fraternity Shields, 
Stationery and C. C. 
Jewelry — We will order 
special what yon desire 
in this line 



w 



Exclusive Agents in Colo. 
Springs for Whitman's and 
Baur's Chocolates and 
Confections 



Text Books and all supplies for 
Colorado College Students 



The Murray Drug 
Company 

SUPERIOR SERVICE STOKES 



Main Store 
21 S. Tejon 



North Store 

Opp. Campus 



SUPERIOR 



DYEING AND CLEANING COMPANY 

C. 0. HOBB.S 

DYEING, CLEANING AND 
PRESSING 



Ask about our Club Rates 
Phone Main 1364 129 North Tejon Street 



Original ft 



ITlaniteu 



99 



SPARKLING WATER 

AND 

GINGER CHAMPAGNE 



Bottled at the Original Group of Springs at 
Manitou, Colorado 



THE MANITOU MINERAL WATER CO. 

MANITOU, COLORADO 



268 



m 




269 



11, 



CI TY SUB -BITUMINOUS COAL 



XXX 



THE BEST BY 
EVERY TEST 

XXX 



CITY COAL MINES 

5 E. PIKES PEAK AVENUE 
Phones 67 and 120 



CLIFFORD W. HARDY 

JEWELER 
ART DEALER 



COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



Printing 



IS THE INSEPARABLE COMPANION 
OF ACHIEVEMENT 



The H. & H. Printing Co. 



"Milkers of Good Printing." 

C. J.HAASIC, Manager. IIS Nevada Av< 



H- ; 



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Phone Main 569 J 



Established in 1910 



The BIJOU CAFETERIA 

W. F. ROGERS and C. A. WEINBERGER 

LUNCH COUNTER 

Corner Nevada Ave., Opposite Y. M. C. A. COLORADO SPRINGS 

...ladies' rest room... 



" Get Acquainted with Us — You Might Like Us" 
Telephone Main 987 

The Mountain Tire 8z Gas Co. 

V. E. ROWTON, Manager 

Quick Service— TIRES, ACCESSORIES, VULCANIZING— Fair Treatment 

28-32 South Nevada Ave. Filling Stations Colorado Springs 

No. 1, Colo, at Nev. No. 2, Colo, at 8th St. No. 3 at Fountain, Colo. 



Fill Niches in C. C. Life 



n 



Derngood Saturday Candy Features. 
Derngood Freshly Roasted Coffee. 

Nearly every C. C. man or woman has enjoyed some 
of the hundreds of pounds of Derngood Candy Fea- 
tures offered each Saturday. 

And Derngood Freshly Roasted Coffee has helped to 
make the hikes and picnics and parties enjoyable. 



26 South 



Tejon DERN'S 



270 



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. . . 






188S9 



of The. Poofo 



271 




Colorado College 



CLYDE A. DUNIWAY, President 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION and BANKING 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



All Departments offer the same grade of advantages as those in the 

best Eastern Institutions 



272 



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Cossitt 
Commons 
Dining 
Hall 




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273 



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THE 



Picture and Frame Store 

of Colorado Springs 




THE PHOTO -CRAFT SHOP 

One-One-One North Tejon Street, Colorado Springs 



The 



Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Builders' Supplies 



As we operate our own planing mill we are in a 

position to furnish your needs in 

this line promptly 



i \ 7 to 123 West Vermijo Avenue 



Is your House 
systematically lighted? 



Cf It is a technical question, but a practical one, 
too. Proper lighting is an asset to health and 
happiness. 

€J And the light company, thru Prof. R. R. 
Tileston of Colorado College offers you just such 
information. In building a new house, in re- 
modeling an old one, at home or in your store 
you want lighting that is technically right. 

C| Prof. Tileston is at your service without cost 
to you. It is one of the scores of things your 
light company offers you as a service that goes 
with the electricity and the gas you buy. 



Phone Main 
2400 



Colorado Springs Light, 
Heat & Power Company 



m 



27 4 



PAGE 4li.— THE AGGIE GAME— Except No. 7 is Utah Game. 
PAGE 54.— D. U. GAME. 

1. Tiger's Forward Pass. — 2. Tackle. — 3. Chuck Ball off Tackle. — 4. McMillan through Tackle. — 5. Slant Briggs tackled after catching a pass. — 6. Tigers pass; notice ball in the air. — 
7. Piled up after a short gain. 

PAGE 70.— UTAH GAME. 

PAGE 86.— SOPHOMORE BANQUET. 

1. Freshman Aviating. — 2. Sophomore Banquet. (Left to right, giving upper faces first when in vertical line.) Rivers, Howbert, Overholt, James, , Kidder, Gagliano, Emery, Rice, 

Nichols, Downer, Greiner, Logan, Sandown, Kimble, Dern, Eddins, Howbert, Rockefellow. Amidon, Mitterwallner, Croll, Thatcher, Mussey, Wilbur, Drake, Fisher, Nunn, Tait, Taylor, Muncaster, 
Saffold. 

PAGE 88.— FROSH-SOPH SCRAP. 

1. (Outsie) Bill Rivers. (Getting out) Kenneth Sewell. (White Sweater front seat) Bud Lewis. — 2. Sophomores with Frosh's shoes. Bill Rivers, Bud Lewis, Gus Overholt, Paul Spencer, 
Bruce Matlock, Ryan Kay. — 3. One Automobile load. — 4. Scrap after chapel. — 5. (Standing) Kenneth Sewell, Nesbit, Millner, . — 6. Sewell takes off shoes for 14 mile walk. 

PAGE 89.— INSIGNIA DAY. — 1. Graduating Class '22.—?. Going to chapel. 

PAGE 90. — 1. Juniors game on Pikers Day. — 2. Insignia Day 1921. — 3. Outside of chapel. 

PAGE 91. Y. W. C. A. CIRCUS. 

1. (Top row) Elizabeth Southmayd, Mildred Mann, Evangeline Dascomb. (Lower row) Mabel Saddler, Edith Mantey, Gertrude Harrington. — 2. (Standing) Mary Thayer, Dorothy Broad- 
head, Helen Graybeal. (Lower row) Georgia Allen, Alberta Matteson, Betty Roseberry. — 3. Gertrude Sherk, Inez Maupin. — 4. Gertrude Sherk. — 5. Mildred Earnest, Margaret Sargent, Lillian 
Sullivan, Dorothy Gene Barker, Nellie Earne-.t, (Center) Frances Hurst. — 6. Helen James. 

PAGE 92.— PAN PAN PAGE. — 1. Pan Pan December 1921.— 2. D. U. Game Thanksgiving Day 1921. 

PAGE 93. — ALL COLLEGE PICNIC. — Upper picture, Chow line. — Lower picture, Looking down from Gateway Rocks. 

PAGE 94.— COLORADO COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL OF SURVEYING. 

1. (Standing) McDonald, Cramer, Sherm Bushnell, Wood, Owens, Towles, Burgess, Prof. Okey. (In center). (Lower row) Emery, McMillan, Graves, Taylor. — 2. (Standing) Perk Bush- 
nell. The Old Man, Owens, Corley. (Lower row) Cramer, Emery, Woods, Taylor. — 3. Camp Colorado. — 4. Perk Bushnell, Woods, Taylor, Owens, Corley. — 5. The End of a Perfect Day. 

PAGE 95. PIKERS DAY 1921. 

PAGE 96.— MAY FESTIVAL 1921. 

1. Helen Thebus, Eleanor Bartlett. 
PAGE 97.— HOME COMING DAY. 

1. Flashlight of barbecue. — 2. Stena Dearborn, Mary Clegg Owen, Doris Haymes, Faye Lilley, Serena Mcintosh, Rowena Hampshire, Nina Shaffer. — 3. Nina Shaffer, Rowena Hampshire, 
Doris Haymes.— 4. Marie Farmer, Marjorie Collier, Mary Kemp, Lorene Reynolds, Clara Burghart. 

PAGE 98.— GLEE CLUB OPERETTA CAST. 

(Top row) Martha Mae Kirkpatrick, Zella Brown, Inez Maupin. (Lower row) Ruth Pollock, Martha Stewart, Elsie Baier, Betty Gale Beckman, Francis Tucker, Clara Vorrieter, Mar- 
garet Morris, Ruth Hopkins. 

PAGE 99. CHINESE LANTERN SET. 

PAGE 100. 

1. Chinese Lantern Cast. (Top row) Elizabeth Card, Rita Fist, Leila Taylor, Dorothy Masters, Ruth Pollock, Catherine Morton, Lydia Schilling, Dorothy Dorlac, (Lower row) Tillie 
Vincent, Lucy Fast, Gertrude Klein, Gertrude Sherk, Suoma Leino, Margaret Morris, Rowena Hampshire. — 2. A Slave With Two Faces. (Top row) Elizabeth Card, Nell Hutchinson. (Bottom 
row) Dorothy Nyhus, Anna Jane Hitchcock, Irene McClelland. 

PAGE 101. 

1. The Wonder Hat Cast. Margaret Carter, Ruth Hutchinson, Mary Clegg Owen, Dorothy Niccolls, Elise Burnett, Mary Morris, Gertrude Klein. — 2. Crimson Cocoanut Cast. Marie 
Bollinger, Margaret Morris, Gertrude Klein, Rita Fist, Lucy Fast. 

PAGE 104. 

Debating Teams. (Upper) Benbow, Mahan, Duniway. (Lower) Kimble. Sheppard, Wendelken. 
PAGE 106. AGGIE GAME. 

PAGE 110.— "C" CLUB GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Parks, Parsons, MacKenzie, MacTavish, Patterson, Waiss, Armit, Bruce, Kestling, Nichols, Burghart, Page, Daywalt, Hicks, Greiner, Hankins, Sheppard, Muncaster. (Second 
row standing) Wolfe, Amidon, Graham, Mitterwallner, Lyles, Donaldson. (Lower row) Robinson, Jackson, Ball, Kief, Ryan, Harvey, Carter, Briggs, MacDougall, Wesson, Morton, Nelson, Padget. 

2T5 



m- : 



Its Our Prime Ambition 

to be known as the Young Men's 
Store ----where College and High 
School fellows feel that we appre- 
ciate their business 



We are continually on the lookout for distinctive style 

in Young Men's wearing apparel — never forgetting 

dependable serviceability 




"Exclusive, but not expensive" 



20 N. TEJON ST. 



Perkins-Shearer 
Company 



m 



m 



We thank you for your patronage during the 
season just closing and will be glad to serve 
you again next fall. 

MEALY the Florist 



Telephone Main 10S2 



30 North Tejon Street 



COLLEGE BAKERY 

We Carry a Complete Line of Bakery Goods 

Lunches Served and Put Up 

Special Attention Given to Parties 

Phone Main 1317-J 



Albany Hotel 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

IN THE LIEART OF 
THINGS 



Near down-town district 
convenient to theatres. 



A Home-Like place for 
Teacher and Student. 



Study Rooms on Second Floor 

A popular-priced place for the Teacher and Student. 

Owned and managed by an ex-teacher. 

We solicit investigation. 



Phone, Main, 



3Q30- 3Q3i 



216 



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PAGE 117. 

1. MacDougall 2nd in the Low Hurdles. — 1. MacTavish, Broad Jumps. — 3. Lyles, 2nd in the High Hurdles. — 4. Carter Pole Vault. — 5. Patterson and Willard finishing 440 in dead heat. 
6. Pink Lyles. — 

PAGE 13B.— GOLF TEAM PICTURE.— Gildea, MacTavish, Armit, Purington, Clay. 

PAGE 138.— TENNIS TEAM PICTURE.— Wolfe, Hankins, Clough, Sweet. 

PAGE 139.— WRESTLING TEAM.— (Top row) Williamson, Muncy, Crump, Hinton. (Bottom row) Padgett, Eakin, Hamilton. 

PAGE 140.— BOXING TEAM. 

(Top row) Cox, Dickson, Hinton. (Bottom row) Graham, Killian, Wolfe, Miller. 
PAGE 141.— FRESHMEN FOOTBALL NUMERAL MEN. 

(Top row) Tucker, Taft, Moreland, Jencks, Hunter, Mathews, Arms. (Bottom row) Hunt, Cronell, Muncy, Zickefoose, MacDougall, Hamilton, Briggs. 

PAGE 142.— FRESHMEN FOOTBALL. 

1. Frosh vs. St. Regis. — 'i. Frosh Squad. (Top row) Babcock, F. MacDougall, Al Kyffin, James, Eaken. (Second row) Morris, Schaede, Crandall, Taft, , Rippey, Hunt, Hope, 

Coach Holman. (Third row) Zickefoosse, Maher, Chapman, Hamilton, Govereau, Miller, Moreland, Douglas. (Bottom row) Hunter, Briggs, Winans, Mathews, Arms, Kenneth Sewell, Wilson. 

PAGE 145.— NUGGET BOARD. 

(Top row) Paul Sundbury, Francis Tucker, Perkins Bushnell, George Croll, Helen Finlay, Russell Hunter. (Middle row) Keith Chick, Myron Carter. (Lower row) Perry Greiner, Ann 
Herzog, Lewis Chatham, Malcolm Graham, Roxana Jackson, Carl Brumfield. 

PAGE 147.— TIGER BOARD. 

(Two upper left) Lewis Chatham, Suoma Leino. (First diagonal) Campbell Rice, Alex Chapman, John Duniway. (Second diagonal) Samuel McCool, Zella Brown, Keith Chick, Francis 
Tucker, Eino Leino, Winifred Moulton, Jeff Wardwell. (Third diagonal) Lester Powell, Reith Strachan, Lorraine Moody. (Lower right) Virginia Newman, Ira Hicks. 

PAGE 149.— STUDENT COMMISSION. 

(Upper) Mary Clegg Owen, Gertrude Klein, Ed Morath. (Diagonal) Ian MacKenzie, Doris Haymes, Gladys Glendenning, Don McMillan, Delia Scott, Alice Sweet, Frank Briggs. (Lower 
three) Mark Skidmore, Earl Harvey, Frances Tucker. , 

PAGE 151.— MINERVA. 

(Upper two) Mary Clegg Owen, Jean Kirby. (Diagonal) Lutie Marshall, Clara Burghart, Frances Tucker, Suoma Leino, Rowena Hampshire. (Lower two) Zella Brown, Nina Shaffer. 
PAGE 153.— CONTEMPORARY. 

(Upper three) Bernice Williams, Ruth Hegener, Christine Miller. (Middle) Mae Gallavan, Gertrude Klein. (Diagonal) Dorothy Nyhus, Anna Herzog, Harriett Mason, Marion Little, Lor- 
raine Moody, Juanita White, Eleanor Bartlett. (Lower three) Edna Van Horn, Ruth Little, Ruth Staff. 

PAGE 155.— HYPATIA. 

(Upper three) Elizabeth Brown, Serena Mcintosh, Clara Vorrieter. (Middle) Delsie Holmquist, Gladys Glendenning. (Diagonal) Fay Lilley, Adelaide Brown, Gertrude Sherk, Margaret 
Carter, Alice Sweet, Doris Haymes, Harriett Bumstead. (Lower three) Evelyn Stannard, Vera Weagle, Martha Tucker. 

PAGE 15fi. TOWN GIRL'S ASSOCIATION. 

(Top row) Helen Brown, Margaret Morris, Ruth Little. (Middle row) Delia Scott, Mary Morris, Marion Little, Esther Norton, Christine Miller. (Lower row) Jessie Morrow, Margaret 
Thomas, Nina Shaffer, Clara Burghart, Adelaide Easley. 

PAGE 157. SCIENCE CLUB. 

(Top row) Bill Sennings, Kenneth Gordon. (Middle row) Harry Newman, Chester Shaffer, Dwight Taylor, Carl Brumfield, Beecher Fawcett. (Lower row) Margaret Thomas, Nina Shaffer, 
Fern Pring. Dorothy Kinney, Ruth Hegener. 

PAGE 159.— FRENCH CLUB. 

(Top row) Miss Landers, Mr. Skidmore, Mr. Latimer. (Middle row) Harriet Bumstead, Frances Tucker, Eleanor Graham, Ellen Weir, Florence Greene. (Bottom row) Marjorie O'Brien, 
Jean Kirby, Ann Herzog, Rowena Hampshire. 

PAGE 160.— THE TIGER CLUB.— Suoma Leino, President. 

PAGE lfil.— GIRLS' GLEE CLUB. 

(Top row) Zella Brown, Margaret Morris, Ruth Pollock, Nell Hutchinson, Leila Taylor, Ruth Hopkins, Joan Heckenlively, Nellie Earnest, Helen Brown, Elsie Baier. (Second row) Marie 

Bollinger, Dorothy Dorlac, Lydia Schilling, Ruth Hutchinson, Elizabeth Knox, Harriet Bumstead, Mary Kemp, Mabel Sadler, Clara Vorreiter, Gail Beckman. (Third row) , Francis 

Tucker, Thelma Blaine, Mrs. Tucker, Martha Tucker, Ellen Weir, Helen DeWoody, Martha Sevitz. (Lower row) Lorena Berger. (Insert) Mildred Finlay, Inez Maupin, Leta Gale, Dorothy 
Graves, Ethel Fay Asbury, Dorothy Jean Barker. 

PAGE 1B2.— K. U. K. 

(Upper left) Jack Dern, Mary Clegg Owen. (Diagonal, left to right) Bob Mcllvaine, Eino Leino, Suoma Leino, Miss Bramhall, Albert Lyles, Serena Mcintosh, Lilla Munger. (Lower 
right) Keith Chick, Reith Strachan. 

211 



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PAGE. 163. — A.-B. (LIB. 

(Top row) Chen, Thompson, Sheppard, Wardwell, Struthers, Lin. (Middle row) Padgett, Mabel Sadler, Florence Lawson, Edna Van Horn, Mrs. Easley, Mary Hicks. (Lower row) Ander- 
son, Margaret Carter, Dern, Mahan, Lucille Lilyard, Thatcher. 

PAGE 164.— FORTNIGHTLY SKETCH CLUB. 

(Top row) Elizabeth Knox, Leslie Green, Henry Mann, Margaret Morrow, Dorothy Carnine. (Middle row) Norma Bright, Elma Jane Clopper, Catherine Morton, Margaret Conklin, Inez 
Maupin. (Lower row) Ruth Williamson, Margaret Ellis, Miss Learning, Helen Finlay . 

page ie«.— Euterpe. 

(Top) Helen Sterling, Christine Miller, (Middle) Jessie Spicer, Esther Norton, Beryl Griswold, Mrs. Reutlinger. (Bottom) Mrs. Friedman, Ester Friedman, Dean Hale, Marjorie Drake. 

PAGE 166.— MEN'S GLEE CLUB. 

(Top row) Strachan, Marshall, Taylor, Mahan, Mann, Kyffin, Struther. (Middle row) Coons, Dan Hale, Maher, Don Hale, G. Winans, T. Winans. (Bottom row) Hansen, L. Sewell, Reink- 
ing, Brumneld, Dean Hale, Emery, Heller, Thatcher. 

PAGE 167.— BAND. 

(Top row) G. Winans, P. Bushnell, Marshall, Taylor, Thompson. (Lower row) Reinking, Brumneld, Fair, V. G. Scott. 
PAGE 168.— EPISCOPAL CLUB. 

(Top row) Clyde Babcock, , , Alexander Taft, , Miss Phinney, Ezra Cornell, Proctor Nichols. (Second row) — — , — -, Helen Wells. (Bottom row) 

Gertrude Harrington, Betty Roseberry, Marjorie Collier, Ida May Burleigh, Lilla Munger, Helen Beardsley. 

PAGE 169. WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

(Top row) Mae Gallavan, Ruth Little, Miss Davis. (Middle row) Mary Morris, Stena Dearborn, Florence Lawson, Mildred Rule. (Lower row) Francis Tucker, Eleanor Bartlett, Harriet 
Bumstead, Gertrude Sherk. 

PAGE 170.— Y. W. C. A. CABINET. 

(Top row) Marjorie Collier, Clara Burghart, Olive Haun, Marie Farmer. (Middle row) Ora Gjerde, Marie Bollinger, Norma Bright, Helen Armstrong, Vera Weagle, Elizabeth Brown. 
(Lower row) Sadie Kier, Delsie Holmquist, Adelaide Brown, Ruth Staff, Mary Hicks, Alice Sweet. 

PAGE 171.— MANDOLIN CLUB. 

(Top row) Lois McMullen, Clara Vorreiter, Sibyl Jellison. (Middle row) -- — , Florence Wilson, Marjorie Drake, — — . (Lower row) Elizabeth Williamson, Elizabeth Brown, 
Lillian Sullivan, Josephine Miller, Mildred Earnest. 

PAGE 1T1. ATHENIAN DEBATING SOCIETY. 

(Top row) Lois Rose, Florence Lawson, Marjorie Collier, Edna Theobald, Mildred Finlay. (Middle row) Anna Jane Hitchcock, Clara Burghart, Lorene Reynolds, Marie Farmer, Thelma 
Burchfield, Mabel Sadler. (Lower row) Mary Kemp, Delia Scott, Gertrude Klein, Edna Van Horn, Helen Finlay, Olive Haun. 

PAGE 173.— BIOLOGICAL PERIPATETICS. 

(Standing) Dr. Gilmore, Billie Gilmore, Eunice McCampbell, Harriett Mason, Margaret Thomas, Ruth Hegener, Helen Armstrong, Olive Haun, Professor Fling, Thelma Bradley, Lorraine 
Moody, Bill Sennings. (Sitting) Jeff Davis, Russell Hunter, Bobby Hilmore, Glenora Oliver, Jessie Morrow, Dorothy Matthews, Kenneth Gordon. 

PAGE 174.— Y. M. C. L. 

(Top row) Lusk, Lyles, Amos. (Lower row) Drucker, Dern, Taylor. 
PAGE 175.— HAGERMAN HALL ASSOCIATION. 

(Top row) Almirall, Logan, Millner. (Middle row) Chen, Heller, Lin, G. Scott. (Bottom row) Weldon, McCormick, E. Sheppard, P. Bushnell, Nesbit. 
PAGE 176. STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION. 

(Top row) Adelaide Brown, Merle Love, Edna Van Horn, Lilla Munger. (Lower row) Gladys Glendenning, Delsie Holmquist, Mildred Finlay, Alice Sweet. 
PAGE 177. CLASSICAL CLUB. 

(Top row) Harry Newman, Eada Gilberg, , Dr. Mierow, Evangeline Joder, Bonnie Walker, Dorothy Roedel. (Second row) Florence Greene, , , Miss Printup, 

Elizabeth Trotter, Mildred Earnest, , Helen Jenner. (Third row) Ora Gjerde, Evangeline Dascomb, Lillian Sullivan, John Duniway, Anna Jane Hitchcock, Dorothy Carnine. (Lower 

row) , Mary Hicks, Nina Whisler, Marjorie O'Brien, Margaret Sargent. 

PAGE 178.— THE DAIS. 

(Top row) Dorothy Kinney, Lois Gauld, Josephine Miller. (Middle row) Miss Merrill, Delsie Holmquist, Adelaide Brown, Suoma Leino, Francelia Eldridge. (Lower row) Gladys Glen- 
denning, Merle Love, Norma Bright, Elizabeth Knox, Rowena Hampshire. 

PAGE 179.— SPANISH CLUB. 

(Top row) Harleyn West, Laveta Tevebaugh, Professor Latimer, Pablo Almirall, Florence Green. (Bottom row) Leta Gale, Bob Mcllvaine. Professor Skidmore, Dorothy Graves, 
Martha Tucker. 

279 




280 



PAGE ISO.— DRAMATIC CLUB BOARD. 

(Top row) Gertrude Klein, Lois Gauld, Gertrude Sherk, Francis Tucker. (Middle row) Gladys Glendenning, Faye Lilley, Suoma Leino, Mildred Finlay, Serena Mcintosh. (Lower row) 
Ann Herzog, Rowena Hampshire, Harriet Bumstead, Alice Sweet. 

PAGE 181.— PEARSONS DRAMATIC CLUB. 

(Top row) Brumfield, Taylor, Mann, Amos, McCool. (Lower row) Wendelken, Collins, Wardwell, Copeland. 
PACE 188.— QUESTION CLUB. 

(Top row) Greiner, Ball, MacKenzie, Hansen, Lyles, Haymes. (Middle row) Thomas, Sewell, F. MacDougall, Delaney, Hunt. (Front row) Mcintosh, M. Carter, Moreland, F. Briggs, 
H. Briggs. (Seated) Harvey, Mai MacDougall, Patterson. 

PAGE 183. INDEPENDENT CLUB. 

(Top row) Mathews, Cramer, Anderson, Williamson, McCormick, Olson, Milner, Kurth, Duniway, Nesbit, Mull, Almirall, Bushnell. (Sitting) Gagliano, Brewer, Tripp, Brice, Scott, Brewer, 
Logan, Heller. 

PAGE 184.— FRATERITY HOUSES. 

1. Alpha Nu House. — 2. Clyde Overholt, Peanuts Strong. Claire Miller, Ellett Bliss, Liston Sewall. — 3. Phi Gamma Delta House. —4. Beta Theta Pi House. — 5. Phi Delta Theta House.— 
6. Pi Kappa Alpha House. — 7. Kappa Sigma House. — 8. Sigma Chi Parlor. — 9. Sigma Chi House. 

PAGE 1S7.— KAPPA SIGMA FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Awes, Morath, Cox, Round, Lewis, Hanse, Forry, Eakin, Muncy, Doubt, Clark. (Second row) Morris, Moreland, Young, Mierow, Jencks, Thomas, Hankins, Louthan, Lawson, 
Richardson, Bowman. (Third row) Weaver, Seeley, Arps, Green, Mahan, Wolfe, Morton, Bemis, Park, Kestling. (Fourth row) Williams, Davis, Padget, Cornell, Hunt, Kay. 

PAGE 189.— SIGMA CHI FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) O'Brien, Hinton, Fisher, Waiss, Hansen, Allen, Thomas. (Center row) Tait, Williamson, James, Daywalt, Emery, Croll, Maher. (Bottom row) Benbow, Wardwell, Wendel- 
ken, Ball, Graham, Carter, Darling, Williamson. 

PAGE 191.— PHI GAMMA DELTA FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Linger, Bruce, Olson, Dern, Staff, Ed. Ryan, Harrison. (Second row) Jacobs, Edgar, Sewell, Howbert, Delaney, R. Hunter, Robinson, Dawson. (Bottom row) Atkinson, Parker, 
Harvey, F. Ryan, Mcllvaine, Patterson, Hart. 

PAGE 193. PHI DELTA THETA FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Tancred, Keif, F. MacDougall, Tucker, Kidder, Greiner. (Next row) McBride, Taft, Hunter, Brumfield, Wessen, Nichols. MacDonald. (Next row) E. Crockett, Taylor, 
Collins, M. MacDougall, Jackson, Armit, F. Briggs, B. Crockett. (Bottom row) McCool, Berry, Hamilton, H. Briggs, Crowder. 

PAGE 195.— BETA THETA PI FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Strachan, Flaherty, DeFries, Muncaster, Wigram, Kvffin. (Second row) Waddel, Lee Johnson, Eddins, Crandall, Burghart, Sweeney, English. (Third row) Melvin Haymes, 
MacTavish, MacKenzie, Leino, Lyons, Capps. (Fourth row) Keyte, Thatcher, Hergner, Amidson, Mcintosh. 

PAGE 197. PI KAPPA ALPHA FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Mann, Marshall, Page, Zickefoose, Schaede, Ogle, T. Winans, Young. (Next row) Sandow, Fawcett, Koerner, Gordon, G. Winans, Rice, Mathews, Kingsbury. (Next row) 
Leisy, Boucher, Taylor, Wallis, Dein, Okey, Wilbur, Owens. (Bottom row) Dixon, Kissinger, Fair, Miller, Gardner. 

PAGE 199.— ALPHA NU FRATERNITY GROUP PICTURE. 

(Top row) Phillips, Overholt, Hicks, Busey, Bushnell, Chatham. (Second row) Sundbury, Valore, Sennings, Anderson, Mussey, Pieffer. (Third row) Reinking, Arms, Powell, Lyles, Gil- 
more, Scott, Marschat, Strong. 

PAGE 200. INTER FRATERNITY COUNCIL. 

(Top row) Round, Parker, Wardwell, Fawcett, M. Carter. (Middle row) Mcllvaine, Lyons, Chick, Wolfe, Graham. (Lower row) Hulbert, Lyles, Mierow, Briggs, Wallis. 
PAGE 201.— ALPHA KAPPA PSI. 

(Top row) M. MacDougall, H. Taylor, E. Crockett, Park, R. Carter, M. Carter. (Middle row) Bemis, Amos, Postlethwaite, Leino, Chick, Wendelken. (Bottom row) Copeland, Drucker, 
Jencks, Mcllvaine, Graham. 

PAGE 202. PHI BETA KAPPA. 

(Top row) Dr. Gilmore, James Park, Dr. McMurtry, Dr. Duniway, Edmund Crockett, Albert Lyles, Mr. Latimer. (Middle row) Mr. Baxter, Dr. Davies, Marion Little, Lorena Berger, 
Olive Haun, Mary Clegg Owen, Mr. Sisam, Mr. Hulbert. (Lower row) Dean Hale, Miss Printup, Suoma Leino, Miss Bramhall, Miss Howbert, Rowena Hampshire, Ruth Staff, Dr. Mierow. 

PAGE 204.— SIGMA DELTA PSI. 

(From left to right) L. MacTavish, Patterson, Briggs, Mai MacDougall, Graham, Young, Greiner, Waiss, Morton, Lyles, Scott, Page. 

PAGE 205. DELTA EPSILON. 

(Top row) Chester Shaffer, Mr. Wapple, Albert Lyles, Mr. Smith, (Middle row) Thelma Kauffman, Miss Brumback, Miss Spingler, Miss Gerould. (Lower row) Dr. Davies, Dr. Gilmore, 
Mr. Sisam, Mr. Fling. 

281 



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PAGE 206.— THETA ALPHA PHI. 

(Top) Jeff Wardwell. (Middle row) Carl Brumfield, Rowena Hampshire, Fay Lilley, W. D. Copeland. (Lower row) Harry Taylor, Helen Thebus, Doris Haymes, Lowell Collins. 

PAGE 207— TAU KAPPA ALPHA. 

(Top row) Mcllvaine, Mahan, Amos. (Lower row) Wendelken, Dern, Kimble, Copeland. 
PAGE 210. BETA PAGE. 

1. Martina Maher, Eino Leino. — 2. (Top row) Amidon, Muncaster, MacKenzie, Lee Johnson, Capps, Flaherty, Haymes, Gene Johnson, Wigram, Strachan. (Lower row) Saffold, English, 
Lyons. MacTavish, Eddins. — 3. Eino Leino, Earl Lyons. — 4. MacTavish, Lyons, Saffold, Kyffin, Wigram, Muncaster. — 5. Ian MacKenzie. — (». Morris, Aitken, Burghart, Thomas, Lusk.--7. Mac- 
Tavish and the skunk. — 8. Colorado Betas at Estes Park. — 0. Bob Burghart. 

PAGE 225.— PHI GAM. PAGE. 

1. F. Ryan. — 2. Electric, Howbert, Parker — Trailing, Gray, Rose. Atkinson, Jacobs, Sherman. — 3. Al Linger. 4. Harvey. — 5. Bruce. -0. Jacobs. — 7. De Laney, Rawlings, Atkinson, 
Harrison, Gray, Jacobs, Dawson. — 8. Rockafellow, Howbert. — 9. Patterson. 

PAGE 227.— PARADE CELEBRATING BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP. 

1. Sigma Chi Stunt. — 2. Champion Banner. — 3. Evangeline Joder, Lucy Fast, Kathleen Morgan, Mary Seeley, Helen DeWoody, on the Bemis Float. — 4. Stagecoach carrying Tiger Team 
to Perkins Hall ; Shorty Donaldson mounting Tiger. — 5. Kappa Sigma Float. — 0. Championship Parade. — 7. Ticknor Hall Float ; (top row standing) Elizabeth Trotter, Mildred Earnest, Lilla Munger, 
Ethel Asbury, Rena Hestwood,; (seated) Nellie Earnest, Frances Hurst, Eleanor Henaghan, Eunice Scribner. — 8. Phi Gam Section of Parade. — 9. Pi Kap Float. — 10. Ira Hicks, Ralph Strong. 

PAGE 229. 

1. The Wonder Hat, Mary Morris, Elise Burnett, Dorothy Nicholls, Catherine Crockett. — 2. 1921 Track Team, Coach Parsons, Lyles, Nichols, Patterson, Carter, Greiner, Freeman, Mgr. 
Park, Lusk, Bruce, Donaldson, Trainer, Muncaster, Waiss, Kestling, MacTavish, Brown, Bemis, Graham, Morton, Kief, Fawcett. — 3. Dottie Niccolls, Puss Crocket. — 4. Helen Thebus. — 5. May 
Festival. —6. Just before the Freshmen-Sophomore fight. — 7. "Wonder View" on high drive. 

PAGE 231.— HYPATIA PAGE. 

1. Adelaide Brown, Dulcie Holmquist. — 2. Pledges, Elizabeth Brown, Clara Vorrieter, Gertrude Sherk, Evelyn Stannard, Margaret Carter — 3. Harriet Bumstead. — 4. Serena Mcintosh, 
Vera Waegle. — 5. Top row, Gladys Glendenning, Delsie Holmquist, Alice Sweet, Doris Haymes, Adelaide Brown, Serena Mcintosh, Lottie Crabtree, Martha Tucker, Vera Waegle, Harriet 
Bumstead, Lower row, Clara Vorrieter, Margaret Carter, Gertrude Sherk, Elizabeth Brown, Evelyn Stannard. — 0. Doris Haymes, Martha Tucker. 

PAGE 233. 

1. Meeting the team coming back from Wyoming. — 2. East Bleachers. — 3. Bonfire in stadium. — 4. Bliss takes a bath. — 5. Harry Goodwin, Ellett Bliss. 

PAGE 235. 

1. Coach Parsons. — 2. Bill Tway. — 3. Baseball Team 1921. (Upper row) Parsons, Bruce, Briggs, Coldren, Frank, Patterson, Donaldson, (Lower row) Wessen, Harvey, Mai MacDougall, 
Don MacDougall, Linger, Amidon, Robinson, Ball. — 4. Adelaide Brown. — 5. Elizabeth Trotter. — 0. Lorena Berger, Delsie Holmquist. — 7. After Frosh-Sophcmore scrap. — 8. Ethel Fay. — 
9. Chuck Page (?). — 10. Suoma Leino. — 11. Bob Allen. — 12. Bruce Matlock. — 13. Shorty Donaldson. 

PAGE 237. 

1. Andy and Min (Harold Waiss, Margaret Carter). — 2. Miss Eleanor Davis. — 3. (Top row) Carter, Rice, Sweet, Bickmore, Hinton, Wardwell, (Lower row) Wandell, Freeman, O'Brien, 
Graham, Croll, Wantland, Williamson, Albert, Ball, Cook. — 4. Dorothy Niccolls. — 5. Bill Saffold, Serena Mcintosh. — 6. Bertha Biology. — 7. (Top row) Mai MacDougall, Perk Bushnell, Ball, 
Vernon Scott, Greiner, Muncy, Fran MacDougall, Delaney, Lyles, Hinton, (Lower row) McCool, Crowder, Miss Lattimore, Sewell, Moreland. — 8. Lucille Lilyard and Curtis Hinton. 

PAGE 239.— PI KAPPA ALPHA PAGE. 

1. Simeon Wilbur. — 2. Kissinger, Wilbut, Rice, Zimmerman, Mann. — 3. , — , Beecher Fawcett. — 4. Beecher Fawcett, Erma Adams, Mildred Finlay, , Rena Hest- 
wood, Margaret Thomas, Kingsbury. — 5. Prof. Smith, Rena Hestwood, Mrs. Smith. — 6. , Fawcett, Prof, and Mrs. Smith, Erma Adams, Ralph Owen, , Dorothy Carnine, Kenneth 

Gordon. 

PAGE 241.— KAPPA SIGMA PAGE. 

1. (Top row) Louthan, Forey, (Next row) Hankins, Wendell, Eaken, Swan, (Bottom row) Cornell, Parks, Spencer, Bemis, Weaver, Arps, Davis, Cox, Wolfe. — 2. Bemis, Amos, Wolfe, Eaken 
(as strong man) Spencer and Arps at left. — 3. Weaver, Bemis, Eaken, Arps, Wolfe, Spencer, Louthan, Wendell, Forey. — 4. Copeland, Louthan, Dodge, Bemis, Muncy, Wendell, McCoy, Forey, 
Young, Gildea. — 5. Eaken, Cornell, Wolfe, Cox, Bemis. — 6. Amos, Wolfe, Bemis, Cox, Eaken, Wendell. — 7. Prof. Copeland. — 8. Spencer, Forey, Eaken, Lon Cornell, Amos, Weaver, Wolfe, Wend- 
dell. Swan, Arps. 

PAGE 243. 

1. Pikes Peak Auto Highway near Mile 17. — 2. Firemen to instruct Hall Girls in fire drill. — 3. Lawrence Marschat, Bill Rivers. — 4. Serena Mcintosh, Martha Tucker. — 5. Billie and Mary 
Ella Gilmore. — 6. Firedrill at Bemis. — 7. Lucille Lilyard, Andy Waiss, Min Carter. — 8. Baseball team. (Standing) Prof. Palm, Jimmie McCool, Coach Parsons, Swede Wesson. — 9. Al Kline in 
Lexington number 6. 

PAGE 245. 

1. Perkins Bushnell. — 2. Alice Turnbull, Harleyn West. — 3. Athenian Society: Helen Finlay, Gertrude Klein, Emma O'Brien, Marjorie Collier, Ruth Gilliland, Evelyn Austin, Miss Hutsin- 
pillar, Miss Phinney, Helen Morton, Ruth Morrison, Delia Scott, Helen McKinney, Edna Van Horn. — 4. Eleanor Graham. — 5. Katherine Burns, Jean McDonald. — 6. Bubbles Mitterwallner. 
7. Ed Ryan, Edgar Howbert, Bob Edgar, Joe Atkinson, Frances Ryan, Doc Vanderhoof, Hub Johnson, Pat Patterson, Bob Mcllvaine, Gob Harvey. — 8. Bruin Inn. — 9. Mildred Rule. — 
10. Perkins Bushnell, Glen Scott, Don McCormick, Paul Nesbit, Milner, Ralph Heller, Henry Weldon, Paul Logan. 

283 



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PAGE 251.— MINERVA PAGE. 

1. Nina Shaffer, Rowena Hampshire. — 2. Rowena Hampshire. — 3. Clara Burghart, Frances Tucker. — 4. Mary Clegg Owen, Nina Shaffer., lower left Lutie Marshall. — 5. Mary Clegg Owen. 
6. Bernice Miles, Suoma Leino, Lutie Marshall, Nina Shaffer, Neva Ritter, A. Covey, Mary Clegg Owen. —7. Suoma. 

PAGE 253.— ATHENIAN PAGE. 

1. Florence* Lawson, Olive Haun, Clara Burghart, Delia Scott. — 2. Mary Kemp, Marie Farmer. — 3. Delia Scott, Edna Theobold, Gertrude Klein, Helen Finlay, Mrs. Essex, Mable Sadler, 
Edna Van Horn, Lorene Reynolds, Florence Lawson. — 1. Helen and Mildred Finlay. — Olive Haun, Clara Burghart, Delia Scott, Florence Lawson. 

PAGE 255.— CONTEMPORARY PAGE. 

1. Edna Van Horn, Ruth Hegener, Eleanor Bartlett. — 2. Harriet Mason, Gertrude Klein, Edna Van Horn. — 3. Anna Herzog, Gertrude Klein. — I. Edna Van Horn, Gertrude Klein, Harriet 
Mason. — 5. Marion Little, Eleanor Bartlett. — 6. Ruth Hegener, Edna Van Horn, Harriet Mason, Ruth Staff, Gertrude Klein. — 7. Harriet Mason. — 8. Edna Van Horn. 9. Harriet Mason, Edna 
Van Horn, Gertrude Klein. — 10. (Top row) Anna Maud Garnett, Mrs. Emma Grant, Priscilla Nicholson, Ruth Brown, Neata Green, Eileen Carrick, Mrs. Louise Fanteaux, Irena Hamilton, Evelyn 
Campbell, Ruth Hegener, Edna Van Horn, Gertrude Klein, Anna Herzog. (Bottom row) Marion Little, Mary Randall, Creta Hanes. 

PAGE 257. ALPHA Nil PAGE. 

1. Rippey, Goodwin, Strong, Arms, John Lyles. — 2. Prof. Gilmore. — 3. Arms, Rippey, John Lyles. -4. Mitterwallner, Sewell, Marschat. — 5. Sewell, Strong, Bliss. Rippey, Overholt, Powell, 
Miller. 

PAGE 259.— SIGMA CHI PAGE. 

(Top row pictures) 1. Sigma Chi House. — 2. Dink Croll. — 3. Dink Croll, Campbell Rice, Ray Darling. — 4. Living Room. — 5. Campbell Rice. — (Lower row pictures) 1. Ray Darling. — 

2. Russell Carter, Spud Tait. — 3. Russell Carter, Spud Tait. 

PAGE 263. 

1. Katherine Morton, Irma Patton, Margaret Conklin, Ruth Hutchinson, Elizabeth Knox, Marietta Briggs, Bethany Reinking, Ruth Pollock, Elise Burnett. — 2. Lester Busey, Fern Rader. 

3. (Top row) Wendelken, Graham, Bemis, Russell Carter, Park, Mcllvaine, Taylor, (Bottom row) Chick, Amos, Myron Carter, Mai MacDougall. — 4. Arps, Strong, Govereau, Matlock, Ethell. — 

5. Junior Party. Bob Mcllvaine, Brad Kidder, Dwight Taylor, Jimmie Park, Bud Morton, Ray Green, JackLawson, Bill Thompson, Mabel Sadler, Helen Armstrong, Lilla Munger, Helen Finlay, 
Stena Dearborn, Mary Hicks, Mrs. Morrow, Anna Herzog, Harriet Mason, Gertrude Klein, Ruth Hegener, Ruth Staff, Edna Van Horn, Mr. Sargent seated in front. — 6. Cutler Bell. 

PAGE 265. 

1. Slant Briggs, Doris Haymes, Eleanor Heneghan, Heavy Linger, Martha Stewart. — 2. Vernon Scott, Enid Galley. Sherm Bushnell, Lillie Clements, Pinkie Lyles, Bernice Ryer. — 3. Pike 
Bruce, Lorena Berger, Thelma Blaine. — 4. Lillie Clements, Sherm Bushnell, La Verne Donnan, Vernon Scott, Shorty Powell. — 5. Prof. Busey, Dorothy Niccolls. — 6. Mickie McBride, Marjorie 
Wood. Dorothy Wetherall, Swede Jackson. — 7. Al Kyffin, Mary Seely. 

PAGE 267.— PHI DELTA THETA PAGE. 

1. Phi Delta Theta House. — 2. Alumni Group. (Tod row) Sid Robinson, Dutch Morris, , , Skinney Coldren, Tom Strachan, Ben Crockett. Floyd Smith, , Don 

MacDougall. (Second row) , Charles Smith, Harmon Brunner, Butch Brumfield, — — , John Carter, (Third row) Turk Holman, Herb Sinton, Fat Flegal, Al Thompson, Glen Laurie. 

— 3. Panorama of Monument Valley Park. — 4. (Top row) Hunter, Berry, Hamilton, Fran MacDougall, Tucker, Tancred, Nichols, Hayes Briggs, Sam McCool, — , Crowder. — 5. (Top »ow) 

Bay Crockett, McBride, Jackson, Wessen, Greiner, (Second row) Carl Brumfield, Kidder, Matlock, Edmond Crockett, Taylor, (Bottom row) Armit Slant Briggs, Mai MacDougall, Myron Carter. 

PAGE 269.— HOME COMING PARADE. 

1. Gertrude Sherk, Adelaide Brown, Alice Sweet, Suoma Leino, Eleanor Bartlett, Edna Van Horn. — 2. Stu Armit. — 3. Hall Girls Float. — 4. Fat Wigram, Cocky Crandall. — 5. Bill Tway. 

6. Dr. Harry Woodward.— 7. C. C. Band.— K. Wendell's Flivver.— 9. Harold Staff, Joe Atkinson. Al Linger, Ed Ryan. 

PAGE 271. 

1. , — — . — 2. Doc Sundbury. — 3., — — . — 4. Kathryn Varney. — 5. Lawrie Marschat. — 6. View of Williams Canon from Cave of the Winds. — 7. Pinkie Lvles, Mildred 

Rule, Pike Bruce. 



PATRONIZE NUGGET ADVERTISERS 



285 



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A Catalogue 

giving complete 

information about 

the School will be 

mailed on request 



•S 






Member National 

Association of 

Accredited 

Commercial 

chools 






■*c®»~ 



BOTHILDA E. CURTZ 

American Bank and Trust Co. 

Denver 



RAY W. TRAXLER 

Ordinance Dept. 

Washington, D. C. 



ELVA MARINE 

Hendrie & Bolthoff Mfg. Co. 

Denver 



Men and Women Need Business Trainini 



^^VERY man is compelled by circumstances to take part in business — and it is becoming true that every woman must 
It r know something about business to maintain her proper place in woman's sphere. Thousands of young men and young 
^^ women are attending accredited Commercial Schools in order that they may learn Stenography, Accountancy and 
Banking, or to prepare for Commercial Teaching or Secretarial positions, in which fields there is always a scarcity of com- 
petent applicants. |J THE CENTRAL COMMERCIAL COLLEGE, now in its thirty-fifth year, offers thorough training in 

all these courses. .Summer and Fall Sessions. 



GTfje Central Commercial College £ 



Fifteenth and Cleveland Streets 
DENVER, COLORADO 



286 



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eo/arf Bros LmqraftnqCa 

V £ Makers of Good 
Copperna/ffo/tes anc/Zinc Efcfrinqs 

Co//eye and f/fy/r Sc/too/ A/t/wa/s 

Colorado Springs •!» 



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Hotel Congress 

THE PHILBIN MANAGEMENT 

"Service For You to Enjoy" 

Pueblo 



CAFF 



COFFEE SHOP 



IfaveYouTriedaBoxof 

Brocht Chocolate? 

Theyre Wondorfull/ Delicious 



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THE AMERICAN BUSINESS COLLEGE, PUEBLO, COLO., located 
in one of the livest, most progressive cities of the West, supplies 
business trained young people to firms in various cities over a wide 
radius. It has twice as many calls for graduates as it is able to fill. 
Its graduates are so trained that they are not required to remain stenog- 
raphers, bookkeepers, etc. 

They meet with promotion after promotion, and scores of business 
executives, department heads, high salaried secretaries and accountants 
can look back to American Business College as the very starting point of 
their careers. 

In this school you are trained in secretarial, stenographic, bookkeep- 
ing and accountancy work; you are made ready for positions in business 
and in the Civil Service that pay you a better salary and give you a splen- 
did chance for advancement. 

Interested young men and young women are invited to write for 
Catalogue "C," which gives complete information concerning our Busi- 
ness Training Courses. Address 



J. A. CLARK, President 



American Business College 

PUEBLO, COLORADO 



Member Nat'I Ass'n of Accredited Commercial Schools 



,11 



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W l"16tl ltT. L/COVCr ^ *'■? always worth while to visit us 

We make a specialty of Lunches, Fine Candies, 
Bakery Goods and Fountain Drinks 

7 Broadway S h O B £ V - N C wb O 1 d DENVER 



WE MAKE EVERYTHING IN ICE CREAM 



WE DELIVER 



Swan & Sons 

COLORADO SPRINGS 
COLORADO 



WHEN IN PUEBLO OR TRINIDAD AMERICAN 

EAT AT THE - - - CAFETERIA 



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The ADAMS HOTEL CATERING CO. 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF CATERING TO 

BANQUETS, FRATERNITIES, LUNCHEONS, AND 

BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS FOR DINNERS, 

DANCES AND PARTIES. 

WHEN IN DENVER EAT AT THE ADAMS 

18th and Welton Phone Main 3350 



289 



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WHEN IN DENVER 

VISIT THE 

HOFF- SCHROEDER CAFETERIA 

All Products Fresh from Hoff-Schroeder Farm 
1545-47 Welton Phone Main 4558 



PATRONIZE 
NUGGET ADVERTISERS 



THE GRAYMOOR INN 

25 North Tejon Street. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

SODA 

ICE CREAM, SHERBETS 

LUNCHES, BAKERY 

SALADS 



'CAe Classiest 'Place in Colorado 



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We're c Behind you 'Tigers 



COLORADO 
SPRINGS 

GAZETTE 



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THE ADAMS, Denver 




16th and 
Welton 

Home at- 
mosphere, 
coupled 
with con- 
venience 
and the 
accommo- 
dationsof a 
cosmopol- 
itan hotel. 

RAT E S 
$1.50 and 
upward 



ANN LOUISE CAFETERIA 



Largest between Chicago and Coast 



Double Service 



109-11-13 East Pikes Peak Ave. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



The McRAE RESTAURANT 

THE LARGEST FLOOR SPACE OF 
ANY REST A URA NT IN THE STA TE 



Harvey House Style Lunch- 
Counter, Tables, Banquet Rooms 
and Private Dining Rooms 



105-107 East Pikes Peak Ave. 
COLORADO SPRINGS 

290 



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A Colorado Springs Product 



=♦♦= 



SAVALL not only prolongs the wear of SHOE SOLES 
and HEELS, but it WATERPROOFS them. 

SAVALL is a liquid preparation, to be painted on the 
SOLES and HEELS. It dries quickly, so that when applied 
at night the SHOES can be worn the next morning. 

SAVALL users rarely find it necessary to have their 
SHOES re-soled. The SOLES last as long as the UPPERS. 

The result of using SAVALL on CHEAP SHOES is 
nothing less than MARVELOUS. Try it and be convinced. 
IT IS EASY TO APPLY. 

EVERY USER IS A BOOSTER. 



^^j^^ m for ■■■Mh.^ 

SOLES and HEELS 

Shoes 

sl.oo 

I 
MANUFACTURED BY 

Savall Company 

Colorado Sprinqs, Colo. 



The SAVALL COMPANY offers an excellent opportunity to College Students to earn 

their way thru school if they have from two to four hours a day spare time, and will 

follow our directions. The SUMMER VACATION is a good time to start. 

WRITE FOR FULL PARTICULARS 



SAVALL COMPANY. 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



FRANK MAHAN and WILBUR HANES, Colorado Springs Representatives 



291 



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The Rocky Mountain News and 
The Denver Times 

^/~ HESE papers in their truthful and cleanly manner of 
\£y handling the current news of the day, with their high 
class, constructive editorials, have a direct appeal to 
the educated man or woman. 

They are recognized by the better class of people thruout 
the Rocky Mountain region as among the most vital forces in 
support of educational interests and the upbuilding of the 
community. 



The Rocky Mountain News . . Every Morning in the Year 
The Denver Times . . . Every Evening except Sundays 



W. W. WILLIAMSON 

REALTOR 



LOANS, INSURANCE 



340 First National Bank Bldo. 



Main 476 



Drs. Sinton, Backus and Wester 
DENTISTS 



700 Exchange National Bank Bldg Main 761 



292 



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The Colorado Fuel and 
Iron Company 

Largest Steel Makers in the West 



General Offices, DENVER, COLO. 



Steel Works, PUEBLO, COLO. 



=••= 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

STEEL RAILS, 80 to 100 Pounds per Yard, TIE 
PLATES, ANGLE BARS, TRACK SPIKES and 
BOLTS, CAST IRON WATER PIPE and SPEC- 
IALS, 4-in. to 24-in.; STEEL MERCHANT 
BARS AND ANGLES; PIPE BANDS for Wood 
Stave Pipe. PLOW STEEL, HEXAGON FUR- 
NACE BARS 



•• 

Nails, Standard, Cement Coated, Blued, Galvanized and 
Barbed; all lengths to 12-in. Staples; Fence and Poultry 
Netting; Barbed Wire, Painted and Galvanized; Plain Wire, 
all Classifications — Annealed, Coppered and Galvanized; 
Bale Ties, Single Loop, 4 to 12 ft. long; Woven Wire Fences, 
Heavy, Medium and Light; Poultry Netting, 1-in. and 2-in. 
Mesh; Minnequa Poultry Fence; Wire Straightened and 
Cut to Length 

•• 



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Benzol, Toluol, Xylol, Ammonium Sulphate, Coke 

Etc., Etc. 
MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF 

STEAM and DOMESTIC COALS 

ALL GRADES 



293 



-QUALITY 

Plus THE PRICE you approve 



APPAREL for WOMEN and CHILDREN 

Men's and Women's Furnishings, Gotham Gold Stripe 
Hose — Master Hose for Men 

Campus Togs in keeping with the times 




The J. G. Cornell Paint Co. 

Paints, Varnishes, Wall Paper, Glass 
Phone, Main 1805 — 18 East Kiowa Street 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



VULCANIZING 

Solid Tire Stat'n 

Goodrich and 
Firestone Tires 



111-113 North Cascade 




RF-TREADING 

Distributor for 
Diamond Tires. 

Dealer in 
Goodrich, U. S. 

Cord and 
Fabric Tires. 

Phone Main 202 



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The Stenographer's 
Opportunity 

The number of railroad and hank officials, editors, lawyers, and 
influential men in every line of business who have risen 
from the ranks of shorthand writers is becoming larger 
every year. 

The reason for this is evident. The stenographer writes letters 
which deal with the most important projects, as well as with 
the minutest details of the business of his employer. 

His opportunities are well explained by the following comment: 
"If young people could understand what it means to asso- 
ciate with tactful and successful business men, to take their 
dictation, to think as they think, to work, to invent, to plan, 
to execute, in complete accord with that which is brightest 
and best in business life, they would not hesitate to study 
shorthand." 

Many College students attend our summer school lor shorthand 
and book-keeping courses. 



BARNES COMMERCIAL SCHOOL 

1625 CHAMPA STREET 
DENVER, -:- -:- COLORADO 



Here Since 1899 Phone Main 500 

PHELPS' RESTAURANT 

A. YARNEY, Proprietor 
DINING ROOM :-: CAFETERIA :-: BAKERY 



105-7-9-11 East Bijou Street 



Colorado Springs 



Licensed 

MARINELLO BEAUTY SHOP 

EXPERT MARCELLING AND HAIR DRESSING 
FACIAL AND SCALP WORK 

311 North Tejon Phone 1459 W. 



LET US SERVE YOU 



CANDIES 



J. C. PENNEY COMPANY 

19 North Tejon Street, -:- Colorado Springs, Colorado 



The same Goods for Less Money. 
Better Goods for the Same Money 



29 4 



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BUTTER 




Made in Colorado Springs by 

THE I. X. L. CREAMERY COMPANY 

318-320 EAST COLORADO AVENUE 



Mill's Billiard Parlor 



Denver's High-Class Service Room 

1645 CURTIS STREET 



UP STAIRS 



20 TABLES 



YOUR DOWN-TOWN CLUB 

Make it Your Headquarters 



m 



OUR 25 years of trying to please all of the people all the 
time with the largest stock of Popular Priced Wool Suit- 
ings in the West to choose from, and the very last word 
in styles — ultra and regula? — and our prices are right. 
$20 to $60 

We cater to fussy fellows, who want their suits as they want 
them, because they want that way, and we tailor each garment for 

JUST YOU 

Giving a fit that fits with every garment. We tailor suits for every 
occasion, and our new spring stock of suitings in great variety are 
on display for your approval. We tailor extra pants, riding and 
golf pants and caps of same goods as suits your dictation. The 
breath of spring is in the air. Come, let's go! 



124 

E. Pikes Peak Ave. 




There's No Gift 
So Appropriate • 
As Jewelry 



All men and women alike appreciate all that is 
best in jewelry. 

Here at Mahans you will find fraternity insignia 
made up into rings, tie pins, bar pins and any 
form you may desire. 

You will find the college seal and college initials 
worked into excellent designs, too. 



Mahan Jewelry Co.- 

26 EAST PIKES PEAK 



295 



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Main 1288 



+ + + + + 



Where Cleaning and Pressing is Done by Experts 
and Delivery is Made Promptly' when Promised 
and When You Want It. 



Coutures 



+ + + + + 



CLEANING AND DYEING CO. 



GOIN" HIKIN'? 



OR FISHIN'? 



Drop in and Equip Yourself Properly, and Economically 

Fishing Tackle, Camp Knives, Thermos Bottles, Flash Lights, 

Mess Kits and Canteens — and Everything — and 

Things Cost a Little Less at 



THE DICKINSON HARDWARE CO. 



120 North Tejon 



Main 465 



The Market for Good Things 

Imported delicacies, steaks and other "eats" 
for hikes, hot ready-to-serve foods, fruits — 
if it's good and on the market it's at Sommers. 



RICHELIEU 
FOODS 



Pig'* 

Whistle 

Candy 



Sommers 
Market Co. 

14 S. Tejon 



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Every College 
Man Knows 
f \> the Value of 
Good 
Dressing 



And by the same token he knows the value of 
doing his shopping at a Man's store where the 
salesmen are specialists and the product recog- 
nized as men's types. 

You get Fashion Park, Hickey-Freeman and 
Society Brand clothes here at Thornton's. 
And all that is best in men's haberdashery, too. 



A MAN'S 
SHOP 



THORNTON AND CO. 

8-10 S . TEJON 



296 



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r^utdoor 
Outfitters 



To everyone who has attended C. C. 
or lived in Colorado Springs, this big 
store is known for its "Outdoor Out- 
fits." 

From a few flies for fishing to any 
athletic paraphernalia or a complete 
camp outfit, people know we have the 
things which "make good." 

Earl MacTavish (C. C.) is manager 
with special supervision over athletic 
equipment. 



=♦♦= 




A FTER School days you 
■** can buy anything fr:m 
us by mail. Distance doesn't 
count. We have many hun- 
dreds of customers all the 
way from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific. Keep in touch 
with us. 



Colorado Sporting Goods Co. 



11' 



OTIS E. McINTYRE, Pres. 
EARL MacTAVISH, Mgr. 



291 



107-109 N. Tejon 



Across from the Campus 

Every C. C. Student knows Mowry's — knows 
the between-class cones and Eskimo Pies — 
knows the Ice Cream and Pimiento Sandwiches 
which go into the "eats" at functions. 

It's convenient — across from the campus — 

MOWRY'S 



ESKIMO 
PIES 




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COtOWADO SMIIM«» 
COLOftAOO 

OOLENS in the piece- woolens from best of English 
mills — enable you to choose patterns which please. 
Hand-tailoring them to measure gives you the 
exact suit you want. 

Lindblom 



T ailor 



21 1 2 East Bijou 



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ETTER Breads and Rolls and Cakes and 
Pies and Doughnuts. A little better 
Baking in all things. "All o' the Wheat' 
Bread that's a REAL Whole Wheat 
Bread. You can depend on quality in 
baked things from — 



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The Zimmerman Baking Co. 



Lyons Candy Co. 

WHOLESALERS 

ROOD'S and all OTHER 

GOOD BRANDS OF 

CANDY 



2 1 South Cascade Ave. Phone Main 1810 



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Telephone Main 31 



THE 



UNION ICE AND COAL 
COMPANY 



DEALER IN 



Artificial and Natural Ice 

Canon, Maitland, 

Oakdale and 

Lignite Coals 

i 10 W. Vermijo Ave. Colorado Springs, Colorado 



The Newton Lumber & Mfg. Co. 

THE OLDEST AND BEST. 

BUILDING MATERIAL and MILL WORK 

GLASS OF ALL SORTS, ETC. 
Phone 62 connecting, all departments 



THE ROYAL BAKERY 

HOME OF 

THE BEST PASTRIES IN THE CITY 

Also BREAD, ROLLS and PIES. 
Retail Only. Phone M 1152. Branch Bern Food Co. Phone M 3001 



298 



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WHEN IN DENVER VISIT 
THE 

O. P. BAUR CONFECTIONERY 
COMPANY 



CATERERS and CONFECTIONERS 



1 5 12- ib Curtis 




Service and 
Satisfaction 



Phones M. 46 and 91 
107 East Kiowa Street 



t> 



e 

The El Paso Ice 
& Coal Co. 



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.OR the smart 
young Miss who 
seeks in her apparel 
that youthful, "Col- 
legiate"' touch, we 
have trim little out- 
fits at astonishingly 
low prices. 

Burns Building Phone 4152 




299 



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The Hamilton Jewelry Co 



12 NORT TEJON STREET 




For the PRACTICAL needs of Students, or the SPECIAL 

GIFTS that are inseperably interwoven 

into student days. 

Gold and Silver, Optical and Crystal Wares 



=■ 



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Nuckolls 
Packing 
Company 

COLORADO 
SPRINGS 




PEERLESS 

HAMS AND 

BACON 



WILLS 
SAINTE 
CLAIRE 

cMotor 
Cars 




1 C.H.W.ft CO. 



He explores the uncharted 
regions of the Skies. There 
are new adventures in con- 
tentment for the motorist. 

THE 

John M^Gowan 

CORPORATION 

2 East Kiowa, Cor. Cascade Ave. 
Main 2408 




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300 



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H E 



GLOCKNER SANATORIUM AND HOSPITAL 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES— Nursing is an ideal profession 
for women, and the Glockner Training School for Nurses furnishes 
all the essentials for the most thorough and modern training for 
professional nursing. In order that the nurses of the desired calibre 
be provided for the community, citizens are invited to refer well- 
qualified young women to the Sisters whenever interest in this noble 
work may be shown. 

THE GLOCKNER TRAINING SCHOOL— The Glockner Sanatorium 
and Hospital Training School for Nurses is recognized as a Class "A" 
school. It offers a full three years course covering all the branches 
of nursing, and its diplomas are accepted by all State boards. 

Theoretical class instruction is given through lectures by nation- 
ally-recognized physicians — each a specialist in the subject treated. 
Practical bedside experience and training under the supervision 
of a registered graduate nurse, insures harmonious and synchronized 
education so essential in the highest type of nurse. 



301 



THE MEDICAL STAFF— The Medical Staff of Glockner is composed 
of prominent physicians of Colorado Springs — each a specialist in 
recognized attainments, and some known nationally for their 
achievements. 

The physicians and their associates conduct the lecture work of 
each class in the school, and counsel with the Sisters in the practical 
details of training. 



For any detailed information address 

Sister Superior 
Glockner Sanatorium and Hospital 

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 



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OLIVER CANDY CO. 



MANUFACTURERS 
AND JOBBERS 



Our Candies are .Sold Everywhere in 
Colorado Springs 



Our Specialty is the Delicious 
FUDGE CREAM BAR 



845 EAST HIGH 
Phone 2649 J 



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We're Behind You, TIGERS 



WAITING TO WRITE YOUR 

INSURANCE 



COLT & ROBBINS{?L M « 9 n i ngExchangeB,d 




302 



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